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Engine Break-in

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Okkine, Nov 26, 2008.

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Engine Break-In

  1. Hard Break-In: Get those RPM's up

    132 vote(s)
    11.4%
  2. Easy Break-In: Keep the RPM's low

    638 vote(s)
    55.2%
  3. Doesn't make a difference

    385 vote(s)
    33.3%
  1. Nov 26, 2008 at 7:53 PM
    #1
    Okkine

    Okkine [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I came across this article that talks about a hard break-in that is pretty much the opposite of the easy break-ins that most manuals recommend for the first 500-1000 miles. I'm curious of peoples thoughts on the break-in. Especially from those who have been rough on their brand new engines.

    http://mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

    more of his newsletters:
    http://mototuneusa.com/thanx.htm
     
  2. Nov 26, 2008 at 7:58 PM
    #2
    jrw1965

    jrw1965 Well-Known Member

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    I have had 2 new Tacomas and 3 new 4Runners (Not all at the same time of course) and I just drive them the way they will be driven while I have them. NEVER had a problem from any of my Toyotas
     
  3. Nov 26, 2008 at 8:01 PM
    #3
    -TRDMAN-

    -TRDMAN- ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    I was told to shift alot for the first few hundred miles or so.... like stay away from interstate..... i think it is to break in the clutch assembly..... dosen't matter to me i only use my clutch in first anyhow.....
     
  4. Nov 26, 2008 at 9:30 PM
    #4
    WilsonTheDog

    WilsonTheDog Kylie's dad

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    I followed the break in as stated in the manual. I don't really think it makes a difference but I always follow the manual when it comes to that.
     
  5. Nov 27, 2008 at 5:21 AM
    #5
    Brunes

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    I saw that mototune article before I bought my bike and it makes alot of sense. Today's engines are very finely honed- so you get very little opportunity to seat them right.

    Drive it like you are going to drive it day to day- avoiding steady speeds early-as that will seat the piston rings and associated items while the hone is still on the cylinder and it will get the engine ready for what it will face day to day.

    Gotta practice like you play...
     
  6. Nov 27, 2008 at 5:22 AM
    #6
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Moderator

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    Those articals are for "fresh" engines. I have tried both ways on my bikes, and found no difference. After an engine is completed (Mass produced automotive engines) they are run in with an electric motor to make sure valves are seated, rings, all metal surfaces (to some degree), and oil psi is up to spec with no leaks. Not much you can do to a new car/truck angine to cause long term problems from a poor break in procedure.
     
  7. Nov 27, 2008 at 5:27 AM
    #7
    007Tacoma

    007Tacoma I dub thee malicious!

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    True, but some engines are not tolerant of hard driving conditions over long periods of time. Many of the old Acura V6s had issues with being ragged out all the time. They quickly developed oil leaks and busted piston rings - to say nothing of failing automatic transmissions. I have seen several old Acura Legends that ran like crap and smoked like chimney.

    Sad... I really liked my Acura Legend. :pout:
     
  8. Nov 27, 2008 at 5:46 AM
    #8
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Moderator

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    True. Im not sure what year they started running engines in at the factory. I mentioned in a previous post, that I read about this in Popular Mechanics, and saw a show on the discovery channel in which they went over the break in procedure at the factory. I think alot of it depends on how the engine was made. When I re built my Chevy 283 and bored it .40 over ( in 1962 the casting was changed to allow for 4" bores, and this was on a 1968 engine,before I get someone to say "you cant do that" :)), I ran the engine at 1000 pm for 1 hour, changed the oil, ran it again at 2000 rpm, changed the oil, then ran it for a while a differing rpms, never under WOT, for a week, changed the oil, compression tested, took heads off, inspected, then more oil, and called it good. BUT, this was a pretty "Hopped up" engine, so I wanted to be carefull.
     
  9. Nov 27, 2008 at 6:19 AM
    #9
    007Tacoma

    007Tacoma I dub thee malicious!

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    YOU CAN'T DO THAT!!!


    Sorry, I had to. :D I wish I had the expertise/tools to do that kind of work on an engine. :(
     
  10. Nov 27, 2008 at 7:49 AM
    #10
    Jeff

    Jeff Well-Known Member

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    I just read the article and thanks for passing that on. Years ago I had rebuilt (early 70's) a Triumph 650 twin that I had ridden and inadvertantly knocked the manual choke lever full on and the rich conditions did not do much good to the engine, of course we eventually found out what the problem was. So I decided to rebuild it , after taking the cyclinders to a very good bike builder for over size honing, he did give me some advice on breaking in the new engine.
    Realize this is info from the late 60's, long before high tech engines and precision engine building.
    After assembly and before start up, he suggested I put a certain ratio of Marvel Mystery Oil , in with the gas , providing a little extra lubrication on a new engine. He also told me to drive it medium speed around town during warm up and then a whole lot faster on our rural roads, here in MA. However, he did stress not over over rev it or leave it at one rpm speed for a long time, varying the rpms over it rev scale.
    It was to get two to three tanks of fuel and Mystery oil and then change the engine oil and use the max oil weight approved and return to straight gas... he then considered the engine broken in, suitable for full throttle and bouncing the tach at the limit. This machinist built race engines, all classes of bike engines and street motors.
    I don't know what his recommendation for other engines was but the info supplied was for rebuilt bike engines. I cannot remember how many miles 3 tanks of gas would have been on that Trumpet.
    The engine always ran very well and I always remembered to be sure the choke lever was in the correct position. This was not the hotter twin carbed motor of that era, but the single carb twin, but it sure held its own. Had it for a number of years with no motor problems.

