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Will this fit?

Discussion in 'Photography' started by sliverworm, Apr 2, 2009.

  1. Apr 2, 2009 at 6:10 AM
    #1
    sliverworm

    sliverworm [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I am still new to the photography world, I have a Nikon D40 kit with the stock lens, I was looking to upgrade but I can't figure out what kind of connection I have to to put on a different lens, I can't imagine I can only use Nikon lenses , so can somebody help me either figure out what kind of lenses I need to see if these fit or any other lens fits.

    http://www.1saleaday.com/ under the deal of the day..
     
  2. Apr 2, 2009 at 9:08 AM
    #2
    Chickenmunga

    Chickenmunga Nuggety

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    You are better off not knowing. I did 5 minutes of research and it sounds like you'd be better off with a disposable camera.
     
  3. Apr 2, 2009 at 9:21 AM
    #3
    JPinCowtown

    JPinCowtown Well-Known Member

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    The only lens that will work is one made by Nikon or one from an aftermarket company (Sigma, for example) that is made specifically for Nikon. In photography "good glass' is where all the big money is spent. I also have a Nikon D40 and the first lens I bought was more expensive than the camera - a Nikon 18-200. I'm not even sure what that thing is you linked to but I can't imagine it doing what you want it to.
     
  4. Apr 2, 2009 at 9:53 AM
    #4
    sliverworm

    sliverworm [OP] Well-Known Member

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    So, its pretty much proprietary lenses for Nikons, and a handful of aftermarket?
     
  5. Apr 2, 2009 at 9:56 AM
    #5
    Chickenmunga

    Chickenmunga Nuggety

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    Agreed. I talked to a few pros before buying, they all said that the largest percentage of your budget should be on lenses (a good lens is something you will never replace). Remember that the camera body is a computer, and will quickly become old - that's just how technology works.
    I got my lens used, new the lens would be worth 3 times the value of my camera body.


    It's a set of a few lenses. One of them is supposed to be some 37mm wide angle. Did a quick read and apparently it causes so much fisheye distortion that you will be cranking on the vigenette during post processing to hide the awfulness.
    The other is a 2x teleconverter, which you use in addition to a lens such as a telephoto. You would have to make sure that the teleconverter works with the intended lens.


    Here are the equivalent Nikon products:
    Wide Angle. This isn't exactly the same, but it's much higher quality. I've played with Canon's 14mm and it takes some real experience to get what you want. I'd imagine a 10mm is even harder.


    Teleconverter. Again, note that this is not a lens by itself, and it is compatible with only certain other lenses (check the chart).



    Being new, I would suggest a lens that can 'do everything', as in cover both wide shots and also provide some telephoto capabilities. If you want to go with Nikon, try the Nikkor 24-120mm/3.5 or the 18-200/3.5. These can be spendy, so a more conservative setup would be a Sigma 28-300/3.5 or a Tamron AF18-270/3.5.
    Being a Canon guy, I don't know who your other suppliers would be. I can say that the difference between a Canon lens and a Tamron is noticeable in terms of build quality - internal and external - but there's also a big price difference.
    If possible, always spring for any vibration compensation/stability control technology, and attempt to get the lens with the lowest F-stop possible (that's the '3.5' value I keep listing after the mm.) This allows you to use the camera in darker settings and still achieve a decent picture. For example, my lens can do down to F/4 at 24mm. If I'm in a Denny's restaurant at night, I would leave this lens home and borrow my friend's 85mm/1.2. At F/1.2, I can utilize more natural light without flash assistance.
     
  6. Apr 2, 2009 at 10:04 AM
    #6
    JPinCowtown

    JPinCowtown Well-Known Member

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  7. Apr 2, 2009 at 10:35 AM
    #7
    sliverworm

    sliverworm [OP] Well-Known Member

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    awesome, thanks alot.
     
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