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Wheeling with tire chains?

Discussion in 'Off-Roading & Trails' started by Badwin45, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. Aug 3, 2010 at 3:02 PM
    #1
    Badwin45

    Badwin45 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Since I do 95% of my driving on pavement and don't generally go off-road except when hunting, I've decided on the Hankook Dynapro ATM's for my next set of tires. Occasionally though, I need to drive some muddy county roads to get where I'm going. The surface of these roads are pretty solid except that the top 1"-3" are slimy clay after rains over 1". The ditches on either side get deep though and I'd like some extra traction to help keep me out of them if possible. Speed on these roads is 25 mph when dry and obviously less when wet. Will tire chains serve my needs here?

    Thinking about these:
    http://www.tirechain.com/DIAMONDSTYLECARCHAINS.htm
     
  2. Aug 6, 2010 at 7:56 PM
    #2
    nvdeserted

    nvdeserted Well-Known Member

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    If you're up for the hassle chains will help in that type of mud. I've used some on a UTV before in similar mud-type, it was night and day once the chains were on. Traction went from 0 without chains, to 80% w/chains.

    Those chains in your link look a bit tame for off-road chains; that type of chain is fairly specific for traction on snow/ice, kinda weak for trails.

    You should look into something a little beefier, thicker chain, to help get through that top layer better. Those smaller chains look like they will just load up real quick or break.
     
  3. Aug 6, 2010 at 8:00 PM
    #3
    whippersnapper02

    whippersnapper02 Well-Known Member

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    There are offroad specific chains out there. The Bill Burke DVDs I bought recently name a chain brand but I don't remember it right now.
     
  4. Aug 6, 2010 at 10:23 PM
    #4
    Badwin45

    Badwin45 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. I called the vendor and they were very helpful. The did say that the diamond pattern chains are too weak for mud use and to go with the heavier round-twisted link or square link chains. I'm going to try to have a set of the square links before hunting season hits.
     
  5. Aug 8, 2010 at 5:47 PM
    #5
    6spdtaco

    6spdtaco Well-Known Member

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    I've used chains pretty extensively. Mostly in snow/ice, but also in mud. If you want real traction get some v-bar chains. Also carry with you 6-8 bunjee cords(3-4) per wheel. The more the better. Don't rely on the ones that come with the chains. Get the heavy duty rubber ones. By getting the chains as tight as possible with the bunjees, you can go faster without them moving themselves or hitting your wheel wells. Beware of damage though, I have broken a chain at high wheel speeds while stuck and the chain rapped itself around my axle and tore my ABS all to hell about 7 years ago. Expensive fix. There is still a single chain link hooked on a brake line on that vehicle that I've never bothered cutting off. I prefer only two chains for most applications, but carry 4 in my truck. Chaining the rear wheels is best for overall traction, and GREAT if you have a locker. Actual driving speeds with "real" tire chains is very limited and I wouldn't recommend much more than 15-20 mph. If you get less aggressive chains the speeds can be higher. You shouldn't need chains if you can drive that fast though.
     
  6. Aug 8, 2010 at 9:09 PM
    #6
    nvdeserted

    nvdeserted Well-Known Member

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    Electric Dynolock tailgate, TrailGear Slides, , 285/75-16 Yoko Geolanders on Wheelers Type B, SAW 2.0 front and back, Camburg b/j UCA, 1.5" AAL, Ubolt flip, ARB bump.
    6spd reminds me of a good point, if your tires are close to rubbing, or already rub, don't even think about putting chains on the front wheels: when your front suspension is compressed or the wheels are turn-locked the chains will just rip out inner fenders/flares/etc.

    If you're running 32s or smaller you should be fine. and you'll be fine on the rears with up to a 33 probably.

    Also take the extra effort to readjust/retighten the chains often. Like 6spd said, if a chain comes off it can F S up!
     
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