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2012 Tacoma Secondary Air pump or Air Injection Valves Worries

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by redrock95, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. Sep 6, 2017 at 10:46 PM
    #1
    redrock95

    redrock95 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Hi All,
    So I have seen a couple threads regarding this issue with the secondary air pump and the air injection valves. I understand what these parts do and I understand the issues people have been reporting as a result of these parts. I understand that I am probably more worried about it than I need to be being that I do look at the forums where members problems get reported more frequently than and are subsequently bitched about more than in real life.

    Basically what worries me with these issues is that I spend a lot of time out in the boonies being that I live in the beautiful intermountain west. I am out, almost, every weekend in remote areas of the country where if something were to break I am out of cell service and help is a long ways a way. I am worried about what I would do if any of these issues were to arise while I was out there. Basically what I would like is some insight as to what I can do to prevent this issue, or rather what I could do to remedy this situation if it were to happen while I was out in the backcountry (buy a bypass kit and keep it in the truck, keep spare parts on hand, etc.).

    I bought this truck simply because I know how reliable they can be and I needed a rugged vehicle that was capable of carrying all my fishing, biking, camping, skiing, and rafting shit onto rough 4x4 backcountry roads. And I see all this shit regarding the issues people have been having and it makes me nervous enough that the thought to sell the 2012 and upgrade to a 2013-15 is starting to become a option in my mind, even though I freaking love my truck ! :confused::confused::confused: The thing is I have the exact truck I want and I know how tough it is going to be to try and find a comparable, albeit slighty newer vehicle in the exact configuration that I have (2012 AC TRD OR, 4.0, 6spd).

    Thanks for reading folks, maybe I am just being a worry wort but damn I know how bad it would suck to break down in some of the spots that I like to frequent.
     
  2. Sep 7, 2017 at 4:35 AM
    #2
    sioux

    sioux Well-Known Member

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    I've had the same concern. Granted I haven't had the issue yet, I think you (we) basically have two options.
    1. proactively replace the valves (If I replace mine I'm considering the sub $200 Tundra ones), or
    2. Carry a code reader and reset the codes to get you out of limp mode, allowing you to get out of the boonies.

    Option 2 is the route I've been going and obviously not a fix. I'm just hoping it would at least get me back to civilization if the issue occurs when I'm in the backcountry.
     
  3. Sep 7, 2017 at 5:06 AM
    #3
    Clearwater Bill

    Clearwater Bill Retire from work, but not from life.

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    A few OE parts from fancy trucks
    1st off, you need to be prepared for recovery from anything. This is a comparatively minor issue (frequency wise), and the truck can be shut down from a much broader number of very common reasons. It's just the way mechanical things are. I'm sure you don't carry a spare of every part that could fail and leave you stranded. So another plan is in order.

    Like boaters and aircraft, maybe you need to file a 'trip plan' with someone, including planned route and return schedule, so someone can come looking if you don't reappear. I had a friend fall out of a tree stand and shatter a leg. His truck ran fine, he just couldn't drive it.

    As to the specific concern you have, mileage seems to play a factor (you don't mention yours) and I'm sure a bit of luck.

    Here is a great thread on a DIY fix. It could be that something like this would be reasonable PM at a moderate mileage. Or at least disassembly and cleaning..........

    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads...-air-injection-system-p2440-and-p2442.480436/
     
    uwu, redrock95 [OP] and buzzkill911 like this.
  4. Sep 7, 2017 at 5:11 AM
    #4
    jbrnigan

    jbrnigan Well-Known Member

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    Yep
    This ^^^^^
     
  5. Sep 7, 2017 at 7:17 AM
    #5
    buzzkill911

    buzzkill911 Desk pilot

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    Stay tuned...
  6. Sep 7, 2017 at 8:01 AM
    #6
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    Grab an 8 dollar Bluetooth OBD adapter and just keep it plugged in so you can clear codes on your phone. Simple solution to being stranded.

    Do yourself a favor, take the 5 min to remove the shit stock foam filter from inside the pump and put a 1in uni crank case breather on the inlet and you likely wont have a problem.
     
    redrock95 [OP] likes this.
  7. Sep 7, 2017 at 8:54 AM
    #7
    redrock95

    redrock95 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    @Clearwater Bill Good point man. I know that I have to be prepared for anything to happen but quite frankly that is the reason why I bought this truck. The frequency that mechanical failures happen is just so damn low. This is why I am concerned about this stupid ass problem. As to the contingency plan, I am usually pretty good about that sort of stuff but the fact is, stuff changes while your out there. Maybe the road I planned on taking is snowed in, so I have to take an alternate, maybe the fishing is better on that other river, you catch my drift? I am at 71,000 on my truck.

    @buzzkill911 I like the idea of the spot, I use those in my line of work and have had to activate the emergency response once and it actually ended up saving one of my co-workers lives... I just haven't thought to buy one for myself yet.

    @nd4spdbh Yeah man I think that is going to be the course of action for right now. Buy and obd code reader and do the 1in crank breather mod.
     
  8. Sep 7, 2017 at 9:14 AM
    #8
    sioux

    sioux Well-Known Member

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    ^ This is exactly what I did. I replaced the foam filter because it was simple and cheap. I have a Kiwi3 OBD adapter and use OBD Fusion on my phone. I didn't buy the wireless OBD specifically for this problem; actually bought it to read trans temps. But none the less, it's there and can clear/read codes if needed.

    I'm hoping in the long run, I'm either one of the few who never have this problem, or Toyota finally does a recall for the 2012 valves. Not necessarily holding my breath for either outcome though.
     
  9. Sep 7, 2017 at 10:12 AM
    #9
    uwu

    uwu Well-Known Member

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    Check out the Garmin inReach or SPOT iridium satellite messengers.
     
  10. Sep 7, 2017 at 10:13 AM
    #10
    uwu

    uwu Well-Known Member

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    oops you beat me to it :D

    I went with the garmin to have the topo maps.
     
  11. Sep 7, 2017 at 10:19 AM
    #11
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    same here... i grabbed the ELM 327 bluetooth obd to get trans temps / info etc. Just so happens to be nice n small and if i do need to clear a code i can easily do it..... I gotta clear a code each time i flip my fun switch.... (locker in 2wd) haha.
     
  12. Sep 7, 2017 at 10:48 AM
    #12
    taco2010trd

    taco2010trd Cyber Bully

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    Sorry off topic but that obd will give me transmission temps? I assume if I change trans fluid this will work for the process to check level? Looks like it's only $7?

    Let me know, thanks.
     
    syswalla likes this.
  13. Sep 7, 2017 at 4:24 PM
    #13
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    The bluetooth OBD adapter simply feeds the phone data, you have to have the proper app on your phone / tablet to be able to parse the data. In my case, Torque Pro with custom PID's / functions setup to get trans pan and torque converter output temps.

    You could use it to do the level check process, but its almost just easier to do the jumper wire.
     
    taco2010trd likes this.

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