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want to learn how to weld. ?'s

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussion' started by mntbiker2008, Nov 9, 2010.

  1. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:00 AM
    #1
    mntbiker2008

    mntbiker2008 [OP] First I derp.. then I herp

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    Hey guys. So I have been pondering lately about learning how to weld. I don't have much money so taking classes at a school is kind of out of the question right now. How did you all learn to weld? Any tips? I have seen the welding kits at Lowes and Home Depot for around $100 or so. Would that be ok to pick up and learn with that?

    I honestly have no idea where to start but it would make things so much better if I knew how to fabricate my own things when I need to.


    Thanks for any suggestions/comments.
     
  2. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:04 AM
    #2
    SKINUM

    SKINUM Well-Known Member

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    Curious about this as well. I could save myself a lot of money if I knew how to weld.
     
  3. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:12 AM
    #3
    mntbiker2008

    mntbiker2008 [OP] First I derp.. then I herp

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    yeah. this is mostly the reason why. I hate paying 100+ for something I can make for say 40-50
     
  4. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:14 AM
    #4
    Snowman

    Snowman I have a problem for your solutionÂ…

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    Im sure there are some youtube how-to weld videos. welding is easy, its getting good thats hard. The only way to get good is to practice.
     
  5. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:15 AM
    #5
    topgun155

    topgun155 Well-Known Member

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    Going to lowes might get you started, but soon if you are useing it a bunch you will want something better. Just google how to weld or get on youtube. Eventually with some practice you can get a decent bead down.
     
  6. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:20 AM
    #6
    Max-4_Yota

    Max-4_Yota The Welfare Cadilac

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    You can pretty much teach yourself to MIG weld if you practice, between my dad showing me the basics and just fooling around in my spare time i've gotten pretty good at it. Weve got the Lincoln Weld Pak from Home Depot, its a very good welder and have had no trouble with it. And if your going to buy a MIG welder I would spend the extra money and get one that uses gas, because it will weld easier and the welds will be stronger.
     
  7. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:27 AM
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    steve o 77

    steve o 77 braaap

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    spend some money and get a lincoln/hobart/miller MIG welder and either some flux core wire or a tank of shielding gas (the gas is way nicer). Don't waste your money on those cheap stick welders if you plan on doing automotive type stuff.
     
  8. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:29 AM
    #8
    mntbiker2008

    mntbiker2008 [OP] First I derp.. then I herp

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    Thanks guys. I will have to do some researching and get started. I am guessing the best way is to get random scraps of metal and try to weld them together and use different techniques until I find the best way?
     
  9. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:30 AM
    #9
    SKINUM

    SKINUM Well-Known Member

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    Can u post up some good machines to buy? I've looked at a few on amazon but would like to know what im buying as opposed to guessing.
     
  10. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:31 AM
    #10
    Max-4_Yota

    Max-4_Yota The Welfare Cadilac

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    Yeah just find some scrap metal and go at it, practice is the best way to learn.
     
  11. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:34 AM
    #11
    steve o 77

    steve o 77 braaap

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    Miller 140, Hobart 140, lincoln 140 are all good entry level machines. They won't do 1/4 material like a 220V machine but they get the job done.
     
  12. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:40 AM
    #12
    mntbiker2008

    mntbiker2008 [OP] First I derp.. then I herp

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    thanks!
     
  13. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:41 AM
    #13
    SKINUM

    SKINUM Well-Known Member

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    So, the majority of work on auto's and such could be done with the machines listed?
     
  14. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:46 AM
    #14
    Chachie

    Chachie Well-Known Member

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    When i learned i just picked up a sh*tty welder from HF and learned to get a descent bead with flux core, then when i picked up my Lincoln 220 with gas i could lay rolls of nickles with my eyes closed.
     
  15. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:48 AM
    #15
    mjp2

    mjp2 Living vicariously though myself Moderator

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    That Hobart Handler 140 is a great little machine, and it comes with the regulator and hoses to hook up a bottle when you're ready to give that a shot. It's also a 110v welder so you can plug it into any outlet and weld away.

    All of my welding has been outdoors/breezy so I've stuck with flux-core wire. I ran into issues with the flux clogging the tip so I switched to a .035 tip with .030 flux-core wire. No problems since.

    Get the auto-dimming helmet and gloves that Amazon recommends when looking up the welder. They work well and the price is right. I ordered the whole setup from Amazon and got free shipping as I'm a Prime member. Can't beat that!

    Welding is addictive -- I've found myself wanting to weld stuff after extended periods of not doing it. In that way it's fortunate that I tend to break stuff often. ;)

    It's a great skill to have and you'll only get better at it with time and practice.
     
  16. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:48 AM
    #16
    mntbiker2008

    mntbiker2008 [OP] First I derp.. then I herp

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    thanks man. I thought about picking up a HF welder to learn on. I may go that route for learning
     
  17. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:50 AM
    #17
    Chachie

    Chachie Well-Known Member

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    Ya. I will tell you they are really bad machines. But if you can learn to get a good bead with one, when you get a good welder it is suuuper easy. Just dont get discouraged.
     
  18. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:51 AM
    #18
    steve o 77

    steve o 77 braaap

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    Yes, we have a miller 140 (awesome compared to our old lincoln 140 BTW) and I built an entire jet ski trailer with it. We normally just use flux core since we don't have a garage to block the wind. I hooked up the gas for the trailer since you get way prettier welds with it, but you have to block the wind so your shielding gas doesn't get blown away.

    You will learn all the little tricks really quick.

    Here is some examples of what the miller can do with an amateur like me.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:51 AM
    #19
    mntbiker2008

    mntbiker2008 [OP] First I derp.. then I herp

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    thanks!

    So I guess Flux Core is generally the best or does it depend on the weather you are in? If I do any welding it will either be outside if it is a warm day or in the garage during the cold/stormy days.
     
  20. Nov 9, 2010 at 11:59 AM
    #20
    steve o 77

    steve o 77 braaap

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    then you should probably stick to flux core for now since you plan on welding outside. It is not quite as easy and is a bit messier, but it gets the job done.
     
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