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Electric chainsaw?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by TacoTuesday1, Jul 26, 2021.

  1. Jul 26, 2021 at 8:12 PM
    #1
    TacoTuesday1

    TacoTuesday1 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Thinking of getting an electric chainsaw.
    I hear a chainsaw is best to take when on trail to get through a fallen tree, because an axe will take forever.
    I see Milwaukee has an M18 for like only $200. Seems worth it to get unstuck.
    Electric because gas can go stale.
    Gas might have longer runtime and be refillable mobile, but maybe it's only one tree to cut that an electric could still handle.
    But, Milwaukee recommends a higher amp hour capacity battery. Which means you still have to spend extra to get the big ass battery that you probably don't already have.

    How do you store it?
    Saw a Taco build on TerraCrew where guy had exactly this, but probably gas, in a scabbard somewhere in the back for taking wheeling.
    I don't see any common offerings from the known Taco fab sites,
    but there seems to be a lot of generic stuff, by the name of scabbard, etc.
    Maybe one could be mounted upward somewhere in the bed to hide the chainsaw out of sight to prevent theft, and have gravity helping hold the chainsaw stay put in it.
    Not planning on doing this any time soon, but was curious to know if anyone else has

    I guess if it's gasoline you can always add some Sta-Bil and then just pour the gas back in the truck tank using a funnel after the trip to avoid it sitting.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Jul 26, 2021 at 8:36 PM
    #2
    Jimmyh

    Jimmyh Well-Known Member

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  3. Jul 26, 2021 at 8:51 PM
    #3
    Waasheem

    Waasheem The catholic radio bear

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    I imagine what you’re going to encounter would be a large tree. I also imagine you’ll eat through some batteries to accomplish getting the path cleared. So plan on carrying several extra fully charged batteries.

    I have the dewalt 20v platform. When using the sawzall for major tree trimming I’ll usually go through 3 batteries. Saw down big stuff, then use bypass pruners to cut off the smaller branches, back to the sawzall, back to the pruners. Usually after 2 or 3 swaps the battery will be spent. A cordless chain saw would probably eat through a battery a little quicker.
     
  4. Jul 26, 2021 at 9:36 PM
    #4
    TacoTuesday1

    TacoTuesday1 [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I mean I was hoping realistically it would just be:
    -one tree
    -one battery
    but if that's not realistic then maybe gas really is the better option despite it's drawbacks, and may even be cheaper

    fuel source for gas could be external fuel tank in bed (rotopax, etc.) or siphoning from tank, if even possible (not sure what kind of anti-siphon tech it has, if any)
     
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  5. Jul 26, 2021 at 9:44 PM
    #5
    4xdog

    4xdog Well-Known Member

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    I just got a Milwaukee M18 chainsaw. A storm brought down part of a tree and my old Solo saw got scrapped a few months ago as the company long since quit making saws and parts were near impossible.

    I’m truly impressed with the Milwaukee. Its narrow-kerf chain cuts like butter and the 12 A-h battery lasts and lasts. I’ve tired of cutting before I’ve come close to exhausting it. The saw is a bit heavy — that’s its only downside so far. I’ve been a yellow guy for most of my battery tools, but this chainsaw was enough to turn me red.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2021
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  6. Jul 26, 2021 at 9:45 PM
    #6
    Waasheem

    Waasheem The catholic radio bear

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    One battery is possible, I’m guessing, if you went with a higher voltage platform. Dewalt has I think 40&60 volt. I’m sure Milwaukee has something similar. Probably costly tho. Dewalt has I think 9&10 amp batteries which might get it done. I have 4&5 amp batteries.
     
  7. Jul 27, 2021 at 1:29 AM
    #7
    TACOMA2NDGEN

    TACOMA2NDGEN Well-Known Member

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    Lithium batteries have come a long way. We use makita brand at work and they do a decent job especially the hammer drill. Milwaukee is a great brand. And if you have a 110 outlet in the bed you can always have a battery charged
     
  8. Jul 27, 2021 at 5:56 AM
    #8
    blu92in99

    blu92in99 I hate everyone, equally

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    Ask me...
    Agreed on the bow saw. I keep a variation of one (Sven saw) in my truck at all times.

    That being said? I love my 18" Greenworks Pro 80V chainsaw.
     
  9. Jul 27, 2021 at 6:17 AM
    #9
    Haole Toy

    Haole Toy Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Dewalt 20v electric chainsaw about a month ago. I have been very impressed. It cuts six inch Junipers without a problem and the battery lasts for quite a while. It will be my back up saw when cutting firewood this season.
     
  10. Jul 27, 2021 at 6:32 AM
    #10
    TerraNerva

    TerraNerva Well-Known Member

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    This and That
    I bought a 56V Echo to keep in the truck, and have actually had to use it to clear a large tree blocking the trail. It had enough juice to limb it and make 3 crosscuts, with plenty left over to cut up some firewood for camp. I have been very impressed at how long battery lasts. Transporting it in just a scabbard is a pain tho, and the bar oil gets a lil messy, but its quiet, powerful and no fuel to pack and carry. They're worth having. I considered building a custom box for transport.
     
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  11. Jul 27, 2021 at 6:45 AM
    #11
    3JOH22A

    3JOH22A Cunning Linguist

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    I just keep mine in a storage crate strapped close to the tailgate with all the recovery gear. AFAIK electric chainsaws aren't water-resistant. I have a tonneau that keeps the rain out. The battery stays in the cab until needed.

    For brand, go with whatever platform you've already invested batteries in. I bought a 40V Sun Joe because I already had a 80V Snow Joe snowblower, and this saw uses one of the two 40V batteries I already had.

