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Welding class...

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by LonghornTaco, Jan 31, 2009.

  1. Jan 31, 2009 at 11:16 PM
    #1
    LonghornTaco

    LonghornTaco [OP] Can you pass the bailout please?

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    I have a question and I thought someone here might be able to offer some insight...

    I got this idea from another thread, but at some point, I'd like to get a rear plate bumper and I would like to learn how to weld. So I thought I'd try to put the two togeter and take a welding class - just some sort of night class.

    But my question is do these types of classes have something like "final projects" where I can build whatever I want (within reason) as long as I pay for materials? Is a rear bumper even something that could be done by a novice?

    Don't know, just a thought... :)
     
  2. Jan 31, 2009 at 11:18 PM
    #2
    Ghost96Romeo

    Ghost96Romeo What is the Search Tab for????

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    Sorry no clue, but I'd say go for it.

    I doubt that they're gonna have you welding anything you don't want to learn to. Just explain to them what you're goals are for the class and see what they say.
     
  3. Feb 1, 2009 at 6:15 AM
    #3
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    Buy a welder.... buy some books, and practice on some scrap metal. Check with your local schools or whatever and ask them about welding classes. It's better than nothing. But - I wouldn't necessarily say you NEED to take a class. There's sooo much information online, you could read and practice on your own.

    My husband and I have a welder but haven't used it very much at all. No classes, just tinkering around in the garage. I've done some stupid little things that didn't matter.

    You gotta 'weigh' the importance of the project a novice can work on. Say for instance - a novice can easily work on skid plating, but they SHOULD NOT work on axle spring perches.

    So, if you're talking about building a rear bumper - that's much better for a novice to work on than a front bumper (for reasons of frontal impact, etc where engineering plays more importance).

    Did that make sense?
    Practice, practice, practice.
    I think the hardest part about welding (that I've learned), is setting the welder up properly and having the steady hands to move it properly and with the proper speed (MIG that is).
     
  4. Feb 1, 2009 at 6:19 AM
    #4
    wildjerseyfirefighter

    wildjerseyfirefighter I sell fishing and fishing accessories

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    ive taken welding classes at my local vocational school and they always say if you have any projects you want to do, bring them in. I suppose that means you gotta supply material also.
     
  5. Feb 1, 2009 at 6:19 AM
    #5
    Delmarva

    Delmarva Mayor of TW

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    ^^
    Well said Janster. I would also add that if you suck ass at soldering, you'll suck ass at welding... just a thought...

    I can't solder to save my life, so I would be a shitty welder... :laugh:
     
  6. Feb 1, 2009 at 8:58 AM
    #6
    LonghornTaco

    LonghornTaco [OP] Can you pass the bailout please?

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    Well, this would probably be the ideal situation, but I live in an apartment so I have NO place to either do welding or store welding equipment. That's why I thought about the class...
     
  7. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:01 AM
    #7
    beastlytaco

    beastlytaco This is TW. One never knows what is a joke anymore

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    normally community colleges have this sort of thing. i know the one near me does. and they normally do let you bring in your own projects to work on.
     
  8. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:03 AM
    #8
    silver07taco

    silver07taco Well-Known Member

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    That is a good idea to take some classes, I would like to to advance my crappy welding skills, I dont know how hard it would be to build a bumper, But if you put you mind to it you can do anything.
     
  9. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:22 AM
    #9
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    You're probably better off buying an aftermarket bumper.

    Seriously, there's a lot more to welding than you think. It's an art, takes steady hands (which I don't have) and an understanding of how the whole process (physics) works.

    Surely - you could take a class and get a basic idea of what its all about. I don't think you could whip up a 'bumper' just from one class alone. A bumper is serious building - and unless you have your own equipment to gain experience with...it's probably not worth the effort.

    That's just my thoughts. There are lots of people who build stuff just hacking around. It just depends on how serious you are about how the final products will look like & function.
     
  10. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:24 AM
    #10
    beastlytaco

    beastlytaco This is TW. One never knows what is a joke anymore

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    yeah it can get confusing

    TIG welder
    MIG welder
    ARC welder.

    btw, ARC welding is more popular now because its done by the means of electricity.
     
