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Cylinder 5 Misfire

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas (1995-2004)' started by freebird4446, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. Apr 23, 2019 at 7:07 AM
    #1
    freebird4446

    freebird4446 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Pete
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    Getting check engine code that says Cylinder 5 Misfire. I replaced the spark plug and ignition coil, then disconnected the battery for 10 minutes and reconnected it to clear the light. After 400 miles the light came back on.

    1) Did disconnecting the battery really clear everything or is it possible I'm seeing it pop up again because I need someone with a touchscreen tool to clear it? Would it have passed during those 300 miles before the light came on?

    2) I assume it won't pass an emissions test with this problem and therefore cannot pass inspection? Are there any other steps I can take besides just taking it to the shop?
     
  2. Apr 23, 2019 at 7:44 AM
    #2
    02hilux

    02hilux Go where the few dares to travel

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    Compression check
     
  3. Apr 23, 2019 at 9:23 AM
    #3
    Glamisman

    Glamisman Well-Known Member

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    have you rescanned for codes? You are assuming that it is the same code, a P0305?
    It will not pass smog with the CEL illuminated.
    Yes, you sucessfully erased everything. If there is a local O'Reilly or AutoZone they will scan it for free hoping to sell you a part or 2. Dont buy the parts suggested, just get the code(s).

    If it is a cyl 5 misfire again then do as suggested and get a compression test preformed on the motor. An even better idea would be a leak down test on cyl #5. This will tell you if it is something mechanical or not. If all of these tests pass, then she might need an injector, this is assuming that the wiring isnt damaged. Swaping an injector isnt that hard just a bit time consuming.
     
    freebird4446 [OP] likes this.
  4. Apr 23, 2019 at 10:24 AM
    #4
    freebird4446

    freebird4446 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Pete
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    Thanks for the advice! Yes I re-scanned the code at an O'Reilly store when the light came on. I was planning on finishing the truck inspection that morning (needed to just pass the emissions test) but the shop was too busy that day so I was surprised when the light came back on later that afternnon. I'll do a compression test, hoping it's just the injector. Yikes. Truck has 240k miles on it. Would really like to make it to 500k. Just put on a ton of new parts...rotors, calipers, plugs, plug wires, ignition coil, fluid, etc.
     
  5. Apr 23, 2019 at 11:23 PM
    #5
    Glamisman

    Glamisman Well-Known Member

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    it sounds like your daily driver... that is going to make what I suggest difficult. I have a few OBDII scanners and when I have to get a vehicle smogged I will clear the codes and complete the drive cycles and the moment the scanner says it is smog ready I drive it to the smog shop and park it overnight and I am the first one there in the AM. I usually do my smog driving after 10 PM when there arent many people on the road... going 45 mph on the freeway for 10 minutes will get you run off the freeway here in southern CA. Unless you are the most unlucky guy out there the CEL shouldn't pop while it is on the dyno... you didnt mention what year she is... if the smog is a non dyno smog, you should be golden. Now you have time to get her repaired and have the govt off you back and mind for another 2 years.
     
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  6. Apr 24, 2019 at 7:32 AM
    #6
    freebird4446

    freebird4446 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thank you! It's a 2003 V6 3.4L. Maybe I'll pick up a OBDII scanner and give that a try. Are they all basically the same? I see some online for ~$35. I also was wondering, are a leak test and a compression test different tests?

    https://www.amazon.com/ANCEL-AD310-...obdii+scanner&qid=1556116286&s=gateway&sr=8-3
     
  7. Apr 24, 2019 at 9:32 AM
    #7
    Glamisman

    Glamisman Well-Known Member

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    for a few dollars more $100 the blue driver scanner is very tough to beat. Other scanners have a high user frustration factor and are nothing more than toys in comparison.

    Yes, a compression test and a leak down test are different. Both are tests used to determine the basic mechanical sealing ability of a cylinder. IMHO, the compression test is a go - no go test. All spark plugs are removed the compression tester is screwed into the spark plug hole, the throttle is open fully and the motor is cranked over and a reading is shown on the gage. All cylinders are compared and if there is more than a 10% difference in any of the cylinders further inspection is warranted. The weak point of the compression test is that the faster you spin the motor over the higher the compression so if the battery is not 100% the farther into the test could show lower readings and a misdiagnosis. You can acheive almost the same thing just by listening to the motor when it cranks over... crank crank crank then it speeds up, then crank crank crank.

    The leak down test is where a special gage is screwed into the sparkplug hole and compressed air is put into that cylinder. The first gage, input air, is set at 100 psi and a reading is taken off the second gage, if the second gage shows 80 psi you have a 20% leakage. You take the oil filler cap off and listen to the sound there, you open the throttle and listen there, you listen at the exhaust pipe and figure which is loudest and that is where the leakage is, it could be all 3.
     
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