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Antifreeze / Coolant - Red, Pink, Green ???

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas (1995-2004)' started by Old Soul 76, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. Oct 10, 2012 at 6:13 PM
    #1
    Old Soul 76

    Old Soul 76 [OP] Active Member

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    I've been looking for a thread that simply states the differences, and couldn't find one

    I want to know...

    What is the difference between red, pink, and green antifreeze (collant, radiator fluid, etc.)?

    Red -

    Pink-

    Green-

    AND

    Which should be used in a 1st gen tacoma?
    (specifically a '99)
     
  2. Oct 10, 2012 at 6:57 PM
    #2
    TACO TX

    TACO TX Well-Known Member

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    I would use good 'ol green. Orange is GM, red goes in tranmission, and nothing pink is going near my truck other than the the wifes guns.:D
     
  3. Oct 10, 2012 at 6:58 PM
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    2000GTacoma

    2000GTacoma Well-Known Member

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    oem is pink if i recall correctly
     
  4. Oct 10, 2012 at 7:25 PM
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    MtnDon

    MtnDon Member

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    More than you asked for.... :)

    In recent years, there have been many changes, given the new developments in the area of engine coolant. Several manufacturers are specifying their own type of antifreeze, and it can be confusing to the consumer as to which color or formulation of coolant is acceptable for their car. Some European coolants are based on a different pH scale from those made for American cars, because of the differences in plain water between the two continents. This adds to the consumer's confusion.

    All antifreeze falls under one of three basic types.

    Inorganic Acid Technology (IAT) This is the common green stuff original equipment manufacturers have used for over 70 years. Ethylene glycol is its base chemical, and there are silicate and phosphate additives that make it compatible with copper, brass, cast-iron and aluminum cooling system components. Manufacturers recommended that you change the green IAT antifreeze every 36,000 miles or three years. IAT coolant was used in GM vehicles until 1994. Chrysler used green IAT fluid until 2001, as did Ford (with the exception of some 1999 models that used OAT blue coolant which must be purchased from Ford).

    Organic Acid Technology (OAT) Commonly referred in GM vehicles by the brand name, Dex-Cool or to other manufacturers as propylene glycol. GM introduced Dex-Cool in 1995 as an "extended life" coolant, though most GM car owners and repair shops are finding that Dex-Cool is good for only about three to five years before it needs to be replaced. But because of the additives in the Dex-Cool orange antifreeze, you do not want to substitute the old reliable green coolant. Usually (but not always) dyed orange or yellow so you could tell the difference between OAT and IAT, this coolant has similar corrosion protection to the green stuff; however, it is designed to be slower acting, hence the extended-life moniker. It is made from a propylene glycol base, which makes it less poisonous than conventional IAT for children and pets. OAT, when spilled or lost due to a boil-over, is much less harmful to the environment. In addition to its use in 1996 model year and newer GM cars and trucks, OAT is also used in 1996 to 2001 Audi, Land Rover, Nissan, Mazda, Toyota, Honda, Kia, VW, Jaguar, Saab and Porsche. Manufacturers are now recommending your OAT coolant be changed every five years. OAT coolants are currently readily available from most auto parts stores.

    Hybrid Organic Acid Technology
    (HOAT)
    This coolant is usually dyed yellow but comes in other colors like green, pink, blue, red and orange, which leads to a lot of confusion. One way to know for sure if you are getting HOAT will be by the packaging. Manufacturers often refer to this antifreeze as "global" and will indicate on the bottle that it meets or exceeds the specification "G-05" for most European cars and G-11 or G-12 for Volkswagen and Audi. Hybrid antifreeze has added silicates for aluminum protection and is advertised as having a five-year change interval. Normally, HOAT coolants are specified for vehicles newer than 2002, specifically Mercedes, Volvo, Ford, VW, Audi, Chrysler, BMW and Saab.

    The use of OAT and HOAT coolants can extend the life of rubber coolant hoses, because they conduct less electrochemical degradation or ECD than the conventional green antifreeze. ECD is the process by which the motion of coolant and water through your engine creates an electrical charge similar to a galvanic battery. This electrical charge degrades both rubber and metal parts in the cooling system from the inside out. ECD can be attributed as the cause of many premature coolant system failures. Volkswagen, Audi and other European vehicles use antifreeze that can be blue, pink or red in color. Most of these are available under the brand name Pentosin in 1.5-liter bottles. The pink and red are specifically designed for alloy engines and both meet the required G-12 coolant specification. The blue is also for alloy-based engines, but with a different pH level, and is equivalent to the G-11 rating.

    You will find other types of antifreeze available for heavy-duty trucks. Both pink antifreeze (no, not the same stuff as used in the toilet in your camper at the lake house) and red are sold for truck use. These should not be confused with the pink or red HOAT coolants used on imported vehicles because they are designed specifically for trucks. These coolants will usually say "low-silicate" and "final charge" or "fleet charge" on them. They will do you no good in your passenger car because the lubrication and metal protection additives are separate in large truck cooling systems.

    So what should you use?
    Manufacturers will tell you to stick with what is in there. You can have the cooling system cleaned with a coolant filtration system. This is a very popular tool in repair shops today and will recycle your antifreeze. Component chemicals can be re-added to boost its boiling and freezing point and adjust the pH of the cooling system back to specifications. The most accurate tool for measuring OAT and HOAT potency is a refractometer, which is an expensive piece of equipment, so you should have the coolant checked by a service station before deciding whether it should be replaced or refurbished. If you are low on fluid or have a leak, a general rule of thumb is, green IAT is always replaced by green IAT coolant. Dex-Cool or an OAT product with equivalent specifications is always necessary to replace orange or yellow organic-based antifreeze. For the rainbow of colors of HOAT, your only substitute is the yellow or amber global antifreeze. Global coolant will not change the color of the stuff that is already in there. If original red, blue or pink antifreeze is desired, you must get these from a Pentosin supplier or your car dealer. Can you run organic coolant in an earlier vehicle? Yes and no. OAT will work if your radiator is aluminum and you flush your entire cooling system with water and completely refill with OAT, but there are some issues with the interaction between organic coolants and lead solder, so using OAT in a copper radiator is not recommended. In short, antifreeze these days is a buyer beware deal. Check your owner's manual for the correct fluid, and read the label on your replacement coolant carefully to ensure it meets with the required specifications.


