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Bed Weighting for Winter Traction

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by taconinja, Aug 12, 2008.

  1. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:02 AM
    #1
    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    How much and what kind of weight does everyone use to get extra traction in the snow? I am considering pouring custom concrete sections to keep my bed usable in the winter. I saw this in a co-workers 1st gen. Taco at the ski resort I work at. I was thinking of making 6 75# concrete sections. I would add rope handles and coat them in bedliner to make them easily removable, grippy, and stealthy. Thoughts?
     
  2. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:04 AM
    #2
    jhodge83

    jhodge83 Any dog under 50# is a cat and cats are useless... Moderator

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    wat?
    some do bag sand or cement blocks....but i think the easiest way would be to get one of the water bladders that ties down and freezes to hold it even more

    but ur thought does sounds pretty good and mobile as well
     
  3. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:21 AM
    #3
    gpspowell

    gpspowell Well-Known Member

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    My experience from a lifetime living in Colorado is that weight in the bed isn't as important as balance between front and rear. Adding weight to the bed, if it creates a truck that is rear heavy will give you good start-up traction but make the truck prone to spinning out on curves or when evasive maneuvers are needed. What ever you use, pay attention to front/rear equalization.
     
  4. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:23 AM
    #4
    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    200#? 400#? 600#? I know the composite bed makes the 2nd Gen pretty light in the ass end... I love driving in the snow but this will be my first winter doing it in a truck :D Gotta get first chair on those pow days quickly and safely!
     
  5. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:24 AM
    #5
    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    we're getting an early start here.

    You could just get a few bags of concrete and wet them down in the paper bag. They'll solidify like that.
     
  6. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:25 AM
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    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Very good point, is 50/50 optimal? Or do I need to go to the guy with the corner-weighting scales we use for our Solo 2 Miata? :rolleyes:
     
  7. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:36 AM
    #7
    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    This is a rough sketch of my idea. I want something that keeps my bed tidy and does not shift around. I saw it done without the bedliner but I think the latter step will give it a nice finishing touch.
     
  8. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:38 AM
    #8
    wiscdave

    wiscdave Lets Do It!

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    more weight = less mpg

    I just recommend to Drive more cautious
     
  9. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:39 AM
    #9
    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    that's a good idea. Are you planning on lining your bed with visquine and a few pieces of plywood and just pouring the concrete directly in there?
     
  10. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:42 AM
    #10
    Demoncleaner

    Demoncleaner Well-Known Member

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    Agree w/ jpspowell, shoot for 50/50. Dcabs are 55/45 on weight distribution, my bed mat is about 100 lb, so I only add 1 or 2 sandbags, depending on how many peeps, skiis, & boards coming along.

    Seeing your a reg cab w/ 4wd , would think 200 lbs an addition to the gear in the back is fine. Sand bags are easy, but hey custom concrete forms would work too. If your running got stock Dunlops take it easy, you'll probably realize you'll want better A/T tire after one storm...
     
  11. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:47 AM
    #11
    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    My concept:
    1. Cover the bottom and sides of the bed with a thick plastic drop cloth.
    2. Partition the bed into 6 rectangles with luan or thin plywood.
    3. Distribute 200-400lb of concrete equally in sections.
    4. Suspend 6 rope lift handles with knotted and washered ends into drying concrete.
    5. Coat tops of concrete sections with roll -on rubberized, textured bedliner.
    I will also be replacing the AT20s with studded snows on my OE wheels.
     
  12. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:49 AM
    #12
    jhodge83

    jhodge83 Any dog under 50# is a cat and cats are useless... Moderator

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    wat?
    u might wanna do the bottoms as well to save scratches in the stock bed
     
  13. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:50 AM
    #13
    Simon's Mom

    Simon's Mom Wag More Bark Less

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    Wow that's a pretty cool idea. I've done the tube sandbags & a couple of 2x6s with eyehooks to keep em from sliding. I find the sand is handy to have on hand on occasion. My tonneau keeps the snow/rain/ice out & the bags dry.
     
  14. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:50 AM
    #14
    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Good idea, I will do that!
     
  15. Aug 12, 2008 at 8:51 AM
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    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    How about putting some pieces of pvc while your pouring the concrete. That way you could replace the rope handles when they rot.
     
  16. Aug 12, 2008 at 9:00 AM
    #16
    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I like that idea, too! Thanks for all the input. 200# makes for very thin pieces of concrete though. Maybe just make the U-shaped sections over the axle and between the wheel wells?
     
  17. Aug 12, 2008 at 9:03 AM
    #17
    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    2" is also pretty thin, I'd be tempted to do some wire mesh.
     
  18. Aug 12, 2008 at 9:08 AM
    #18
    taconinja

    taconinja [OP] Well-Known Member

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    The slabs I bought to park my Ninja on were 24 X 24 X 2 and felt pretty sturdy. This was also roughly the thickness of the ones I saw in the 1st Gen Taco. I figure they will not be subjected to a lot of bending but rather pressure. Hopefully a rubberized coating will protect them from impacts.
     
  19. Aug 12, 2008 at 9:11 AM
    #19
    camsbored

    camsbored Well-Known Member

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    Just a thought... but adding *any* weight in front of the rear wheels seems counter-productive to me. If the goal is 50/50 weight distribution then you'll add the least weight to obtain that goal by putting the weight as far back as possible. Weight added in front of the rear wheels also adds weight (although proportionally less) to the front too. Adding behind the rear wheels does the opposite. Without stressing my brain too much on any "real" math I would guess that you could add about 1/4 less weight if it was all behind the wheel arches. As was said before, less weight = better mpg.
     
  20. Aug 12, 2008 at 9:16 AM
    #20
    lsocoee

    lsocoee My hair is all natural Moderator

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    I'm just thinking that having holes in it for the handles is going to put some bending stress on there when you carry them. Wire mesh is cheap, easy and will hold the blocks together if they do crack.

    In theory, I agree with you. I think that one of the users here ran into some issues of excessive bounce by installing the weight behind the wheels.
     
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