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1st Gen rear drum brake pad replacement

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by 186000mps, May 27, 2012.

  1. May 27, 2012 at 2:12 PM
    #1
    186000mps

    186000mps [OP] ..Slingin' up mud and we're scarying off bunnies..

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    Hi folks,
    I have used the search feature to research this here as well as looked at a few videos on youtube regarding replacing the rear brake shoes (edit). What I have seen are quite a few specific brake tools for the rear vs the front. I have the rear brake shoes and would like to do this myself. Are all these tools necessary or are there basic tool solutions?
    Also, have there been any write-ups on this? I could not find anything specific.
    Thanks for your help as always.
     
  2. May 27, 2012 at 2:34 PM
    #2
    tan4x4

    tan4x4 Well-Known Member

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    For rear DRUM brakes, they are called SHOES, not PADS.
    I'm assuming you have not done this before.

    Compared to pads, they are a pain to replace. Lots of parts to deal with. I recommend that you jack up the entire rear end, both wheels, and take both drums off first. Then, do one side completely. You then have the other side as a reference to how the parts all go together. One is a left-right 'mirror' of the other.

    You might need an adjuster tool, but a stubby screwdriver can work. The adjuster hole is above the axle on the backing plate, and awkward to get to. Rear brakes are self-adjusting after install, but an initial adjustment just after installation is needed.

    There is also a special tool to compress and rotate the spring keepers that hold the shoes in place. It can be done with a needle nose, but much easier with the special brake tool. If you have a Haynes manual that can help.

    Good luck.
     
  3. May 27, 2012 at 4:35 PM
    #3
    186000mps

    186000mps [OP] ..Slingin' up mud and we're scarying off bunnies..

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    Bilstein 5100's, Toytec front adjustable coilover kit, Exporear leafs, Fox resi rears, Slotted & Drilled front rotors, 33x12.50 BFG ATs on Outlaw II 15 x 10s, Bushwacker cutout flares, K&N cold air intake with aluminum sheathing water baffles, ARB bumper with XD9000 winch with wireless remote, IPF 900XS lights, Flowmaster cat-back exhaust, Rhino bed liner, UWS gullwing toolbox with tools and recovery gear. 48" Hi-Lift Jack secured under toolbox.
    ^ thx
    Done front and back discs quite a few times but this is the first time on this vehicle for the rear drums.
     
  4. May 28, 2012 at 7:14 AM
    #4
    CrutchfieldDarren

    CrutchfieldDarren Well-Known Member Vendor

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    One tip on removing Toyota drums. After you remove the wheel look for two threaded holes on the drum, behind these holes is the axle/hub. If you get two decent length metric bolts, m6x1.25?? Screw them into these two holes until they bottom out, then start turning each bolt a little at a time, this will separate the drum from the axle hub much easier than beating on it with a hammer like I have had to do with other makes.

    Hope this helps!
     
  5. May 28, 2012 at 8:25 AM
    #5
    Robertgeejr1

    Robertgeejr1 Well-Known Member

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    Aorora, Ill, yeah!
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    I have done all the hi-pro mods for a life time, since I got this truck at a great price, I will be happy with showroom new.
    man, if you will let me, let a old man give you some advice:
    Drums are a pain in the ass. they are nothing at all like disk brakes, and if you don't know what you are doing, it can become a mess. plus you just never know what you are going to get into when you take the drums off. lots of little parts that do wear out and might have to be replaced, and they do tend to get rusted up over time. when my uncle built trailers, and we did repairs, on trailer brakes, we just put new backing plates on because of all the above and the time it would save.
    if you know of a really good shop that does brakes, order the best shoes and brake drums you can get, for me I like Raybestos, but thats me, because if done right they will last for a long time.
    remember, on pick-ups, your front brakes do about 70% of the work, (all the weight is on the front) so most likely you get a 3 to 1 or 4 to 1 change ratio, front and rear brakes, they do last that long, thats why I don't mind paying someone good to do it, and to buy a new drum so its fresh and not resurface the old one. and if you do it yourself mind the drum's surface, sometimes they get steel spinters on edges, I had a 2" one go under my thumb nail. ouch!
     
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