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DIY Headrest Fire Extinguisher/Accessory Mount

Discussion in 'Technical Chat' started by StillNoPickles, Dec 10, 2019.

  1. Dec 10, 2019 at 8:00 PM
    #1
    StillNoPickles

    StillNoPickles [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Disclaimer:
    Please note that I do not take any liability or responsibility for injury or damage caused by installing or utilizing this setup. This mount configuration is meant to be used without a passenger in the rear seating area directly behind it. Use proper judgement when seating passengers in the area, and remove the mount/accessories as necessary for safety.

    E752CAD5-8900-4FEE-B152-72385B6ED446.jpg

    After numerous inquiries and interest among members here I’ve decided to create a thread on how to make your own headrest fire extinguisher/accessory mount. This is meant to securely hold a 2.5lb fire extinguisher and other accessories below based on their compatibility. This mount is bulletproof tough and has been proven in a few high impact collisions amongst myself and friends in multiple vehicle types.

    04918B8B-05E8-415F-9625-2AE9A04EB078.jpg

    This setup is ideal in an access cab Tacoma or pickup where rear passengers are seldom a thing, but can be used in most any vehicle. This mounting location doesn’t interfere with side curtain airbag deployment. Do not seat a passenger in your rear seat behind this location if you plan to utilize this. The need came for quick access to a fire extinguisher, trauma kit, and other necessities in the backcountry. While it may not be ideal, it keeps everything within quick grasp in a single consolidated area of the vehicle. So let’s get started:

    Parts required:

    7D3E9755-6F78-4C93-81BC-F082D9E1986F.jpg


    -2 steel bolt-through shaft collars to fit over you headrest posts

    -1 pair of quickfist mounts

    https://www.amazon.com/Quick-Clamp-...ywords=quick+fist+clamp&qid=1576035683&sr=8-6

    -2 grade 8 steel carriage bolts (length and thread pitch will depend on the threading of you shaft collars

    -Aluminum spacers to take up extra space in the bolt shaft between the mount and collars. (Not necessary but makes the project look cleaner IMO)

    -Non-permanent thread locker

    -Electrical Tape

    -Small socket/torque wrench

    Assembly:

    I purposely left sizes out for the shaft collars and carriage bolt lengths, as your truck or vehicle may have different seat specifications or dimensions.

    1. Obtain your quick fist mounts in advance. This will make your carriage bolt measurement easier.

    2. Remove your headrest and take it physically into your local hardware store along with your quick fist mounts. I prefer Ace, but I’ll leave that up to you. Find 2 bolt-through shaft collars that fit barely over your headrest posts.

    3. Find 2 grade-8 carriage bolts that will thread into your shaft collars and be able to pass through the mounting hole of your quick fist mounts. The key is for the bolts to be just long enough to firmly hold the quick fists with pressure against the back of your seat and headrest, keeping the assembly snug. The bolts on my 3rd gen assembly happen to be about 3” long. Your length may vary depending on your application which is why it’s key to bring these items into the store and narrow it down.

    4. Wrap a single wrap of electrical tape around the headrest posts where the collar will be mounted to the posts. This will prevent metal-metal contact with the collar, carriage bolts, and posts. Place the collars over the tape sections.

    5. This portion may be a bit tedious. Push the carriage bolts through the quick fist mount holes, followed by aluminum spacer on the backside of the carriage bolt if you’ve decided to use them. Place a small amount of thread locker on the thread of the carriage bolt and thread them into the shaft collar bolt-through hole. Keep tightening until secured into the collar. Repeat this process for the other quick fist mount on the other head rest post.

    FD2079F4-A89C-4227-BA74-AB03715F740F.jpg

    6. Position the mounts appropriately against the seat back and headrest. Snug down to ~25 ft lbs. DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN.

    That’s it in a nutshell. Feel free to ask any questions. Also please remember to dismount and shake the contents in your extinguisher every now and then, and also monitor it’s pressure.

    C6ADE038-DA72-471E-A4C7-000D72F96A4D.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
  2. Dec 10, 2019 at 8:13 PM
    #2
    bonifacio

    bonifacio Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty sweet.
     
