1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Alternator whining in amped speakers.

Discussion in 'Audio & Video' started by mrp192, Oct 31, 2010.

  1. Oct 31, 2010 at 9:14 PM
    #1
    mrp192

    mrp192 [OP] REALLY!!

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Member:
    #13911
    Messages:
    739
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brent
    Cheney WA
    Vehicle:
    98 V6 4x4 limited
    Stereo, boobies
    Alright ive been getting alternator whining the my speakers.. Yea I know its my ground.. well it shouldnt be anymore.. Ive grounded the amps straight to the frame.. I have also ran a 4G wire from the ground point to the neg on the battery.. I still have whining.. I have also tried just having the amps grounded to the battery nothing to the frame and it just got worse.. So im wondering could my engine have a bad ground? the engine starts up fine. So im just at a lot on what i can do..
     
  2. Oct 31, 2010 at 9:55 PM
    #2
    mrp192

    mrp192 [OP] REALLY!!

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Member:
    #13911
    Messages:
    739
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brent
    Cheney WA
    Vehicle:
    98 V6 4x4 limited
    Stereo, boobies
    BADASS thanks alot!!
     
  3. Oct 31, 2010 at 10:17 PM
    #3
    PSUnick

    PSUnick Lets Go State!

    Joined:
    May 23, 2009
    Member:
    #17556
    Messages:
    169
    Gender:
    Male
    MA
    Vehicle:
    2007 AC 4x4 Sport
    Usually alternator whine is caused by the headunit ground being at some small voltage potential compared to the external amplifiers ground. This causes some current to flow on the return of the RCA connections to the amplifiers.

    I would recommend grounding the amplifiers directly to the frame, and not run a long lead to the battery. The long lead could develop a voltage drop and cause more problems than its worth. Then I would try the following:

    1) Ground the headunit directly to the frame; do not use the factory headunit ground in the wiring harness. The wiring harness ground can be long in length, and go through several connectors on its way to the battery negative terminal. This is the solution for most systems.

    2) Ground the headunit to the same bolt as the amplifiers. Ideally this would be done with the smallest wire length possible, but in practice that usually can't be done. For longer lengths use larger diameter wire.

    3) Use a ground loop isolator, as wolfpack as indicated, on the RCA's. Typically a last resort, when all else fails.


    Of course, make sure you have good crimps or soldered joints on all your ground leads.
     
  4. Oct 31, 2010 at 10:34 PM
    #4
    mrp192

    mrp192 [OP] REALLY!!

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Member:
    #13911
    Messages:
    739
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brent
    Cheney WA
    Vehicle:
    98 V6 4x4 limited
    Stereo, boobies
    Cool I'll try that wed when I get back from work.
     
  5. Nov 3, 2010 at 9:59 PM
    #5
    mrp192

    mrp192 [OP] REALLY!!

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Member:
    #13911
    Messages:
    739
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brent
    Cheney WA
    Vehicle:
    98 V6 4x4 limited
    Stereo, boobies
    Alright so grounding my head unit to a different place basically did it. there is def alot less. later on ill get the ground loop isolater. then maybe a 5 channel AMP
     
To Top