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Aux wiring help

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by austinrauh, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. Nov 13, 2017 at 3:39 PM
    #1
    austinrauh

    austinrauh [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  2. Nov 13, 2017 at 3:39 PM
    #2
    Unchained 5150

    Unchained 5150 Rick

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  3. Nov 13, 2017 at 3:50 PM
    #3
    GHOST SHIP

    GHOST SHIP hates you.

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    Couple things:
    First, that main power lead looks pretty thin to me. Second the spots where you have electrical tape holding it together for what I assume are splices leads me to question the integrity of the splice. The two of those together just screams fire waiting to happen. Not talking shit, just trying to prevent something bad from happening to your truck.

    To have your box be ACC-ON, you'd have to power it using a similar fuse on the truck (ACC-ON). I've never done it with one of those type boxes (I'm assuming switchpros or switchpros knock off?). The easiest way is to have the lead that powers the switches come from your ACC-ON fuse in the truck. That way even thought the box is still powered all the time, the switches are not being powered so they will not let anything turn on until the key is turned on. Since your box uses a ribbon cable, it might be a little more complicated. I've seen some guys tap into the ACC-ON fuse to power a high-amp relay that in turn powers the box (via your main power lead), but That's about as much knowledge I have for doing it that way.

    I can't be more help, but at least that should point you in the right direction.
     
    kgarrett11 likes this.
  4. Nov 13, 2017 at 3:57 PM
    #4
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    I see fire hazzards all over the place.

    Get a proper main power wire, with proper connectors on the ends.

    As far as a switched block, you should do relays with a switched hot (ACDC relay is good for that) to power the relay coil, and your switch in your dash should be a switch ground to power your goodies on your block.
     
  5. Nov 13, 2017 at 4:10 PM
    #5
    austinrauh

    austinrauh [OP] Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the tips, if you're talking about the electrical tape thats red, the wires are sauder'ed then heat shrink wrap over the sauder then the tape, on all the connections, minus the ones to the main power relay have it like that, which is just smoothed because i ran out of the eye connectors, that will be fixed shortly. Is there still a problem I should look at?
    Also you suggest larger Main wire, will do, then I would just need proper connectors to the box.

    then as far as it turning on and off with ignition is going to be difficult..
     
  6. Nov 13, 2017 at 4:12 PM
    #6
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    So what lighting box is this? There should be a main power high amp line thats always hot from the battery for your main power load, then a switch on ignition power low amp line for all the relay coils. This is how every relay in the tacoma works.
     
  7. Nov 13, 2017 at 4:12 PM
    #7
    austinrauh

    austinrauh [OP] Well-Known Member

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  8. Nov 13, 2017 at 4:13 PM
    #8
    austinrauh

    austinrauh [OP] Well-Known Member

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    the lights them selves aren't always on, its just the back light of the switch panel stays on when I turn off the truck

    also is that main power point sketchy to use?
     
  9. Nov 14, 2017 at 4:00 PM
    #9
    Larzzzz

    Larzzzz Grande' Ricardo

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    Aux back up lights, Bed lights, Re-located trailer plug, Good dooby, a.k.a. jumper cable mod, Heated seats, back up camera,
    Looks nice. However, you have a couple issues that need to be addressed. I'm not trying to be an ass, just want you to have a safe installation.:thumbsup:
    You're feeding a 150 amp breaker from a 100 amp fuse. The 100 and fuse, and assuming a voltage of 13.5 volts, could supply 1350 watts of power. That 150 amp breaker, over 2000 watts. Are you using anywhere near that?

    That circuit breaker feeding the control should be close to where you're getting the supply, which I'm assuming will be the battery when all is said and done.

    Is that controller itself rated for 150 amps?

    How many watts total, everything you have connected to it,
    Measure the voltage at the battery with the truck running and use that to divide the watts. That will tell you how much current you need for all the lights. Round your answer up to the next size fuse.

    You may only need a Bosch relay to switch the controller power, rather than something like a starter solenoid.
    In any event, do NOT use a fuse higher than the controllers rating. If that ends up being the case, no worries, it's an easy fix.
     
  10. Nov 14, 2017 at 4:19 PM
    #10
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    Yup what he said. That breaker looks WAY overkill for your application. And like stated you should go directly from the battery with a fuse as close as you can to the battery.

    More than likely you could get away with a single relay to provided switched power to the controller but that depends on how much you are drawing as a whole with everything.

    get us some figures and we are here to help!
     
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  11. Nov 15, 2017 at 11:36 AM
    #11
    Larzzzz

    Larzzzz Grande' Ricardo

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    Aux back up lights, Bed lights, Re-located trailer plug, Good dooby, a.k.a. jumper cable mod, Heated seats, back up camera,
    @austinrauh I was looking at that unit in your link and see no spec for current rating. I'd be tempted to use that unit to turn on Bosch relays instead of carrying the load of the lights. It doesn't look serviceable to me. Those relay contracts in the controller will last a lot longer too.
    I saw exactly what would work perfectly in another thread a while back. Relays and fuses for each in one package with terminals to energize the coils for each relay. Separating each of the loads makes troubleshooting easier too.

    Let me see if I can find that thing...

    Found it...
    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/diy-build-and-install-a-bussmann-rtmr-fuse-relay-block.399454/
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  12. Nov 15, 2017 at 4:44 PM
    #12
    JdevTac

    JdevTac Bawnjourno

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    So what is the purpose of this box? Just to toggle power out to accessory relays?

    Cause like what was posted above, there is no amp ratings or anything. Doesn’t looks like this was meant to ever handle a load at all, hence the small gauge wire.

    If I was OP I’d return this to Amazon and get something else. Even a blue Sea panel would be great and relatively inexpensive. And not a fire hazard.

    Edit: and adding to that, id rather tie in the positive lead directly off the battery. There’s no need to tie into the fuse box bolt. And aside from the issues with the breaker as pointed out in posts above, get some proper ring terminals crimped onto those twisted up wires, that’s a mess.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  13. Nov 15, 2017 at 11:00 PM
    #13
    road2cycle

    road2cycle Well-Known Member

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    If you can find adhesive lined heat shrink tubing that will be your best bet to waterproof the solder splices.

    As others mentioned running a fuse directly to the battery is better than piggybacking off the 100 amp fuse. Depending on what side of the 100 amp fuse you’re tapping into it either puts additional electrical stress on the 100 amp fuse (if you’re tapping int the load side of the fuse) or on the factory wiring (if you’re tapping into the battery side of the 100 amp fuse).

    Make sure whatever wiring you select that it has a higher current rating than the fuse protecting the wire (so the fuse opens before the wire overheats/melts/catches on fire).

    If the mounting plate is metal I’d add rubber grommets between those six wires where they pass through the mounting plate. Over time the road vibrations will likely cut through the wire insulation resulting in a short (if the mounting plate is metal).

    I’m not trying to be critical of your install . . . just want to reduce the possibility of something going wrong with the wiring.
     

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