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Whats in your Bug Out Bag

Discussion in 'Guns & Hunting' started by DRJ1014, Sep 29, 2016.

  1. Oct 23, 2016 at 8:28 PM
    #21
    WyomingSkidmark

    WyomingSkidmark Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely. If your moving through an urban environment on foot the last thing you want is to attract attention to yourself. For myself I don't need to worry about this since I live in the most rural state and only have to hop in my truck and drive an hour deep into some mountains and find a nice lonely spot to hole out in for a while. If driving there is not an option then its a 24hr movement on foot. Learning to navigate on foot at night would be hugely beneficial, not many people active and you can move through danger areas a lot easier. Getting out and actually using your gear during weekend camping trips not only gets you comfortable with your gear but also tells you what works and what doesn't. You also get to explore different areas and scout possible hide sites for the future.
     
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  2. Oct 23, 2016 at 8:34 PM
    #22
    IronPeak

    IronPeak Pro Lurker

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    For in my "less expensive" bob/ghb (cause it might get stole) I'm going to order one of these stove/pot setups, I've got some partial bottles of isobutane to go with it. I'll report back once it arrives but the reviews are good. And at 22$ the price can't be beat

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B015SRB58U/ref=ox_sc_act_title_9?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=AI22NKZCZOZRU
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2016
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  3. Oct 24, 2016 at 10:16 AM
    #23
    taco_pat

    taco_pat Well-Known Member

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  4. Oct 24, 2016 at 3:15 PM
    #24
    wesplains

    wesplains Well-Known Member

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    First thanks OP.

    Second if shit its the fan at any level and you got a bag of any kind. Some bunch of AHs are going to try and take it. Just look at what happen in the NO stadium. Pros and cons for all you know some dipstick might actually engage his mind and say wait a minute, might be easier pickings.

    All I am saying is no matter what it is in there is always some AH wanting it. This is based on over 20 years in law enforcement. Just my $00.02.
     
  5. Oct 24, 2016 at 3:19 PM
    #25
    grdgz97

    grdgz97 Well-Known Member

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    Toilet paper??:anonymous:
     
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  6. Oct 24, 2016 at 3:22 PM
    #26
    DRJ1014

    DRJ1014 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    :facepalm:

    added...lol




    I plan to keep my BoB in my truck. I dont mind the tactical look because I am not going to be Jason Bourne and running from bus to train trying to get away. Its just for supplies I will need in the event of something happening and needing a little time to get to my house or another place for shelter/supplies.
     
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  7. Oct 24, 2016 at 3:24 PM
    #27
    ga_mcm

    ga_mcm Well-Known Member

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    I keep an LED headlamp in mine. It just makes life easier if you're trying to do something with your hands.
     
  8. Nov 3, 2016 at 10:42 AM
    #28
    ejl923

    ejl923 Well-Known Member

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    Well said. A bag is an asset, an asset is a target. Plus, tactical looking bag could actually be a deterrent. But, so many people have those types of bags i dont think it matters in the long run.
     
  9. Nov 3, 2016 at 7:52 PM
    #29
    wesplains

    wesplains Well-Known Member

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    OP just wanted to let you know I picked up one of these bags. Thanks again.

    ejl923 you are probably right.
     
  10. Nov 6, 2016 at 6:32 PM
    #30
    KD0QDQ

    KD0QDQ Member

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    Those who flame burn their own house!!
     
  11. Nov 14, 2016 at 12:35 PM
    #31
    hack

    hack Vets Helping Vets

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    None so far
    I have a summer bag and a winter bag. My summer has things like bug spray, extra water bottles , ect. My winter bag has most of the same stuff but add extra clothes, gloves, fire starter, etc. I always carry a few extras mags outside the bag for just in case stuff. I also make sure my wife's bag has the same stuff.
     
  12. Nov 20, 2016 at 9:49 PM
    #32
    dolooper

    dolooper Active Member

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    Bug out to where? I know it seems like a flip question but it's not. If you know where you're going then forget I asked.

    I live in the northwest and while I'm close to both state and federal forests, in a true Shtf I figure there's gonna be a shitload of folks "bugging out" and there'll be like 10 guys per acre trying to figure things out. The only winners will be the assholes and criminals.

    I keep bags in my cars. They're for getting home, where I have what I need for a while at least and enough to make a reasonable defense for a while. I figure 95% of the time I'm in my car I'm within a day's walk home and most times I don't have to cross any major rivers, so my bags are designed for two days.
     
