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Whats the right tool for the job?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Bananahands, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. Jan 29, 2009 at 10:42 AM
    #1
    Bananahands

    Bananahands [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I just bought my 05' DC LB TRD Sport a few weeks ago. MAN I LOVE THIS TRUCK! But since I bought it the compass/thermometer has gone out. It was out when I bought it, then it flickered on a few times now nothing. So I'm going to try the soldering fix but there's a problem. I've never soldered in my life and don't own a soldering iron. Which one should I buy? Is there really a difference between most soldering irons? Obviously soldering doesn't come up for me very often so I don't want to spend a lot of money, just something that will get the job done correctly. thanks for any help,
    Khris
     
  2. Jan 29, 2009 at 10:53 AM
    #2
    cvillechopper

    cvillechopper Jackass to the masses

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    Go to radio shack and get the cheapest starter kit you can find. It'll have an iron, thin plate to rest it on so you don't burn your work surface, some flux-core solder and maybe even a heat sink. It's been a long time since I bought mine but it was only like $12 at the time. Don't waste your money on the cool soldering tools. They don't last long unless you buy an expensive model (at least not the way I use them).
     
  3. Jan 29, 2009 at 10:56 AM
    #3
    Bananahands

    Bananahands [OP] Well-Known Member

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    ok, sounds good. So it doesn't really matter what wattage it is? or what the "soldering material" is?
     
  4. Jan 29, 2009 at 11:24 AM
    #4
    cvillechopper

    cvillechopper Jackass to the masses

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    K&N drop-in air-filter, extra D-rings, Custom Console lock-box, Leather heated seats, Studly Driver
    You just want a basic flux-core solder. i would suggest that you practice on some extra wire a time or 2. you need to get the metal to be soldered hot but don't want to melt the insulation, board, etc. Once it's hot, stick the solder against it and use the iron to help it melt. i little goes a long way.
     
  5. Jan 29, 2009 at 11:50 AM
    #5
    chabro

    chabro Well-Known Member

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    Yeah the cheap solder iron will get the job done for ya. Quick hint. Season the wire. ie Heat the wire with the iron for a few seconds and then apply the solder one tail at a time. Then take the two seasoned ends, put them together and heat again. Voila. Perfectly soldered joint.
     
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