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are shims/hardware needed for a brake job?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by TacoTuesday1, Dec 4, 2019.

  1. Dec 4, 2019 at 7:58 PM
    #1
    TacoTuesday1

    TacoTuesday1 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Not sure if I'm doing my brakes too early; pads are at 6mm or less.
    The pedal bites low; Idk if this is caused by worn rotors. I already turned them on a lathe but haven't measured thickness with a caliper.

    Just ordered new OEM rotors and pads on Amazon, and read people also might use extra parts.

    Are they needed?
    Such as shims and hardware. I honestly don't know what else is in the braking system looking at the Olathe Toyota Parts catalog, but I remember when taking mine apart last time (to cut on a lathe to fix pulsation), there were such parts. I think "shim" backing plates on the pads, and hardware such as slide pins, etc.

    all of which I cleaned and lubed with anti-sieze before re-assembly.

    What are your thoughts?
    I see some posts say that it's best to buy new shim parts because they have a special anti-noise coating that wears off over time, but my brake problem seems more to be "worn low" rather than noise.

    The parts will probably add $20+ extra to the rotors and pads.

    [​IMG]

    Not sure if environment/region matters. I hear in sandy/dusty areas, to avoid the normally-used liquid brake greases, because they catch particles that become abrasive. And to install dry.
    But I also hear wet is good because it allows the parts to move freely and quietly.

    Not sure if the "shims" actually are coated, or if they're simply metal pieces that don't wear out.

    so far the rotors I got are 43512-04052
    and 04465-04070 for the pads
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    speaking of which, I don't know if the pad edges should be chamfered (sanded to an angle) or what tool is even strong enough to do that.
    Other pads usually come that way new.

    Last time I re-used the hardware (pins, etc.) I cleaned them a bit by hand, but not perfectly like I used to on a bench grinder with wire wheel disc. Because I no longer have such a tool. That thing was pretty good at cleaning rusty exhaust bolts, brake parts, etc.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Dec 4, 2019 at 10:31 PM
    #2
    Waasheem

    Waasheem Well-Known Member

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    Something I learned working on my supras, toyota pads come with new anti squeak shims, aftermarket stuff doesn't. Aftermarket pep boys pads didn't even stay where they're supposed to. So even when I switched to brembo rotors and I forget which aftermarket pads, I used Toyota's shims. There's not a coating to wear off, but sometimes the shims may have slipped out of position and got bent. If it's supposed to have shims, you'll wish you got them after listening to the noise.

    There's a shaft thats usually covered or protected by a rubber boot or seal. That shaft should be lubed with brake caliper sliding grease. The rubber boot or seal keeps dirt off of it. I had one stuck because the seal popped off, the grease dried out, so the sliding part was frozen stuck.

    Some wd40 or brake cleaner and a rag should scrub off any unwanted dried smutz on the sliding pins. If they're rusty or bent, replace them. Look at your caliper piston seals before you colapse them. If they look torn, really dried out, damaged you could try a caliper rebuild kit, or replace them. Replacing isn't cheap, rebuilding is a pain.

    Important to remember, this your brakes. The life you save may be yours, or if your precious loved ones are in the car with you.
     
  3. Dec 5, 2019 at 4:54 AM
    #3
    gotoman1969

    gotoman1969 Well-Known Member

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    Personally I wouldn’t trust Amazon, eBay OEM parts ever. Too much fake shit on those sites I don’t care what the site says.
     
  4. Dec 5, 2019 at 5:26 AM
    #4
    Fullboogie

    Fullboogie Well-Known Member

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    Most good aftermarket pads have that built in so no, you don't need to add them. But if you buy pads that look like the pic above, with bare backing plates, then yes you will need them.
     
  5. Dec 5, 2019 at 9:44 AM
    #5
    unlewser

    unlewser Well-Known Member

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    A lot of toyota dealerships have Amazon and ebay stores. It's safe as long as you check ratings.
     
  6. Dec 5, 2019 at 10:52 AM
    #6
    gotoman1969

    gotoman1969 Well-Known Member

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    If it’s the dealers store, that might be different. I could see that being better.
     
    unlewser likes this.
  7. Dec 5, 2019 at 11:12 AM
    #7
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    get the shim set.

    I did the oem rotor and pads from camelback toyota ... hit up @gunny1005 (tho he hasnt returned my PM's from a week or two ago... maybe hes on vacation). I wish i had gotten the shim kit as it would of saved alot of time n hassle from cleaning up the old ones.
     
  8. Dec 5, 2019 at 1:21 PM
    #8
    Rob MacRuger

    Rob MacRuger Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Dec 5, 2019
  9. Dec 5, 2019 at 6:02 PM
    #9
    Waasheem

    Waasheem Well-Known Member

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    You'd think they would have caught this typo. Asbestos is world-renowned in the automotive aftermarket as a leading manufacturer of brake parts
     
  10. Dec 6, 2019 at 3:49 AM
    #10
    Too Stroked

    Too Stroked Well-Known Member

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    The only part of your post that I want to comment specifically on is where you say "all of which I cleaned and lubed with anti-sieze before re-assembly." If you're referring to Never Seize or similar products, you really should not be using that for brakes. Toyota makes several products specifically for lubricating brake parts and they both come in white tubes. One product is used to lubricate the pads where they sit in the caliper brackets and the other is used for slider pins. (Tacomas do not have slider pins as they have fixed calipers.) Never Seize does not hold up in high heat (such as brake) applications.

    If you need the Toyota part numbers for these products, I can run out to the garage and get them for you. My son is a former Toyota dealer Service Technician and he gets this stuff from where he worked.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019
  11. Dec 6, 2019 at 6:47 AM
    #11
    photonashville

    photonashville Well-Known Member

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    Yes, add the shims with Toyota pads.

    If you want to listen to squeaky reverse morning brakes for years, then by all means don't use shims. Ask me how I know. I've done it both ways and one way is just plain wrong.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019
  12. Dec 6, 2019 at 6:53 AM
    #12
    TenBeers

    TenBeers Well-Known Member

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    What I found with my 2nd gen is that Toyota has 2 different part numbers for pads. The more expensive ones are supposedly better. But I always go with OEM pads.

    New hardware is not always necessary, but it is cheap insurance. I always do the new hardware and use the ceramic grease, you don't need to go crazy with it.
     
  13. Dec 6, 2019 at 8:23 AM
    #13
    IL Capo

    IL Capo Well-Known Member

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    I agree...went to the dealer here and said I could just reuse the shims if I was sticking with OEM pads....if you do switch to aftermarket don't throw out the shims they are worth $40.00 and a good idea to keep.
     

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