    I have followed the time honored way I always broke in new engines, low to medium rpms, no lugging of the motor, shifting often, ALWAYS allowing the engine to completely warm up and varying the engine speeds and thus rpm's , which included trips on the highway.
    Not sure if I would like to chance hard earned money as I really could not afford to buy a new truck if this system did not work out.....

    All that being said I would like to here more on this style of break in.... things change as does the style of modern engine building and modern machining techniques and modern materials.
    Just consider modern race engines in the past number of years, 1000hp out of 1.5 litre, turbo engines, V-10's, V-12's of around 3 litres making 900 hp at 15 thousand rpm and modern day F1 motors making 800hp out of 2.4 litres, reving to 21 thousand rpm's.
    Jeff, 06,V6,6spd, 4x4 SR5
     
  11. Nov 27, 2008 at 1:01 PM
    #11
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Moderator

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    Break in procedure for a Brand new engine or rebuilt engine:
    A break-in period is required when an engine is new or whenever the cylinder walls have been re-conditioned to accept new piston rings. An engine break-in "seats" the piston rings against the cylinder walls to minimize both oil consumption and blow-by of combustion gases. The cylinder walls are honed with abrasive stones to produce a "cross-hatch" surface that consists of microscopic peaks and valleys (see figure 1). During a proper break-in, the sharp peaks are flattened by interaction with the rings while the valleys are left intact. The flattened peaks provide a bearing surface for the piston rings to seal against cylinder walls, while the valleys provide an oil reservoir for lubrication.
    [​IMG]Figure 1. Graphical presentation of the microscopic surface of the cylinder wall.

    If the break-in is not performed correctly, the peaks can remain sharp allowing excessive oil retention in the valleys or the peaks may "roll over" into the valleys (glazing) preventing necessary oil retention. Blow-by occurs when the hot combustion gases and combustion by-products go past the rings and into the crankcase section of the engine. When blow-by is minimized, the engine runs cooler, cleaner, and more efficiently. When blow-by is excessive (when the rings are not seated properly or when the rings are worn), engine oil becomes contaminated with combustion gases and by-products and the pressurized crankcase causes oil vapor to be expelled through the crankcase ventilation system into the atmosphere or air intake system. Oil consumption will be increased also if the peaks are not flattened during break-in. The excess oil filling the "valleys" in the cylinder wall is burned every combustion stroke.
    So what is the proper break-in procedure for rings and how long does it take? First, there may be other concerns that should be considered when first firing-up a new engine, such as lubrication to the bearings, timing, and valve adjustments. Otherwise, the generally accepted procedure is as follows. Fill the engine with the appropriate amount of 10W30-weight, petroleum-based oil. Start the engine and let it run for about 20 minutes at low (about 2000) RPM. Drain the oil while it's hot and inspect the oil for metal particles. There should be no chunks of aluminum, brass, iron, or steel. Refill with oil (see below for type) and drive the car (after any other considerations have been addressed) for 500 miles and drain the oil again. During those first 500 miles, the loading on the rings should be moderate and varying. This is accomplished by varying speeds (no long-distance constant speeds, especially full-throttle) and occasionally increasing the cylinder pressures by quick acceleration or full-throttle uphill climbs.

    Now, If break in wasnt performed at the factory on Toyota engines, how many people would stick to this rule? Why do you think the owners manual calls for an oil change @ 5000 miles right off the show room floor? Because the engine is already broken in. :)
     
  12. Nov 27, 2008 at 1:33 PM
    #12
    TRDATER

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    Very few engines automotive wise need break in time , there have been many studies and tests even by consumer reports to back this up. Motors have come a long way so has technology you can legitimately start with synthetic from mile 1 . Someone else i believe also just posted a test done on new york city cabs reinforcing this theory a few days ago. Many vehicles today are coming with syhthetic right from the factory, this is a good sign it means quality components are going into todays engines.
     
  13. Nov 27, 2008 at 2:56 PM
    #13
    WilsonTheDog

    WilsonTheDog Kylie's dad

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    You're right. I mean, I still change the initial fill at 1500 on a new vehicle (I guess I'm old school?) because it makes me feel better but there's probably no really legit reason other than that.
     
  14. Nov 27, 2008 at 8:31 PM
    #14
    myrcrocks

    myrcrocks The Reasonable One

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    I followed the same procedure on my new 2009 as I have on my new sportbikes. It is the same break-in procedure as used in the aircraft industry...
     
  15. Nov 27, 2008 at 8:52 PM
    #15
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Moderator

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    Motorcycles dont have their engines run in like auto engines do.
     
  16. Nov 27, 2008 at 9:05 PM
    #16
    myrcrocks

    myrcrocks The Reasonable One

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    Apparently I wasted my time, lol... It probably couldn't hurt anything though...
     
  17. Nov 27, 2008 at 9:08 PM
    #17
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Moderator

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    LOL, didnt waste any time. :) Im sure there are many people that may wonder what engines are run in at the factory and which are not. :proposetoast:
     
  18. Nov 27, 2008 at 9:10 PM
    #18
    myrcrocks

    myrcrocks The Reasonable One

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    True enough!
     
  19. Nov 28, 2008 at 3:16 PM
    #19
    TRDATER

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    Chris did that info come from a 1960s service manual.
     
  20. Nov 28, 2008 at 4:16 PM
    #20
    chris4x4

    chris4x4 With sufficient thrust, pigs fly just fine. Moderator

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    which info? The way I did it on my V8, was the way an engine builder friend of mine suggested. The Post I made above, was what I found online.
     
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