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Are there better times to use the RR locker than others?

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas (1995-2004)' started by SurefireDBL, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. Jun 17, 2013 at 10:08 PM
    #1
    SurefireDBL

    SurefireDBL [OP] Active Member

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    So, I replaced the actuator and I did the grey wire mod. Now then,
    I was playing around in the back yard (grass) and testing it out with open diff and started to spin. I then thought to myself, " perfect time" for the RR locker to be engaged. I did and the truck just started to spin (both tires) and moved/shifted sideways. WTF!
    Backyard has a short, slight grade to it. Wasn't wet, just grass.
    Question is, are there better times to use the RR locker than others?
    I hope this makes sense.
    Signed,
    Disappointed
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  2. Jun 17, 2013 at 10:43 PM
    #2
    ffirg

    ffirg Well-Known Member

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    Yes. I don't use it on ice or any other slippery surface that may cause the back end to slide out from under itself. I mean I've used it on ice but it was in a fairly flat area. I've also decided against it while going up an icy road with a cliff to my left. But that's about the only condition I don't use it. I suppose a muddy trail that leans one way wouldn't be the best if the back end broke free as well though.
     
  3. Jun 17, 2013 at 10:49 PM
    #3
    tomtom

    tomtom Well-Known Member

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    Climbing straight up or down a grade = good time

    Driving along the grade = bad time

    Ice or other slippery surfaces = bad time.

    Snow, gravel, dirt, rock face = good time

    Generic situations and rules so take it for what it is worth. First hand experience is hard to beat.

    Mud, I have no clue about. I stay away from it.

    Not sure why you are disappointed. The rear locker is not a magic traction button. It is a tool to be used in the appropriate situation.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  4. Jun 17, 2013 at 11:07 PM
    #4
    Justus

    Justus fucks not given

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    Engage it BEFORE u get stuck for extra insurance.

    Its def not gunna pull ya out of stuck as well as those 2 front tires.
     
  5. Jun 18, 2013 at 7:22 AM
    #5
    SurefireDBL

    SurefireDBL [OP] Active Member

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    Thanks to everyone. So it definitely has its limits. I just thought on a little grassy grade going straight up? Oh well, like tomtom said, first hand experience is hard to beat. I will slowly learn. Definitely glad it is working as opposed to not.
    More comments are appreciated.
     
  6. Jun 18, 2013 at 7:26 AM
    #6
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

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    The locker is good for times when you'll be flexing the suspension and floating a tire. Open differentials put power to the tire with the least resistence (the one most likely to spin and get you no where). A locker forces power to both tires and should help you through the obstacle.
     
  7. Jun 18, 2013 at 7:33 AM
    #7
    LoadedTaco

    LoadedTaco Kick A$$ Member

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    The locker is an incredible resource to have at your fingertips when the situation calls for it. I can tell you out in Moab it came in handy a few times. Like everyone else said it is all about the right time to use it.

    Check out this video of an idiot with open differentials. You can see how only the front right tire spins while the other 3 lay useless. A locker in that situation would cause him to get out.
    http://youtu.be/egYkhl7Xv5A

    Here is another example:
    Look at how the big green truck(@6:25). He has 2 spinning drivers side tires while the other two that have good traction do nothing.

    You will have to go to youtube to see this one and jump to 6:25 to see what I am talking about.

    http://youtu.be/mTXXJ8dbnR0?t=6m24s
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  8. Jun 18, 2013 at 7:34 AM
    #8
    Madjik_Man

    Madjik_Man The Rembrandt of Rattle Can

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    what are your tires like?
     
  9. Jun 18, 2013 at 7:38 AM
    #9
    Madjik_Man

    Madjik_Man The Rembrandt of Rattle Can

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    Wow, that first dude was just mangling his undercarriage
     
  10. Jun 18, 2013 at 7:46 AM
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    LoadedTaco

    LoadedTaco Kick A$$ Member

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    I know right, did you have your volume on? You can hear his drive shaft spinning! :eek:
     
  11. Jun 18, 2013 at 8:48 AM
    #11
    PolishAndWax.com

    PolishAndWax.com Well-Known Member Vendor

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    Well said.

    In addition to some of the other comments mentioned, locking the rear diff can also make sharp turns very difficult. It can clobber your turning radius. I was taking a hairpin turn on dirt uphill one time with the rear locked and couldn't cut it sharp enough. Once you're in that situation, you can't unlock because there's too much tension built up. So I had to back up to make the turn. Not a big deal but it's a little scary if you're not expecting it, especially if there's a big rock or cliff on the outside of the turn.

    Also not mentioned is that locking the rear diff is great for doing doughnuts. :D
     
  12. Jun 18, 2013 at 10:29 AM
    #12
    xcmtb83

    xcmtb83 Well-Known Member

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    I like to use mine with cruise control on speeding down snow and ice covered highways with deep ditches and or cliffs to the side...SARCASM!
     
  13. Jun 18, 2013 at 11:34 AM
    #13
    SurefireDBL

    SurefireDBL [OP] Active Member

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    Good point, Madjik. I don't even have all terrains. Fusion SUV' s. They were on it when I bought it. They have great tread still yet. But they are just descent I suppose.
     
  14. Jun 18, 2013 at 11:48 AM
    #14
    Southern01Taco

    Southern01Taco Well-Known Member

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    Everytime I plan to actually wheel mine, I lock the rear end. 2wd/4wd, it doesn't matter. I have never had it turned on and said "if only the rear end wouldn't have been locked".

    You can't do this without the locker.

    [​IMG]

    Or probably even this.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Jun 19, 2013 at 12:08 AM
    #15
    x2468

    x2468 Well-Known Member

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    rear diff lock isn't a replacement for 4x4. It isn't a very dramatic step up from open rear. But rear diff lock and 4x4 multiply each others effectiveness, unless you're in some of the aforementioned scenarios. Momentum, line choice, tires, and other driving decisions still apply.
     
  16. Jun 19, 2013 at 12:11 AM
    #16
    x2468

    x2468 Well-Known Member

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    Highway tires are terrible in grass. They're like the complete opposite of what the tires are designed for. A little grass can really embarrass a two wheel drive truck sometimes, especially if it's wet (which I know you said it wasn't) lol
     
  17. Jun 19, 2013 at 12:12 AM
    #17
    x2468

    x2468 Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a video of that 2nd event?
     
  18. Jun 19, 2013 at 12:38 AM
    #18
    AK Taco

    AK Taco Your opinion? Fuck it.

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    So just to clarify, with open/open diffs does power go to the tire with the least resistance on each axle? Or just the one tire with least resistance?
     
  19. Jun 19, 2013 at 12:52 AM
    #19
    MGMTacolover55

    MGMTacolover55 Well-Known Member

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    If you see a hot chick then you lock the rear diff and slide over to pick her up
     
  20. Jun 19, 2013 at 1:16 AM
    #20
    ffirg

    ffirg Well-Known Member

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    With an open diff, the power will transfer to the tire with least resistance. So in the pictures above, the tire in the air would normally be free spinning, while the tire on the other side of the axle would have no power at all. So essentially our 4x4 trucks are really only 2wd in certain situations. But with a locked rear you will always have at least 3 tires with power.
     
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