1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Trailer building

Discussion in 'Garage / Workshop' started by Patrobs, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. Dec 14, 2012 at 8:21 PM
    #1
    Patrobs

    Patrobs [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2010
    Member:
    #45245
    Messages:
    131
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Patrick
    New Hampshire
    Vehicle:
    2012 Dbl Cab Short bed TRD Offroad
    I'm starting my trailer project this week. I was originally going to make the frame from 2" square stock. After talking with a friend of mine he suggested I use channel stock instead so I would not have to deal with any rust on the inside of the frame. I live in New Hampshire so this will see a lot of weather. Anyone else want to weigh in on this? The trailer will mostly be used for yard work and camping. It's going to get a tepui tent on it.
     
  2. Dec 14, 2012 at 8:38 PM
    #2
    MapleMoose

    MapleMoose Drunk Canadian

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2011
    Member:
    #51211
    Messages:
    8,589
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Ian
    West Kootenays
    Vehicle:
    1996 Tacoma SR5
    3" Eibach Coils, 3" AP Springs, AP 6" Shackles Toytec Diff drop, BAMF Sliders, Deck plate mod,Volt meter, Highbeam mod, PIAA fogs, 18" Magnaflow, LED dash swap, Color matched Satoshi Grille, Custom Rear Plate Bumper
    Channel would be a good choice forsure. It wll be more expensive but it will be stronger. Im not sure i agree with the rusting in the tubing. Just cap the ends and drill a couple holes for water drainage. The square tubing will last longer than the trailer itself.

    I work at a trailer dealership and we've built a couple trailers. All the cargo and equipment trailers 12' and up are built with 4", 6" or 8" channel frames. But the small utility are built with square tubing and angle iron.
     
To Top