1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Wood in bed or trailer?

Discussion in 'Towing' started by printman2000, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. Nov 17, 2011 at 10:52 AM
    #1
    printman2000

    printman2000 [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2010
    Member:
    #41446
    Messages:
    49
    Gender:
    Male
    Amarillo, Tx
    Vehicle:
    09 Double Cab TRD
    We are going camping for Thanksgiving. I haul a small trailer (5x8 I think). We use to to take our camping gear in. Nothing heavy. My truck pulled it fin last year.

    I also take about a 1/8th cord of wood (the heaviest part of the load). Last year I put this in the front of the trailer. I was wondering if it would be better to put it in the bed of the truck instead?

    What do you think? Bed or trailer? Or does not matter?
     
  2. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:01 AM
    #2
    Tigahshark

    Tigahshark Senior NEWBIE

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2011
    Member:
    #61688
    Messages:
    8,255
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Isaac
    On a volcano, literally!
    Vehicle:
    2011 DC TRD off road 4X4
    Tint Weathertech floor liner, weathertech window visor Roll n lock tonneau cover Rubber bed mat Smoked license plate covers
    Well i dont think it really matters as long as you load it properly in the bed or the trailer, i would probably put it in the bed cause its easier for the truck to carry something then to pull something. But only 1/8 cord thats not any real weight for you to be worried about
     
  3. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:03 AM
    #3
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Member:
    #39131
    Messages:
    30,821
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Mike
    Massachusetts
    Vehicle:
    '13 Ford F-150 SCREW
    F-150 Mod
    If you're towing the trailer regardless, I'd put the wood in the trailer.
     
  4. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:09 AM
    #4
    pudge151

    pudge151 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2010
    Member:
    #34558
    Messages:
    3,388
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Sean
    Connecticut
    Vehicle:
    08 TRD Sport
    5100's @ .85, Custom Grill, Debadged, Bestop Supertop, BHLM, DDM 4500k HID heads, Nokya 2500k fogs, LED interior lights, Weathertech Mats...
    trailer will prob haul in better with less sag, but if you need portability at your camp site then put it in the truck
     
  5. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:11 AM
    #5
    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2007
    Member:
    #1138
    Messages:
    14,254
    Gender:
    Female
    First Name:
    Jandy
    Lancaster, PA
    Vehicle:
    2016 GMC Canyon SLT w/ LineX and....
    Assuming you're going camping and will 'unhook' the trailer at the campsite.

    Put the wood in the trailer ....or else you'll have to carry it around with you everywhere you go after you've setup camp. Assuming you'll need to drive somewhere after you setup the campsite.
     
  6. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:31 AM
    #6
    skytower

    skytower Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2010
    Member:
    #38505
    Messages:
    3,228
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Dave
    virginia
    Vehicle:
    08 Tacoma 4x4
    Hitch and wiring, aux back-up light, rear strobe lights, radio and underseat sub.
    Make sure you are legal to haul wood. Some areas have quarrantines for firewood due to invasive, tree killing bugs ie, Emerald Ash Borer. In some areas, like Ohio, there are large fines.
    It really won't matter if you load it in the truck or trailer, just where in each you load it will make a difference.
     
  7. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:33 AM
    #7
    printman2000

    printman2000 [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2010
    Member:
    #41446
    Messages:
    49
    Gender:
    Male
    Amarillo, Tx
    Vehicle:
    09 Double Cab TRD
    Thanks everyone. Think I will stick with putting in the trailer.

    It should be in the front of the trailer, right? Since it is the heaviest thing we take?
     
  8. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:35 AM
    #8
    jflan

    jflan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Member:
    #11901
    Messages:
    1,013
    Vancouver, WA
    Vehicle:
    09 Access 4x4 2.7L manual SR5
    SnugTop SuperSport Sportsman keyless cap Weathertech mats - OEM skidplate - OEM hitch
    With that small amount it probably doesn't matter.

    With heavier stuff it does.

    We used to use pickups and trailers to move construction supplies/equipment.
    The guys would sometimes make the mistake of loading the truck first and then they would connect to the trailer and down she would go.
    Then they would have to take weight out of the truck to bring it back up.

    Load the trailer properly (60/40 front to back) and then connect to the truck.
    Load the truck.
     
  9. Nov 17, 2011 at 11:45 AM
    #9
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2010
    Member:
    #39131
    Messages:
    30,821
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Mike
    Massachusetts
    Vehicle:
    '13 Ford F-150 SCREW
    F-150 Mod
    Assuming the wood is heavier than the camping gear, stack the wood across the front of the trailer and load the camping gear behind it.
     
  10. Nov 17, 2011 at 12:20 PM
    #10
    jflan

    jflan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Member:
    #11901
    Messages:
    1,013
    Vancouver, WA
    Vehicle:
    09 Access 4x4 2.7L manual SR5
    SnugTop SuperSport Sportsman keyless cap Weathertech mats - OEM skidplate - OEM hitch
    Yeah, you want a little more weight in front of trailer's axle.
    If there is too much weight behind the trailer's axle you could get some fish tail action.

    One way to keep an eye on things is to measure the truck's bumper height while everything is empty. Hook up the empty trailer and start loading while watching that bumper height.
    I don't think I'd want to sink it more than 1-1/2" - 2" but each rig will have it's own sweet spot depending on your suspension.
     
To Top