  11. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:27 AM
    #11
    LonghornTaco

    LonghornTaco [OP] Can you pass the bailout please?

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    An aftermarket bumper would be a great idea, I just haven't found any plate bumpers that I like that aren't a bazillion dollars... And I don't like the rear tube bumpers that everyone seems to build for the Tacomas...
     
  12. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:35 AM
    #12
    silver07taco

    silver07taco Well-Known Member

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    Mine has shipped out and it was just over 500, Ill have pics up when it comes in.
     
  13. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:42 AM
    #13
    LonghornTaco

    LonghornTaco [OP] Can you pass the bailout please?

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    Yeah, I'm looking forward to that report... That bumper is a possibility, but I have reservations based on reputation...
     
  14. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:47 AM
    #14
    Ry1984

    Ry1984 Well-Known Member

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    even if you buy the bumper, take the class! its fun as hell. i took welding in college when i was going for auto mechanics. and yes other than doing your own welding on your own time we did have a final product project of your own. i had a blast in that class
     
  15. Feb 1, 2009 at 9:50 AM
    #15
    silver07taco

    silver07taco Well-Known Member

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    Right right 07taco has one from them he likes his, said it fit good
     
  16. Feb 1, 2009 at 3:56 PM
    #16
    Evil Monkey

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    I think a class would be a great idea. One advantage of a class is you have an experienced person present that can show you where you're going wrong. Self-experimentation is fine, but you can waste a lot of time trying to figure out what you're doing wrong when an expert can quickly point it out. It'd be better to learn from an expert's advice first, then do your practicing. You'll cut out a lot of waste. The problem with just searching on the internet is you never really know where you should start and it's easy to get sidetracked with information overload. A structured class is usually more organized. Get a basic foundation first, and then do the internet thing to improve your skill.
     
  17. Feb 1, 2009 at 4:31 PM
    #17
    Monkeysuncle

    Monkeysuncle My Cat's breath Smells like Cat Food

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    MIG-Metal Inert GAS
    TIG-Tungeston Inert Gas
    Arc- Electric rod encapsulated in a flux
    Oxy Acetylene- Uses heat to melt and join similar metals and to braise.
    MIg uses a non-inert gas to act as a fux(co20 OR argon gas) to free the weld pool of oxygen to create a clean weld.
    TIG - Tungeston inert gas is more advanced and way more expensive, usually on stainless steel ot aluminum, can be used on steel welds for fine detail
    Arc is just as it claims. An electric arc is jumped between to similar metals, the rod has a flux coating that burns while the weld is made. "Keeping the weld clean" the flux has to be removed to keep the weld solid and strong.

    The hard part here would be the FAB work to get a bumper. I own most, or have access to these tools, minus the plasma cutter, I have thought about it, but there is always one major tool I don't own yet. I have a oxy acetelyine torch and an arc weldetr....honestly I have thought about rock sliders more often. Kevin
     
  18. Feb 1, 2009 at 4:35 PM
    #18
    Monkeysuncle

    Monkeysuncle My Cat's breath Smells like Cat Food

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    The ability to cut, bend, measure, weld ...if the school offered that then yes. That is just my 2C
     
  19. Feb 1, 2009 at 4:36 PM
    #19
    Snyperx

    Snyperx Seniore Marcos

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    I just did something similar. I bought a little 120v/100amp welder from Harbor Freight to mess around. So far I made a set of mounting brackets for my Hi-Lift jack. No classes, just messing around. I would also like to take some classes, but MATC doesn't seem to be offering the class any more since enrollment is low.
     
  20. Feb 1, 2009 at 4:43 PM
    #20
    Monkeysuncle

    Monkeysuncle My Cat's breath Smells like Cat Food

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    My first welder was a Miller cricket that used Argon as the inert gas. Wire fed, great for small uses and detail work, i bought a Victor, Oxygen Acetelyne torch, to keep aroung the home garage. I love it. I received a arc welder from my dad that I would only use to build a boat trailer OR weld some kick ass sliders on my truck. FYI, the arc welding electrodes give you a code. Tensil strengh at the weld, maximum output as far as voltage is concerned, and I cant remember the third. ( don't use the arc too much) Kevin
     
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