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Cleaning the Rear Drum Brake Assembly...

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by NeverB4, Oct 29, 2019.

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Have you replaced your rear brake shoes?

  1. Yes

    6.5%
  2. No

    77.4%
  3. I plan to

    16.1%
  1. Oct 29, 2019 at 8:39 AM
    #1
    NeverB4

    NeverB4 [OP] New Member

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    Here's another one of my DIY videos. This particular truck didn't need new brake shoes, so I cleaned it well and put it back together.

    https://youtu.be/Gzcd-jn4N5c

    Hit LIKE and SUBSCRIBE to my channel!
     
    BillsSR5 and NAAC3TACO like this.
  2. Oct 29, 2019 at 8:51 AM
    #2
    nd4spdbh

    nd4spdbh Well-Known Member

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    Much easier to thread in i wanna say an m8 bolt into the threaded holes to push the drum off in about 5 secs.
     
  3. Oct 29, 2019 at 9:18 AM
    #3
    NeverB4

    NeverB4 [OP] New Member

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    I've seen that done, but didn't even think about it this round because I've never done it myself. Thanks for the knowledge share, I'll definitely have to do that when the shoes need replacing!
     
  4. Oct 29, 2019 at 10:28 AM
    #4
    TacoFergie

    TacoFergie Well-Known Member

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    I have used a bolt countless times on all Toyotas. A little advice if you do it that way though....
    -hit the drum on the hub area with a hammer a few times to knock everything loose
    -optional - rotate the drum so the bolt holes are horizontal, you'll see why in a few steps
    -thread in the bolts
    -use a 3/8" impact gently on said bolts
    -as it starts to separate you can tap with a hammer around the hub again if needed (dont get too carried away)
    -if it gets about 3/4"-1" off the hub and it's not fully separated then the shoes are caught on a rust lip of the drum
    -in that case you have 2 options...
    -remove the bolts, push the drum back on and loosen the adjuster
    -tap around the outside of the drum to hopefully knock them loose or rock the drum back and forth against the bolts.
    -once removed, spray the piss out of the area with brake clean!
    -using a steel wire brush clean the contact areas and spray clean
    -remove the adjuster, separate it, clean it really good and put a small amount of lube on it.
    -lube contact points
    -optional - scuff the shoes with some sand paper, basically just removing the shiny stuff
    -reassemble and adjust till its barely dragging
    -go to a parking lot, go into reverse at about 10mph, hit the brakes fairly hard, repeat a couple times. You'll feel the difference in the brake pedal. To keep the adjuster working nicely it is recommended to do this step every once in awhile. That is often why your brake pedal will feel like it has added travel if it is not properly adjusted. Also why grandmas Camry or Corolla brake pedal may feel squishy or have a lot of travel.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2019
    Marc70, NeverB4 [OP] and BillsSR5 like this.
  5. Oct 29, 2019 at 11:01 AM
    #5
    lynlan1819

    lynlan1819 Well-Known Member

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    Forget the video and do this way ^
     
  6. Oct 29, 2019 at 11:13 AM
    #6
    BillsSR5

    BillsSR5 Well-Known Member

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    wheres the brake cleaner spray HOLMES? also emory cloth/sandpaper to scruff the drums of glaze and then blast with brake cleaner
     
  7. Oct 29, 2019 at 11:15 AM
    #7
    BillsSR5

    BillsSR5 Well-Known Member

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    copied and saved, thanx
     
    TacoFergie likes this.
  8. Oct 29, 2019 at 1:07 PM
    #8
    TacoFergie

    TacoFergie Well-Known Member

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    ALL OF THE BRAKE CLEANER! haha

    Now that I don't work on cars anymore besides my own and friends/families i just buy brake cleaner by the case. A case of 12 they usually knock off about $1 a can on the prices. Also about the best brake lube you can use is the purple stuff made by permatex.

    https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-24125-Ceramic-Extreme-Lubricant/dp/B0018PSASU/ref=asc_df_B0018PSASU/?hvadid=312141533517&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14013520064929247590&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9018249&hvtargid=aud-801381245258%3Apla-571820984777&psc=1&ref=&adgrpid=61941536837
     
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  9. Oct 29, 2019 at 1:17 PM
    #9
    TheDevilYouLove

    TheDevilYouLove You can’t polish a turd, but you can polish a TRD

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    I’d like to a see a video on adjusting the rear brakes, and possibly lubricating the self adjusting mechanism as mentioned above.
     
    Rob MacRuger and NeverB4 [OP] like this.
  10. Oct 29, 2019 at 1:29 PM
    #10
    Rob MacRuger

    Rob MacRuger Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget to lube the total of six points on the two brake shoes. Brake cleaner will wash the lube away.
    Do the sandpaper on the shoes and drums, clean with spray (wear a respirator please), then lube the brake shoe contact points every 5K miles and you may never have to pry those drums off again.
     
