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Welding Questions

Discussion in 'Garage / Workshop' started by johnnyboy, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. Jan 10, 2010 at 12:06 PM
    #1
    johnnyboy

    johnnyboy [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Ladies and Gents,

    I want to get into welding soon, mainly to build a bumper because of a recent front end collision, and sliders, and whatever.

    I have read and researched a TON on the differences and types of welders out there; from MIG, TIG, "stick", and whatever in between.

    As stated, my main goal is to weld tube bumpers, sliders, and smaller projects; nothing huge like structural work.

    1. I want something "simple" and DO NOT want to deal with gases and whatever.

    2. Another MAJOR concern of mines is the power outlet consumption of the welder; I know I don't have any 240V outlets in the garage and do not want to get into making one (<<< probably kill myself).

    3. Poor college student, so looking for a low cost but good one.

    My choices are pretty much down to "stick" and MIG/flux core, mainly due to the simplicity of them. I understand the pros and cons of each and found some.

    I just want opinions on these if they are good enough for tube bumpers, sliders, similar work.

    Some that I'm interested in:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Lincoln-Weld-Pak...item45ef931234

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91110

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=94056
     
  2. Jan 10, 2010 at 12:12 PM
    #2
    rab89

    rab89 Well-Known Member

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    x2 !!!!!!!
     
  3. Jan 10, 2010 at 12:13 PM
    #3
    dually

    dually Low and slow

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    Not as many as the 98..
    Honestly.. Your best way is to go with a GMAW welder. MIG will be your best freind. Miller has some really nice 120 machines.

    The gas isnt a hassle at all.. costs me $35 to fill my tank every month or so, more in the summer.

    Stay away from those small flux core wire feed, the weld quality is garbage with those, unless you run bigger wire and have a 240v system. Also, those harbor freight SMAW machines look chinsey... SMAW welding can look nice if you've had plenty of experience, but you have to deal with the slag and spatter.

    If you can stick with one of these three brands: Miller, Lincoln, and Hobart. You'll be happy with one of them.
     
  4. Jan 10, 2010 at 12:20 PM
    #4
    rab89

    rab89 Well-Known Member

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    Grillcraft mx black upper and lower BHLM with Gloss black 265 70 17 bfg a/t center console light mini mag mounted in center console debadged bed lights 35W 5000k HID's
    GREAT IDEA CONOR! I will too!
     
  5. Jan 10, 2010 at 12:29 PM
    #5
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Staff Member

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    X2 on the Flux core wire.....I belive that was causing all my welds to look like buggars.....thats my story, and Im sticking to it. :cool:
     
  6. Jan 10, 2010 at 12:40 PM
    #6
    rab89

    rab89 Well-Known Member

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    I have read that Stick is harder to get used to, but gives a deeper weld, which for a newbie sounds good, cause learning just takes some practice, and nice deep strong welds would be nice... can anyone recommend a small 120v stick welder for $300 ish?

    Edit: I know it's not always a "deeper" weld, but I've heard when new to welding, people often don't get a deep weld using mig.
     
  7. Jan 10, 2010 at 12:40 PM
    #7
    JDMcQ

    JDMcQ Well-Known Member

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    I have been quite happy with my Miller 140 Autoset. Simple to use and affordable. Welded on my sliders with no problems (aside from my lack of talent). It will do sheetmetal up to 3/16, although with the proper technique you can go up to 1/4. Runs on 120V, just make sure you have a 20 amp circuit. I bought mine at http://www.cyberweld.com
     
  8. Jan 10, 2010 at 3:45 PM
    #8
    dually

    dually Low and slow

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    Well, it actually depends if you're dragging or pushing the puddle to really decide if you get deep penetration. With stick or SMAW, prepare to buy plenty of scrap metal to practice with.. It doesnt take that long, but it does take a while to get a grasp on the whip and pause method of 6010 rod.. and even the dragging of 7018.. I guarantee you, that you'll be happier with a wirefeed over a stick machine.
     
  9. Jan 10, 2010 at 3:50 PM
    #9
    mreimann

    mreimann vv I think it's growing

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    x2

    I have the same one.

    I started with flux core wire, but it was too messy so i got a gas tank.....and it's way easier than it seems.

    the miller 140 comes with the regulator so all you need is the tank. all you have to do is set the flow on the tank and then when it runs out just get it filled up. it's not hard to learn!
     