  13. Jan 2, 2017 at 7:28 PM
    #33
    MadDaddy

    MadDaddy Pork Rind Extraordinaire

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    If not simply holding over in a natural disaster, I agree, "where" is step 1. Plan everything else around getting to that destination. I'm certainly no prepper, but nuclear fallout comes to mind rather quickly. Drift is going to wipe out A TON in suburban areas. I'm just thinking off the top of my head so I could be way wrong, but getting to the coast or to higher elevations is paramount.

    The question of preparedness for "whatever" came up at bowling league one night. The preacher on our team; a country boy and father of two small kids, mentioned how he keeps a lock box with $1,000, passports, medical information, a 12 ga. shotgun and two boxes of shells. He never lets his vehicle drop below 1/2 tank of gas. He started with the question "Where?" For him, it's his family's 200+ acre farm within an hour's drive on back roads. If mass evacuation is a concern, he has the passports, medical info, and cash at the ready.

    I got to thinking about this whole thing myself, which brought me to this thread. I decided to make a pack list but started with the question "Where?" I have two options, and perhaps y'all can make suggestions.

    Destination Option 1: 4 hours south to family homestead. 250 acres, 2 miles out of a rural town (pop. +/-3500). 30 minutes to Florida caverns and 90 more minutes South to the Gulf of Mexico (where we keep two boats). Pros:Plenty of wild game, and I can set up deep in the woods far from the nearest road. Assuming a MAJOR nuclear event, the biggest threats in the first week would be fallout blowing from states westward and unprepared civilians running around like chickens with their heads cut off going berserk in the aftermath. Fresh water springs abound in every direction with the nearest freshwater source 3.5 miles west. Family is near, a well as my dad's state patrol post. He is readily equipped and connected for when SHTF. He has a personal arsenal, armor, ammo, and an older 4x4 (but it's a Dodge). Deep local connections.
    Cons: Most likely have to use or cross multiple interstates. Like I said, 4 hour drive in prime conditions. If we lost our vehicle en route, we'd be up the creek without a paddle. Can't hoof it with a wife and two kids.

    Destination Option 2: 2 hours north to family cabin in mountains. 7 miles outside of town (though many retirement cabins surround the property), Pros: 2 acres that backs up to a power cut and a 75 million cubic meter lake 50 yards down the hill. Plentiful fish and wildlife abound. Can get there without using or crossing interstates. If we lost our vehicle, there are several trails (including the AT) that lead us near our destination. Higher elevation. Pro/Con: Plenty of longtime, anti-gov preppers across the state line. Cons: Farther from family and homestead. ZERO local connections. No cell service.

    I have a basic family camping setup: 4-person water treated tent, sleeping bags, bed rolls, tarps, duct tape, axe, cooking gear, lanterns, LED flashlights & headlamps, printed road and hiking maps, water bottles, long shelf life food, first aid kits, hiking boots, rain gear.

    I am looking to build a couple packs. I have a basic Get Home pack in my truck: First Aid kit, boots & socks, rain gear, LED flashlight & headlamp, whistle, compass, Swiss Army knife. I'm looking to beef this up somewhat. Granted, I work 4 miles from home and my kids are in between.

    I want to build a Stay at Home kit for short-term disaster recovery. Perhaps a week's worth of supplies. We have a spring-fed creek that flows even in droughts, so water is not a major concern. We live in a gully with abundant wildlife. Neighbors are ex-military and LEO, so we're all armed.

    I want to invest in a family-size GTFO rig. This means two packs (one for myself and one for my wife) holding the majority of what we need to get to option 1 or 2 mentioned above if we have to hoof it at any point. Dividing up the supplies between two packs will be my main focus. I'm not into "Tactical" anything. I do not want to be perceived as any type of threat to anybody. I want to appear to simply be a fleeing family (which we are). Still, we will be armed with two pistols, a rifle and a shotgun (ideally would stow these safely in truck during exit).

    Now that I wrote a book, any pointers from y'all?
     
  14. Jan 3, 2017 at 10:14 AM
    #34
    Taco168501

    Taco168501 Well-Known Member

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    Nice backpack, I have one like , but that's way nicer.
     
  15. Jan 4, 2017 at 10:57 AM
    #35
    dolooper

    dolooper Active Member

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    I guess it really depends on what your GTFO away from. Biggest risk in my neck of the wood are large scale social disruption most likely related to a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake event. My preferred method of dealing with a nuclear event is 45-minutes advance notice and bottle of Jack Daniels (even though I don't drink) followed by quarter sheet of blotter acid.

    Any event that includes the prospect of rapid mass migration means the migration will be the opposite of rapid. As well, the supply chain for most items will be measured in days and for critical items like fuel, food, and water, will be measured in hours.

