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2019 TPMS tool compatibility?

Discussion in '3rd Gen. Tacomas (2016+)' started by tpb, Sep 29, 2019.

  1. Sep 29, 2019 at 11:44 AM
    #1
    tpb

    tpb [OP] New Member

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    Are there any differences in TPMS sensor & tool compatibility among the 3rd Gens? I've found some TPMS tools that are reported to work for the 2016's, but before a drop a couple hundred bucks on a tool I'd like to know if it's going to work properly on the 2019.

    When I was talking with the dealership they said that the 2019 was "different" and it was either take it to them twice a year to reset the TPMS ($100 each time, ouch) or else just have the light on all the time. This smells of B.S.

    I'm in Winter / Summer TPMS swap hell. It looks like the Autel TS601 will be able to scan the OEM sensors on the second set of rims and poke the ECU through ODB2 to make the Taco happy. Any gotchas that I should know about?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Sep 29, 2019 at 12:11 PM
    #2
    daddy_o

    daddy_o Well-Known Member

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    I would not trust the dealership on that. What could they have done different.
    Check Carista app, they added TPMS recently, and going through the selection it only asks for the generation. There is not a different selection for 2019. Plus, you can do other things with Carista if you need to.
    It may or may not be worth it to you, but before dropping 300 dollars on a tool to use twice a year, it wouldn't hurt to check it out.
     
    SC4333 and tonered like this.
  3. Sep 29, 2019 at 12:16 PM
    #3
    tonered

    tonered tacorider

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    You could also grab a Tractrix adapter for $170 and then load up a free copy of TechStream. You would have all the power of the dealership in your own driveway including ECU updates and such.
     
    SC4333 and daddy_o like this.
  4. Sep 29, 2019 at 12:21 PM
    #4
    Bishop84

    Bishop84 Well-Known Member

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    The 2016+ are harder to scan with generic tools.

    We sell TPMS clones, so both sets of rims have the same TPMS # and never needs to be programmed.
     
    tonered likes this.
  5. Sep 29, 2019 at 12:26 PM
    #5
    dustxking

    dustxking Well-Known Member

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    If you have two sets of Sensors, why not just drive to your local Discount tire and have them reset it for free?
     
  6. Sep 29, 2019 at 2:53 PM
    #6
    Can't Blame The Dog

    Can't Blame The Dog Member

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    Two year quiet lurker. I had the same issue as you. I bought 4 stock rims on Craigslist, bought 4 OE TPMS sensors from TireRack, bought 4 new Blizzack tires from NTW during spring and summer 2018. I have had 3 OBDII readers. My current programmer/ reader is the MaxiTPMS601. I figured it would pay for itself in few years. TS601 programmed my 2018 Tacoma with no issues for the winter of 2018/19, and back to the original summer set in the spring. It has not failed reading any TPMS sensors on any car that I have tested or for CEL Diagnostics testing. Helping all the neighbor makes it worth a lot more.
     
  7. Sep 29, 2019 at 3:19 PM
    #7
    eurowner

    eurowner Duke Sky

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    I read somewhere here that the Alligator Sensi It system was able to clone OEM numbers to its TPMS. I can't find that thread.
     
  8. Sep 29, 2019 at 5:15 PM
    #8
    Can't Blame The Dog

    Can't Blame The Dog Member

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    I thought about the cloning. I couldn't get a good satisfying answers on the risk they would or wouldn't work. Battery life on the clones were about 5-7 years, special programmer needed to give the sensor a value, The exact Toyota TPMS sensor from TireRack complete was about $42 ea with spec'ed longer battery life. Plus, my older OBDII readers were not upto snuff on the new car computers. The TS601 will program sensors, but only theirs. Autel sensors weren't much less than the OE, I didn't want the failure risk.
     
  9. Oct 13, 2019 at 2:18 PM
    #9
    tpb

    tpb [OP] New Member

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