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Cars hacked through wireless tire sensors!!!!

Discussion in 'General Automotive' started by originalthoughts, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. Aug 12, 2010 at 11:28 AM
    #1
    originalthoughts

    originalthoughts [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Tailgate Anti-Theft, SnugTop Xtra Vision Shell, WeatherTech Mats, Extra D-Rings, Bed Mat, K&N drop-in
    Although I would like to have some of these tools to deal with some tailgaters it is still a scary thought.


    The tire pressure monitors built into modern cars have been shown to be insecure by researchers from Rutgers University and the University of South Carolina. The wireless sensors, compulsory in new automobiles in the US since 2008, can be used to track vehicles or feed bad data to the electronic control units (ECU), causing them to malfunction.

    Earlier in the year, researchers from the University of Washington and University of California San Diego showed that the ECUs could be hacked, giving attackers the ability to be both annoying, by enabling wipers or honking the horn, and dangerous, by disabling the brakes or jamming the accelerator.

    The new research shows that other systems in the vehicle are similarly insecure. The tire pressure monitors are notable because they're wireless, allowing attacks to be made from adjacent vehicles. The researchers used equipment costing $1,500, including radio sensors and special software, to eavesdrop on, and interfere with, two different tire pressure monitoring systems.

    The pressure sensors contain unique IDs, so merely eavesdropping enabled the researchers to identify and track vehicles remotely. Beyond this, they could alter and forge the readings to cause warning lights on the dashboard to turn on, or even crash the ECU completely.

    Unlike the work earlier this year, these attacks are more of a nuisance than any real danger; the tire sensors only send a message every 60-90 seconds, giving attackers little opportunity to compromise systems or cause any real damage. Nonetheless, both pieces of research demonstrate that these in-car computers have been designed with ineffective security measures.

    The Rutgers and South Carolina research will be presented at the USENIX Security conference later this week.

    http://arstechnica.com/security/new...tm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss


    And here's another article:
    http://jalopnik.com/5610373/hackers-wirelessly-crash-cars-computer-at-highway-speeds
     
  2. Aug 12, 2010 at 11:31 AM
    #2
    98tacoma27

    98tacoma27 is gooder 'en chicken Moderator

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  3. Aug 13, 2010 at 6:08 AM
    #3
    originalthoughts

    originalthoughts [OP] Well-Known Member

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    2010 DC TRD OR 4x4
    Tailgate Anti-Theft, SnugTop Xtra Vision Shell, WeatherTech Mats, Extra D-Rings, Bed Mat, K&N drop-in
    My searching skills must suck a$$. :pout:
     
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