    AND...
    Red and Pink antifreeze Toyota makes two antifreeze colors.

    Red is called "long life" antifreeze that's the color of blood.
    pn# 00272-1LLAC-01
    Concentrate; dilute with distilled water, 50/50

    Pink antifreeze is called "extended life" that comes in most new model Toyota and the Scions.
    pn# 00272-5LLC2
    pre-diluted with distilled or maybe it's de-mineralized water. Use as it is out of the jug. No further dilution
     
    Norton likes this.
  5. Oct 10, 2012 at 7:49 PM
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    MtnDon

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  6. Oct 11, 2012 at 9:48 AM
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    asus611

    asus611 Well-Known Member

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    I still use Toyota Red, which is what came with car when it was new, and is what I have been using for the past 9 years. Thought about switching over to the pink super long life, but hey, why mess with something if it isn't broken
     
  7. Feb 16, 2016 at 8:10 AM
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    kdwellssr

    kdwellssr Member

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    I don't have a manual and need to know what Toyota recommends for the 99 tacoma coolant type or color?
     
  8. Feb 16, 2016 at 9:57 AM
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    thunderone

    thunderone Senior Member

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    if you have a 1995-2003, use red and dilute 50/50. If you have a 2004, use pink (it is already diluted).

    Source: The dealer fluid guideline book
     
  9. Feb 16, 2016 at 3:54 PM
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    kdwellssr

    kdwellssr Member

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    I have two . One is 99 and one is 04. Can I use the Red it both of them? Or must I get the pink?
     
  10. Feb 16, 2016 at 8:02 PM
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    thunderone

    thunderone Senior Member

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    You don't HAVE to use pink in the 2004 if you don't want to, especially if it's going to make your life easier. But pink is what it came from the factory with.
     
  11. Feb 16, 2016 at 9:04 PM
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    CodeSeven

    CodeSeven Yo

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  12. Feb 16, 2016 at 9:20 PM
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    Norton

    Norton Senior TW Member

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    Owner's Manuals are available from the Toyota Owner's Web Site, kdwellssr.

    FWIW, page 324 of the Manual for my '04 says "'Toyota Super Long Life Coolant' is filled in your Toyota vehicle at factory fill. In order to avoid technical problems, only use 'Toyota Super Long Life Coolant' or similar high quality ethylene glycol based non-silicate, non-amine, non-nitrite, and non-borate coolant with long-life hybrid organic acid technology."
     
  13. Feb 17, 2016 at 7:59 AM
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    mwrohde

    mwrohde Well-Known Member

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    Something like that is written the manual for my Civic. I had a hell of a time finding out what coolants actually fulfill those requirements.

    For my truck, I bought Pentofrost A1.
     
  14. Feb 17, 2016 at 8:10 AM
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    Trapperr

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    Funny story about buying coolant from the dealership this week..

    Me: I need some coolant. Which of these 2 (red or pink) does my vehicle take?
    Toyota Parts Counter Guy: For your 2002? I think that just takes the plain old green stuff.
    Me: There's red coolant in there now.
    Toyota Parts Counter Guy: Then yours takes red.

    I have little to no faith in the ability of the guy at the parts counter if it isn't right up there on the screen in front of them.
     
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  15. Feb 17, 2016 at 8:18 AM
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    thunderone

    thunderone Senior Member

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  16. Feb 17, 2016 at 10:37 AM
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    mwrohde

    mwrohde Well-Known Member

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    That just further convinces me that I can't tell the difference between one and the other. I can read the words, but I don't know what they mean. I don't know what ingredients are meaningful and what aren't. I don't know what the ramifications are for the inclusion or exclusion of one or more of them.
     
  17. Feb 17, 2016 at 10:40 AM
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    thunderone

    thunderone Senior Member

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    You have an '03. So use red. Which is called "long life". Not "super long life". And make sure to dilute it 50/50 with distilled water (not tap!). That is all you need to know.
     
  18. Feb 17, 2016 at 12:57 PM
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    Trapperr

    Trapperr Well-Known Member

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    Something else that crossed my mind. The 3.4l system says it takes 10.5qts of coolant. So a gallon of long life and a gallon of distilled water equals 8qts. Are you guys dropping another $40 at the dealer to make a perfect 50/50 mix??? Or will you be ok with just using water for the last 2.5qts? I'm talking about the undiluted coolant.
     
  19. Feb 17, 2016 at 3:01 PM
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    thunderone

    thunderone Senior Member

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    You live in NV? You should be fine with a 60/40 mix then.
     
  20. Feb 17, 2016 at 8:52 PM
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    2004TacomaSR5

    2004TacomaSR5 Sentinel Prime

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    I'm a solid believer in the old green stuff. I think the deal with all these new colored coolants is a gimmick dealerships use to get you to sucker up and spend more money buying their labeled "OEM" kool-aid. My truck currently has the red/pinkish coolant in it, but when it comes time for a radiator flush, it's getting refilled with the tried and true green stuff. It's been used in all types of cars for 70+ years already, don't see why switching back to it would harm anything.
     
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