  11. Oct 29, 2019 at 1:29 PM
    #11
    TacoFergie

    TacoFergie Well-Known Member

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    If it wasn't cold already or I had a garage big enough to fit my DCLB I would do it. Most drum brakes operate the same, so if you find a video on "self adjusting drum brakes" you should be good.

    The adjuster is pretty easy once you see it. It just unscrews and you clean it up really well with brake cleaner and brush, I prefer brass brushes because a stainless steel brush really isn't needed for this kind of stuff. After that just put a small amount of lube on the threads and ends where it contacts the shoes, screw back together again, install and bobs your auntie!

    I usually save that step for once I cleaned everything initially so I don't get too dirty. You also don't have to remove the shoes to do any of this. Just a couple flat screw drivers is all you need.

    HINT...DO ONE SIDE AT A TIME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! If for some reason a spring pops out and everything falls apart, take a breath, grab a beer and you will have the other side for reference!
     
    Blais03, spitdog, BillsSR5 and 4 others like this.
  12. Oct 30, 2019 at 7:19 AM
    #12
    BillsSR5

    BillsSR5 Well-Known Member

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    I use 2 cans of brake cleaner to clean the rears, I also used the Permatex ceramic lube on my front caliper pins, seems to have the highest temp rating among all those type lubes.
     
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  13. Oct 30, 2019 at 7:24 AM
    #13
    BillsSR5

    BillsSR5 Well-Known Member

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    that happened to me a spring retainer pin popped out and the springs went flying all over, talk about taking a deep breath, luckily the local Advance auto stocks up on the rear brake shoe spring replacement kits cause I ended up loosing few in the lawn which I found later on, but yeah next time im going to take removing the drums a little slower don't need that again.
     
  14. Oct 30, 2019 at 7:44 AM
    #14
    TacoFergie

    TacoFergie Well-Known Member

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    If it warms up before before winter really sets in I will try and do a photo how-to write up. I need to do it anyways, it's been a while.....
     
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  15. Oct 30, 2019 at 11:42 AM
    #15
    BillsSR5

    BillsSR5 Well-Known Member

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    you think it would be a good idea to use that PERMATEX ceramic lube on those rear drum contact points? I think last time I cleaned the rears I just used a few dabs of the #2 grease in my greasegun its all I had at that time I needed to get it buttoned up without another trip to Vatozone
     
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  16. Oct 30, 2019 at 1:09 PM
    #16
    TacoFergie

    TacoFergie Well-Known Member

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    Thats what I have always used. Seems to work good and doesn't wash off easily with water (like if you go through a water crossing)or anything, still holds onto break dust....but thats going to be any kind of lube you would use.
     
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  17. Nov 1, 2019 at 11:51 AM
    #17
    Rob MacRuger

    Rob MacRuger Well-Known Member

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    I read that synthetic grease works best for the backing plate. I have always used the stuff that came out of my grease gun that I used on everything else.
     
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  18. Nov 1, 2019 at 11:57 AM
    #18
    BillsSR5

    BillsSR5 Well-Known Member

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    I even started using my greasegun #2 grease on my hood latch hook pieces hangs in there better than lithium or WD30
     
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  19. Nov 1, 2019 at 5:58 PM
    #19
    Tacorific

    Tacorific Well-Known Member

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    My $0.02. Take it for what it's worth.
    I've lived in the rust belt almost all of my life, and I've been doing drum brakes for years, (yes, I'm that old). Brake drum sticking is a fact of life here. I don't understand your comment. Are you suggesting that lubing the shoe contact points will prevent the drums from sticking? Don't get me wrong, you should lube the shoe to backing plate contact points, but... Every time I have had trouble removing the drums, (and there have been many) it has either been the rust between the drum and the hub, or rust has built up on the lip on the drum just outside of where the shoes ride on the inside surface of the drum.
    I do two additional things during a brake cleaning/inspection:
    1. Wire brush the rust off of the hub face that mates with the drum, paying close attention to the hub lip that engages with the inner diameter of the drum. Spread a thin layer of copper anti-sneeze (I use Fel-Pro C5-A) on the hub face and lip. Wipe most of the anti-seize back off of the hub face, insuring that the oil in the anti-seize does not eventually migrate to the shoe/drum contact area. Also, wire brush the inside face and inner diameter of the drum where it make contact with the hub, but don't put anti-seize on those surfaces
    2. Grind 10 to 20 thousands of an inch (0.010" to 0.020") of the metal off of the brake contact surface of the drum just outside of where the shoes make contact, and paint that area (and only that area) with a rust converter (I use Loctite Extend). (The rust converter takes five to ten minutes to cure.)
    You should be able to get at least 20K miles between brake inspections, without sticking drums, using this method.
     
  20. Nov 2, 2019 at 4:07 AM
    #20
    george3

    george3 Well-Known Member

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    Make a YouTube video on all these moves !
     
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