     
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  12. Jul 27, 2021 at 6:47 AM
    #12
    Teke

    Teke Soft-Roader :)

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    I have been using Milwaukee tools religiously the last 2 years and there is not another brand I would switch to. I have a lot of their Fuel series tools as well as the leaf blower and weed eater. I have been looking to pick up the 16" chainsaw as well. Their website claims their HD 12.0 battery will make 150 cuts on a 6x6 piece of cedar. Their batteries give full power to the very end, I am usually caught off guard when the battery dies because I never notice a lack of power.
     
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  13. Jul 27, 2021 at 8:28 AM
    #13
    tacomaboned

    tacomaboned Well-Known Member

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    I have the Ryobi 40V 16" version, its been great on the trail. I have quickly cleared numerous downed trees, up to about 28" in diameter without issue, and although I bring two batteries I've never actually needed the second one. When I tested originally, I was able to fully cut through a 24" diameter tree 10-12 times on a single battery.

    Milwaukee and the like probably make a higher quality chainsaw, but for my purposes (aka clearing downed trees off of trails, not being a lumberjack or arborist) it has been perfect.
     
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  14. Jul 27, 2021 at 8:57 AM
    #14
    CowboyTaco

    CowboyTaco $20 is $20

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    I started quoting messages to reply to each one individually, then I realized I could just reply to all.

    I went on a 3-4 day "overlanding" trip through Arkansas a few years back and one of the guys had the 56V EGO. There were 3 other chainsaws that were gas powered. Only one of the gas powered ones would run well enough to use. The guy with the EGO was made fun of on day 1 and loved rubbing in the fact that his chainsaw "just worked." He also commented on how nice it was that it wasn't super loud so he could start working in his yard early in the morning without disturbing his neighbors.

    He used it several times over the course of 3 days and still have about 50% battery (IIRC) at the end of the trip. I have no idea how many amp hours his battery was though.

    I agree with the stick with whatever platform you are already invested in. I have some 40V Ryobi stuff that has been relatively good, so I'd go with that just because I already have extra batteries and they are readily available at Home Depot.

    As for transporting it, just put it in a case and throw it in the bed when you need it. No sense in having a dedicated mount.
     
  15. Jul 27, 2021 at 9:31 AM
    #15
    SR-71A

    SR-71A Define "Well-Known Member"

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    I went back and forth on this issue before eventually going with a Silky Saw Katanaboy 500. Never have to worry about batteries or gas or oil. Never have to worry about any of the above leaking. Its still quite long when folded, but overall just a fraction of the size of a real chainsaw. And damn does it cut! Head to head with my buddies freshly charged Ryobi was dead even to make a full cut through a freshly fallen 6" poplar. Now obviously the human will fatigue quicker than a battery or gas. So if you have to do a lot of limbing or run into several trees youll be there longer than a chainsaw. But for as much as I use it its the easiest and lightest solution.
    http://www.silkysaws.com/Silky_Saws/Wood-Working-Saws/KATANABOY-with-500-extra-large-teeth

    Cons of gas:
    -Leaks gas
    -Pump gas goes bad quickly now and tends to cause issues in small engines. So need to buy the $$$ premix ethanol free stuff and make sure its still fresh before going out
    -Leaks oil
    -Space requirements

    Cons of electric:
    -Cost
    -Smaller batteries you already have for other tools probably wont cut it. A high capacity battery will give the best performance, but $$$
    -Leaks oil
    -Space requirements

    Cons of the Silky:
    -No sweet overland points

    Bow saws are generally useless as far as Im concerned. Hard to maneuver around if you need to limb or cut in a tight spot. And whatever you need to cut will be just that little bit bigger than your bow saw, 100% guaranteed
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2021
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  16. Jul 27, 2021 at 9:47 AM
    #16
    4wdExplorer

    4wdExplorer Well-Known Member

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    I have one of the Silky Saws, its good for small branches but I hardly used mine when camping. Too much work and a PITA (for me).

    I have a Milwaukee Electric Chain saw and I LOVE it. Total game changer. When I go camping there is alot of downed trees that you need a real saw to cut 4-10 inch logs for a good long lasting campfire.

    Leaking oil? Nope it does not.
     
  17. Jul 27, 2021 at 9:47 AM
    #17
    idriveabox

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    73D07EB1-C805-49A4-88BC-307B14F5E53B.jpg I prefer gas.
     
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  18. Jul 27, 2021 at 9:58 AM
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    SR-71A

    SR-71A Define "Well-Known Member"

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    Mobtown sliders, ARB bar, Icon RXT leafs, extended & adjustable Kings, JBA UCAs, Tepui Ayer 2, dual batteries, Gen2 xrc9.5 winch, CB, GMRS, S1 ditch lights...
    That checks out for that part of the world :D
     
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  19. Jul 27, 2021 at 9:59 AM
    #19
    Larry Dangerfield

    Larry Dangerfield When in doubt, throttle out

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    I have the Milwaukee saw and can 100% recommended it. I have filled up a truck bed on a Nissan frontier a couple times as well as truck bed and trailer with 1 12.0 battery and also filled my dad's six and a half foot tundra bed on 1 12.0 battery ( cutting a mixture of some 4 -5 foot lengths and some to firewood length ) All hardwood. Not needing gas and a saw that just runs instantly regardless of temperature is great
    IMG_20201228_134145.jpg IMG_20201230_084157.jpg
     
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  20. Jul 27, 2021 at 10:54 AM
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    CowboyTaco

    CowboyTaco $20 is $20

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    I think he is talking about bar oil. AFAIK, all chainsaws will leak bar oil if you don't drain it after use.
     

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