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A word about race radios

Discussion in 'Southern California' started by Crom, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. Crom

    Crom [OP] Time is precious; use it wisely

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    This is just and FYI for those that may not know. And the bottom line first...

    You may not use a VHF radio in the United States without a valid FCC-issued license or Amateur radio license. Use of VHF radios in Mexico is allowed during the SCORE Baja race, and subject to local regulations.

    Here is an example of VHF itinerant/business band frequencies commonly used in the Baja Races. Operators of the frequencies are licensed. If you transmit on frequencies you're not licensed for, then you are operating a pirate radio station, and are subject to fines and equipment confiscation. :(

    I have observed a trend of individuals buying ham radios and modifying them to transmit outside the ham bands. That in of itself is not a problem. But if you key up outside the ham bands--that's illegal, and you put yourself at risk for fines and confiscation (more on that below). Also problematic is buying business band radios and operating them on frequencies without the requisite license.

    Some people think the FCC enforcement is a toothless tiger, and nothing bad will happen to them, and maybe that's all true. But people should know that there are risks involved. And that's why I took the time to write this, as to inform people. I don't care what you do in the desert as long as it doesn't hurt or interfere with other people.

    Also, I think it's incredibly foolish for people to post in a public forum the date, time, and place of a future meet and the illegal frequency they'll be communicating on. :laugh:

    If you have questions about Race radios, I have found this shop to be very helpful. PCI Race Radios. As it turns out they are the itinerant and properly licensed operator of the Weatherman frequency.

    Additionally, if your not a properly licensed amateur operator please stay off the 2M & 70cm ham bands, i.e. 144-148 & 430-450 Mhz. :)

    Finally, WB4CS--a licensed amateur radio operator wrote the FCC asking a question and the answer is relevant to the topic here.

    Here is what the FCC wrote:

    There are many useful legal ways of communicating on trail rides, and I encourage all who are interested to fully explore their legal options. :D

    For example:

    1. CB
    2. FRS
    3. Licensed GMRS
    4. MURS
    5. Licensed Amateur radio (HAM).
    -Crom
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2013
  2. lembowski

    lembowski Rompin Around

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  3. The Traveler

    The Traveler REBELTACO

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    This is my I got my license and operate on ham frequencies usually.

    But I am guilty of keying up on commercial band to communicate with coworkers at company affairs.
     
  4. SoCaltaco65

    SoCaltaco65 Well-Known Member

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    Interesting your link shows a radio for sale with statements like: Icom F5021 Chase Package Chase Truck / Base Camp Radio Whether you’re part of a race team or out playing with friends the PCI Chase Package is a great way to stay in contact. Great for base camp set ups or chase vehicles.
    http://www.pciraceradios.com/SPD/ic...ck---base-camp-radio--8354435058437619969.jsp


    Interesting phone call asking about the package too.


    likewise MURS is VHF
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-Use_Radio_Service
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
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