  3. Dec 10, 2019 at 8:14 PM
    #3
    BullMoose

    BullMoose BullMoose

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    Looks good
     
  4. Dec 10, 2019 at 8:51 PM
    #4
    shane100700

    shane100700 Bed, Bath & Beyond Crawler

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    Shaft collars... so simple, yet genius!

    Good thing it’s December, that’s your one great idea quota for the year.
     
  5. Dec 11, 2019 at 1:26 AM
    #5
    Tullie D

    Tullie D Well-Known Member

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    Outstanding ! Thank you ! :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
  6. Dec 11, 2019 at 2:02 AM
    #6
    CXYyuppie

    CXYyuppie Sarcasm Master

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    Stuff with some other black things
    This is great. It'll be easy to install/move should there be the need to ride someone in the rear seat. It's on my list now! Thanks.
    Edit: Any chance you can make a list of what you keep in your 1st Responder bag? Thanks
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
  7. Dec 11, 2019 at 2:09 AM
    #7
    Wyoming09

    Wyoming09 Well-Known Member

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    I like the idea !!

    Though my Truck has far to much equipment in the space to install anything like that.
     
  8. Dec 11, 2019 at 7:00 AM
    #8
    Ruminator

    Ruminator Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't do this for my #10 extinguisher, but the quick-fist/shaft collar idea is genius. I might use this for a passenger side back-of-the-seat paper-towel holder/waste basket thingy I've been thinking about.

    Don't put anything too heavy up there people. Remember your physics. Bodies in motion... and all that.
     
  9. Dec 11, 2019 at 7:34 AM
    #9
    StillNoPickles

    StillNoPickles [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Good Morning.
    The small molle bag that I use below the extinguisher is:

    https://www.amazon.com/Lightning-Pr...products+headrest+molle&qid=1576077456&sr=8-1

    It's a great small pack that's versatile. It has a Velcro back panel and be grabbed and torn away at a moment's notice, and simply reattached after use. I try to live by the K-I-S-S principle, and this pack makes it easy to tailor it to my needs. I firmly believe piecing together your own kit based on your needs rather than carrying a generic premade kit. The list of items I have in mine is specific to most cases I see given my activities and environment. In AZ, most of the stuff I've come across is heat-related injuries, impact/auto accidents, and broken/sprained ankles. I spend a lot of time in the backcountry hiking and hunting, which is where most of these incidents arise. This kit is meant to simply buy time for the victim, and is not substantial for full backcountry treatment. It allows me to provide care until the professionals can step in and stabilize or evacuate the victim, and has come in handy in multiple cases unfortunately.

    Sawyer sting and bite kit
    Regular gauze
    Surgical shears
    Tweezers
    Surgical tape
    Multiple adhesive bandages
    Moleskin
    Small roll of duct tape
    Israeli bandages
    Swathes and bandanas
    Ceralyte electrolyte pouches
    Tourniquet
    SAM splint
    Hy-fin sucking chest wound seal
    Mini sharpie
    Nasal pharyngeal airway
    Disposable non latex gloves
    Goggles with black out inserts for eye injuries
    CPR facemask
    Weatherproof mini notepad
    Epi-pen
    Gu packets and honey packets for diabetics
    Topical iodine
    Alcohol pads
    Small trash bag for haz waste

    I should note that the items in your kit are only helpful if you know how to use them. I'd supplement a kit with a wilderness first responder class (especially if offroading or spending time off the beaten path), CPR class, and basic first aid class. And always have at least 2 forms of reliable communication in case of an emergency. In my case I have a cell phone, dual band HAM, CB Radio, and Garmin inReach. Redundancy is key when it comes to comms. Hope i'm not missing anything.
     
  10. Dec 11, 2019 at 7:50 AM
    #10
    StillNoPickles

    StillNoPickles [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Yes definitely would only recommend with a small 2.5lb extinguisher. Anything else will be too heavy and protrude too far out into open areas of the vehicle, as well as come into contact with side curtain airbags in an accident. The accident in the original post was from a 45mph impact with a midsize SUV in my old 4Runner. It came out unscathed, though I replaced the hardware for good measure.
     