    Whatever your destination, I suspect one will need to have onhand all the fuel and other necessary to get all the way there and then necessary to procure any future needed items. If water is 3.5 miles away, that's at least two hours a day schlepping water in the absence of fuel.

    I have some remote acreage. It's a little more than 3 hours away. It entails crossing multiple bridges and at least one tunnel. Traffic on the road from a mass migration aside, the likelihood of sufficient infrastructure to make the trip in a massive earthquake event is unlikely.

    Even if i were to take that path, I do not have sufficient resources to defend the land from a determined group of a dozen assholes, and whatever resources I have there will likely become just welcoming targets for any roaming band of a dozen assholes.

    Same holds true for trying to bug out to any of the nearest forest/wilderness areas. There will be a metric fuckton of people with the same idea, the the defensibility of water or other resources will be problematic at best.

    I have decided that my best route is to plan on sheltering/defending in place. I can have more resources readily available and will not use valuable fuel to simply change my geography in the hope that things are better someplace else. I doubt they will be.

    Again, it all depends on the type of event. And the rapidity combined with the degree of migration or social dislocation.

    My own humble $.02.
     
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  16. Jan 4, 2017 at 11:59 AM
    #36
    MadDaddy

    MadDaddy Pork Rind Extraordinaire

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    I talked with my wife last night and we came up with a few scenarios and how to prepare without going overboard to "PREPPER" madness.

    Weather event (hurricane, snowstorm, tornado): We hunker down. We're good to go at home with water, tools, shelter, alternative heat source if we lose power for a few days to a week. Between myself and our direct neighbors, we have the equipment and know how to get ourselves out if blocked in by downed trees. I have one solar panel on the roof wired into the attic that I can tap for some needs.
    In the event of civil unrest, again, myself and direct neighbors are adequately armed.

    Atlanta hit with a big bomb: Ideally we'd head South to fam. Myself, dad and uncle+ siblings are experienced and equipped enough to sustain ourselves at the farm long-term. We all have differing skills that would blend well. This trek would be feasible given enough notice to hit the road. Macon, Augusta, Columbus, Savannah and Brunswick would be secondary targets. Getting through Macon would be the biggest task.

    Given little to no notice: We head north to the mountains. This is our primary plan. If the kids had to hoof it, they could, and there are ample established trails if we had to ditch the truck.

    We don't have friends with a helicopter anymore and my pilot friends who own their own planes are few and far between, so we'd be on the ground for the entirety of the trek. I drew up a packing list for Hunkering down, getting home, and bugging out today. Hunker down bin is nearly complete, save for some food staples. I sorted and repacked my get home kit in my truck. I'm working on my wife's next. The Bugout bags will take longer and be a larger investment. I've made a list of needed supplies and it looks like we could distribute things according to size among myself, my wife, and our oldest. The biggest kink in the plan is who totes the 20 mo. old. :confused:
     
  17. Jan 13, 2017 at 4:10 AM
    #37
    Mr-Paul

    Mr-Paul Well-Known Member

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    I put small tampons (not kidding) in my bag. They are great for first aid and fire starter. I was on a 10-day backpacking trip in NM a couple of years ago with Boy Scouts. 4 different Eagle Scouts could not get a fire going in the back-country; and then I got a fire started with a tampon soaked in white gas.

    You should throw some water treatment tablets in the bag too. They are much easier to use than filtering. You can drink dirty water, if it has been disinfected.

    Small sewing kit. You can give yourself stitches or fix ripped clothes. The needle is good for draining foot blisters. I did that in the bottom of the Grand Canyon last year.

    Hand sanitizer gel. Can start fires too.
     
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  18. Jan 13, 2017 at 4:17 AM
    #38
    GPLarge

    GPLarge N1ALW

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  19. Jan 13, 2017 at 12:28 PM
    #39
    TruckFan09

    TruckFan09 Well-Known Member

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    I thought about making a bug out bag for my truck, but decided that I didn't want to have to have a full bag in my truck at all times...either it takes up space in the cab or is under a locked tonneau cover in the bed that wouldn't be that hard to get into if you are somewhat determined. Instead I went with a "deconstructed" approach. I have all the items you normally would think to have in such bag organized throughout my truck (center console, glove box, under seats, etc.) and then threw in a non-bulky empty back pack. I figure IF the situation arose, I then could pack what is necessary for the situation and be on my way.

    I know I wouldn't be able to just pick up the bag in the truck and "bug out", but feel it works for me.
     
  20. Jan 13, 2017 at 1:21 PM
    #40
    MadDaddy

    MadDaddy Pork Rind Extraordinaire

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    This is what I did. Everything is behind the rear seat including a collapsible hiking pack that can carry everything if needed.

     
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