  10. Jan 10, 2010 at 3:54 PM
    #10
    JDMcQ

    JDMcQ Well-Known Member

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    Yep, I haven't tried the flux core yet, but I have been able to do everything I need to with solid core.
     
  11. Jan 10, 2010 at 3:55 PM
    #11
    4low2go

    4low2go Well-Known Member

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    One of the best welders out there in Miller. I have had the 130 Migmatic and the 250 Migmatic? with the optional aluminum spool gun setup. They are awesome. There are plenty to choose from, 120v versions and 230v ones. They have all performed excellent.
     
  12. Jan 10, 2010 at 6:05 PM
    #12
    johnnyboy

    johnnyboy [OP] Well-Known Member

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    appreciate all the inputs but...

    would this little guy work for welding up tube bumpers (1.75x.120) and sliders:

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=91110

    I understand that DC is preferred, and this little thing is DC. The main reasons why I am considering this one are because:

    1. DC powered
    2. Can penetrate 1/4" thick steel plates (enough for 1.75x.120 tube bumpers and sliders)
    3. Plugs into any "standard" wall outlet (assuming one w/20 amps)
    4. Last but not least...on the cheap.

    Let me know yer opinions, thanks.

    PS: I really don't care about cleaning slags and "not-so-pretty" welds, as long as they are functional.
     
  13. Jan 10, 2010 at 7:24 PM
    #13
    pittim

    pittim Play stupid games, win stupid prizes

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    Buying a used Miller, Lincoln, or Hobart would probably be better than buyin a HF unit.
     
  14. Jan 10, 2010 at 7:50 PM
    #14
    johnnyboy

    johnnyboy [OP] Well-Known Member

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    WOW, that looks great APIMPDAD.

    you are saying that you used a 110V flux-cored welder for that? <<< that looks pretty darn good to me. How does it hold up???

    My main reason for not going to 220/240V is because of my limitations of outlets in my garage. As stated in my initial post, I do not want to get in to, or have someone else tap for more voltages (too much headaches, explanations, and money); I just want simplicity and the ability to weld tube bumpers.

    I have found that the Hobart EZ125 is within my range; for voltage and price...http://www.hobartwelders.com/product.../handler125ez/.

    Is this thing capable of welding good welds for a front/rear tube bumpers and/or sliders???
     
  15. Jan 10, 2010 at 7:56 PM
    #15
    YumaTRD

    YumaTRD Chewie is my Co-pilot

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    It would be better to get a MIG welder. They work better for sheet metal and thin gauge welding and you could do spot welds especialy the 120V models.
    A con for the stick welder is that they work best at 220V.

    X2 on buying a used miller over a HF unit.
     
  16. Jan 10, 2010 at 8:02 PM
    #16
    YumaTRD

    YumaTRD Chewie is my Co-pilot

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    the hobart is a great flux core welder to start.
    you should compare it with a lincoln flux core welder because some lincoln models have the option of upgrading it to a mig welder with a $100 kit.
     
  17. Jan 10, 2010 at 8:08 PM
    #17
    Marc M

    Marc M Dirty White Boy

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    You need to check the duty cycle of the welder. Most of the cheap no name welders can only handle short bursts of welding, then you have to let them cool for a certain amount of time.

    My father in law bought a flux core mig welder from northern hydraulics, don't get me wrong, it welds but the spatter and flying sparks suck balls.

    My dad bought one of the first lincoln 110 volt gas shielded mig welders new that were available many years ago. We still use that thing to this day with great results.

    Marc M
     
  18. Jan 10, 2010 at 8:10 PM
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    fletch aka

    fletch aka www.BeLikeBrit.org

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  19. Jan 10, 2010 at 8:19 PM
    #19
    YumaTRD

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  20. Jan 10, 2010 at 8:31 PM
    #20
    WhatThePho?

    WhatThePho? Greg Graffin 2016

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    I would look towards a Hobart 187

    Flux core is basic. It's simple, but its kinda hard to weld with it. It'll take you a few spools to get used to. Hard thing about flux is you can't see the puddle when you are welding. But once you get used to it you're golden.

    If I was in your boat and didn't want to go with a 220 volt I'd get a Hobart 125 or 140. Both of those welders are good machine. I would look away from the Harbor Freight stuff. They are total garbage.

    Both of those 2 welders allow you to go to a gas set up in the future.

    Edit.
    Hobart 140
    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200306073_200306073

    Hobart 125
    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200127024_200127024
     
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