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Will my truck pull this all right?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by 230g Hydra-Shok, Sep 30, 2011.

  1. Oct 1, 2011 at 3:49 AM
    #21
    tailwaters

    tailwaters Well-Known Member

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    Lots of folks pull more than their vehicle is rated for and in most cases it works out just fine. That is until you have an accident. At that point if they check and discover your over the allowable weight you may end up with a ticket as well as your insurance company may not pony up. Now with that said if your truck is rated to pull 3500lbs and your pulling 3800lbs your probably fine. If your rated to pull 3500lbs and pulling 5500lb that may be an issue. Just remember its not the ability of the truck to pull the weight its the trucks ability to stop the weight.
     
  2. Oct 1, 2011 at 5:46 AM
    #22
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free Since 1983

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    I don't mean to be disrespectful but it's hard to believe you're a LEO based on that response... you're basically telling people screw what the GCVWR sticker says and as long as you have the receiver, go ahead and haul up to the 6,500 lb weight limit of a Tacoma with a tow package. I agree that there is nothing structurally that allows the tow package to be rated 3,000 lbs higher than a non-tow package but legally that fact is irrelevent. If you get into an accident and you're legally overloaded, good luck, you're going to get taken for a ride and you can't honestly tell me as a LEO that you wouldn't ticket in that situation.

    Again, you're correct, realistically there are no differences between a tow package and a non tow package with a class 4 receiver that would allow for the 3,000 lb difference in capacity. Legally, there is a sticker that limits a non-tow package equipped Tacoma to 3,500 lbs and the addition of a receiver doesn't change the legal side of it.
     
  3. Oct 1, 2011 at 6:04 AM
    #23
    matts11

    matts11 Well-Known Member

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    Guys, don't get too wrapped up in what the GVWR sticker says. In a lawsuit post accident the defendant will not have a hard time prevailing as long as he can show he added a hitch rated to tow the trailer and not exceeding the maximum capability of his vehicle (in this case 6500 lbs). I am not saying it would stop you from being sued, but if they are suing you strictly for over weighting the vehilce you could easily get that dismissed by showing you made the modifications to get the vehicle to meet the higher rating. If you are are worried about insurance just call you company and ask them. Chances are they are either going to be dicks and say no you won't be covered or very lenient and possibly ask for verification of the rating of the hitch. Either way, your liability in a lawsuit is really going to be based upon driving to fast, not having the trailer lights/brakes operable, etc. From a practical standpoint, I would recommend using 4 low if you are manuevering on a steep hill as it is much easier on the clutch.
     
  4. Oct 1, 2011 at 7:41 AM
    #24
    Toyota Man

    Toyota Man Toyota Man

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    I am not telling him to break the law. I wouldn't be doing my job if I did that. What I am saying is that once he has made the modifications to his truck by installing the tow package ie. Hitch, trailer brakes ect. Their is no reason he can't tow what the max rating is allowed for this truck. You guys are not making sense telling him that 3500 lbs is the limit no matter what, so what you want him to sell his truck to buy one with a dealer hitch. Crazy
     
  5. Oct 1, 2011 at 7:51 AM
    #25
    Natetroknot

    Natetroknot I come from a long line of Conga dancers.

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    Get your camper loaded with supplies, some wood in the bed of your pickup, a full tank of gas, and your family in the truck and you're hauling some serious weight around. I'd guess somewhere around 1000 lbs more than the 3,700 lbs the camper weighs.

    The heaviest I've hauled (without trailer brake controls, however I do have the OEM tow package and an AAL) is 3800 lbs. It was across town, 10 miles max. I wouldn't have wanted to hit the highway or make a sudden stop with that weight behind me.

    I have several years of experience of semi truck driving, a current class A CDL, as well as experience hauling much lighter trailers with snowmobiles and riding lawn mowers with the taco.

    My own personal opinion is you're in way over your head (and your trucks) if you haul that sucker around, even if you bolt on and wire up the proper equipment.

    Just my opinion. Take it or leave it.
     
  6. Oct 1, 2011 at 7:55 AM
    #26
    97yota4wd

    97yota4wd Well-Known Member

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    caged, camburg long travel, 50t leafpack (soon to be installed) light rack over cab, 5pt harnesses etc

    3500 lbs is the "max" for his truck no matter what is installed. thats how it is.

    but OP i would pull it lol, i wouldnt stress over it. like pugga said the 3000lb difference is bs, get a class 4 hitch and brake controller and i would do it..

    my step dad pulls like 5000 lbs over the legal limit for his truck. just dont drive like a jackass and you will be fine
     
  7. Oct 1, 2011 at 8:40 AM
    #27
    10851

    10851 Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Toyota Man... Guys.. Go out and look at what is embossed on the “rear” factory bumper, right next to the license plate. You will see the tow rating is 3500 lbs. The reason the truck without the tow package is only rated for 3500 lbs. is because they assume the bumper is the ball mount. If the vehicle owner installs the same class hitch that is included with the factory tow package, the tow rating of the vehicle will be the same as the one with the tow package. The factory tow package includes a class IV receiver, 130 amp alternator, group 27 battery, transmission cooler (automatics), 7-pin wire harness, and wire harness for the electronic brake controller. I am not sure if the turn signal flasher units are different… The brakes, gear ratio, tire rating, engine hp and transmission are the same for both trucks… (Non-tow package vs. Tow package)
    230, to answer your question about your truck being able to tow that trailer… Technically yes, after your truck is properly equipped. However; I would not recommend towing that big of a trailer. I tend to go for the over-kill when it comes to safety; these trucks are light duty vehicles. You can be the safest driver on the highway, but you have no control over wind, weather, road surface condition or the actions of other drivers. I’m sure you have heard the phrase… the tail is wagging the dog… I wish you the best!!
     
  8. Oct 1, 2011 at 8:56 AM
    #28
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free Since 1983

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    I never told him not to do it, but the OP should at least know he's over the legal limit for his vehicle. Regardless of what you put on the truck, the max rating for a non-tow package equipped Tacoma is 3,500, end of story. You can properly equip the Tacoma and safely tow over the 3,500 lb stated limit but it doesn't mean you're legal when you do it. Unless you get into an accident, it most likely would never be brought into question.
     
  9. Oct 1, 2011 at 9:05 AM
    #29
    coop1212

    coop1212 Well-Known Member

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    I have 4.0 v6 2010 crew. Talked with camper dealer about a camper that was 4600 pds dry. Loaded up another 1100 pds. He said I could pull it but Problay local only.+-50 range. Said long trips would be tough! I have factory tow package too. He did say I needed add. Brakes and sway also. Still research ing
     
  10. Oct 8, 2011 at 7:02 PM
    #30
    USAONE

    USAONE Well-Known Member

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    I had a 2001 4x4 tacoma and a 18 foot pioneer that went around 4000LBS. You have yo be very careful here. My V6 pulled it ok but you will really put wear on the clutch. It is easy to add several hundred pounds cargo and not realize it. If cost or space is no problem get an airstream bambi or other lighter fiberglass camper. I had a brake controler and hitch with tow bars (A must). Another consideration is the miles to camping area. I went from an 18 foot & taco to a F150 and 30 footer to a F250 PSD and 5th Wheel. The F250 FX4 had no problem even in mountains. Campers are like boats, you can spend a lot before you tire and sell them for half you have in them. One thing for sure, it is not wise to exceed the limits of your tow vehicle. Loss of control can happen quickly and have very bad results for you and others on the road. Whatever you choose, be safe.
     
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