    JIMMEISTER, six5crèéd and Ruminator like this.
  11. Dec 11, 2019 at 7:51 AM
    #11
    Ruminator

    Ruminator Well-Known Member

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    Good points, all.

    Some years ago, I took the Basic First Aid course through Red Cross. I figured that there are times that, even when you CAN call for help, help might not be coming anytime soon. In rural areas, the nearest ambulance might be an hour away. Knowing some basic first aid wouldn't hurt.

    Turns out, the basic Red Cross class is mainly for people who's job requires the training for licensing (day-care operators, camp counselors, etc.). They essentially teach you how to call 9-1-1.

    I mentioned this to my boss, who was a former scout leader and took yearly canoeing trips to the Boundary Waters of Minnesota. He said that a wilderness medicine course was really what I should have taken.

    Just FWIW.
     
  12. Dec 11, 2019 at 8:14 AM
    #12
    StillNoPickles

    StillNoPickles [OP] Well-Known Member

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    This. There’s been times where it’s taken nearly 2 hours to get assistance, and that’s with helicopter evacuation. In this 2 hours you have to be able to know what to do and how to conduct yourself. This one was from an evac back in January from a dirt bike crash victim. She was wearing no protective gear and was in grave condition. That was nearly 2 hours of holding a young woman’s head together, treating broken limbs, and preventing shock. Not fun, but necessary.

    2C984E7A-BE68-4D59-AFCA-8FA33201E913.jpg
     
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  13. Dec 11, 2019 at 8:31 AM
    #13
    shane100700

    shane100700 Bed, Bath & Beyond Crawler

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    Sounds like you might be bad luck! :D:boink:
     
  14. Dec 11, 2019 at 8:34 AM
    #14
    StillNoPickles

    StillNoPickles [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Or good luck, depending on who’s perspective. ;)
     
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  15. Dec 11, 2019 at 8:50 AM
    #15
    shane100700

    shane100700 Bed, Bath & Beyond Crawler

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    I’m assuming you are or were a first responder? Those guys always have sage advice like knowing how to use the medical equipment they have.

    Strange concept for sure!
     
  16. Dec 11, 2019 at 8:56 AM
    #16
    StillNoPickles

    StillNoPickles [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Not currently but served as a medic on couple of trips to the desert and instructed combat lifesaving or CLS for awhile. Now mostly just instruct Airmen where I’m stationed now in a Self Aid Buddy Care and volunteer some of my off time with local SAR agencies.
    The reason I like the wilderness first responder course is that it forces you to improvise and think outside of the box, implementing what you have in an emergency situation. A little pricy for the class but well worth it in my opinion.
     
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  17. Dec 11, 2019 at 3:51 PM
    #17
    CXYyuppie

    CXYyuppie Sarcasm Master

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    Stuff with some other black things
    Ziplock bags. That is what we were instructed to use for barriers, gaping wounds, open chest cavity, etc. Easy to keep junk in and use for HazMat. I also have disposable mask and clear safety glasses. I’m a big believer in Universal Precaution.
    Thanks for providing your list.
     
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  18. Dec 12, 2019 at 8:43 AM
    #18
    StillNoPickles

    StillNoPickles [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Yup have 3 1 gallon bags in there for whatever I may need them for. I have some cool clear goggles that have blackout inserts if you need to use them on someone who has eye injury. I’m trying to put together a small laminated sheet or packet with General first-aid, trauma care also. That way anyone can utilize it regardless of experience level. Or if I happen to become a victim myself.
     
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  19. Feb 6, 2020 at 4:00 AM
    #19
    QMEDJoe

    QMEDJoe Proverbs 3:5-6

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    Awesome! Thanks for the write up. My ext. is tucked in the corner where that small seat folds up, it’s not secure and was going to drill into the interior paneling behind my drivers seat. Definitely doing this! :thumbsup:
     
    StillNoPickles [OP] likes this.
  20. Feb 6, 2020 at 8:49 AM
    #20
    Naveronski

    Naveronski Well-Known Member

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    Nice, I'm stealing this.

    How did you secure the velcro panel to the headrest posts?
     

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