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Fuel Filter Replacement

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas (1995-2004)' started by Timmah!, Aug 25, 2017.

  1. Aug 25, 2017 at 9:19 AM
    #1
    Timmah!

    Timmah! [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Hello again my 1st Gen Tacoma Brothers,

    My buddy Sean and I have another video for you. If you want to know how to safely replace your fuel filter, here's a video showing you how to do it.

    Here's the video and Enjoy the Show!

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vdDhXZIs6Lo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
  2. Aug 25, 2017 at 9:27 AM
    #2
    ThunderOne

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  3. Aug 25, 2017 at 9:38 AM
    #3
    RysiuM

    RysiuM Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Tim, I watched it out of curiosity. Great video as always. You got it very easy in your 4Runner. In 4cyl Tacoma this more PITA job.

    By the way, the manual says to run the engine till it dies to relieve the pressure. Fuel is a liquid, it doesn't compress so the only "static" pressure is from the all components expanding the volume (like the walls of fuel filter itself). But that is maybe few drops, nothing more. The more fuel will drip if your fuel tank is under pressure (like warm day) and this will push the fuel through the line - that would be much more volume. But probably the fuel pump will not allow the fuel to sip through gears (unless the pump is worn quite a bit) and on return overflow line I suspect there is a check valve (not sure about that). So either way relieving the fuel pressure from the line is not from protecting you from the fuel pouring out of the line but from getting a squirt of fuel into your eyes when you unscrew the first nut.
     
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  4. Aug 25, 2017 at 9:40 AM
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    OneWheelPeel

    OneWheelPeel Well-Known Member

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  5. Aug 25, 2017 at 9:52 AM
    #5
    Timmah!

    Timmah! [OP] Well-Known Member

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    The more people we empower to handle their own repairs and mods the better. Dealerships and shops charge hefty hourly rates and they often don't cut their customers any slack. If the job bills 3 hours but they can do it in a hour and half, they still charge for 3 hours. And if you're unlucky to come across a dishonest shop, they'll really stick it to you especially people who they assume know little about auto mechanics. Women regularly get taken to the cleaners because most of them haven't learned about auto mechanics. My girlfriend took her little convertible BMW to a shop for an oil change because I was really busy at the time and she didn't want to bother me. The shop noticed her front right strut had a leak. They tried to get her to replace them for the low, low price of $750. I bought the struts on Amazon for $150 and taught myself how to use spring compressors I rented for free at O'Reillys.

    On top of the hefty rates shop charge, they often screw things up. I've heard this over and over and over again. So, you get charged an arm and a leg and they botch the job. There's some things I probably wouldn't tackle like rebuilding an engine or transmission but I'm going to do my best to handle most things myself. Who's going to do the best job working on my rig? Me, because I'm going to do the research and take my time to make sure it's done right. I'm not in a hurry to get to the next job like most of these paid mechanics are. There are good mechanics out there but there's also a lot of bad ones.

    Happy Wrenching Dudes!
     
    OG_Tacoma, frenchee, DrZ and 9 others like this.
  6. Aug 25, 2017 at 9:59 AM
    #6
    Timmah!

    Timmah! [OP] Well-Known Member

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    You're right and I wish I would have clarified in the video a little more in regards to the importance of relieving the pressure. In addition to the squirt of fuel that could come out if the line was still under pressure is the ease at which the fittings will come apart. Any time a fitting or valve is under pressure, it's harder to break free or turn. I see this all the time in my job as a firefighter engineer. Discharge caps and valves are way harder to turn when the piping is pressurized. Reducing the pressure on the pump, turning the pump off, or opening up a drain relieves the pressure and makes it easier to turn valves and remove caps.
     
    RysiuM likes this.
  7. Aug 25, 2017 at 10:36 AM
    #7
    RysiuM

    RysiuM Well-Known Member

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    Good point. Did not think about that.
     
  8. Aug 25, 2017 at 11:01 AM
    #8
    RysiuM

    RysiuM Well-Known Member

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    My son learned that the hard way - he did not want to listen to me that replacing EGR is an easy job. He gave his Vauxhall Astra turbo diesel for EGR valve replacement, and I had to pick the car up (my son was traveling then).

    I don't take BS about cars. I'm wrenching my cars for to many years (including Piece Of Shit Fiat I had for 8 years, but that is very long story :)). Anyway the shop owner told me the mechanic did not replace EGR valve because there was too much deposits in all intake passages all the way to throttle body (I had it recorded) and in order to clean it they will have to take the whole engine out. Throttle body !!! In a diesel !!! I called him on it and asked him to show me throttle body in my son's car. And that stupid mechanic walked me to the car probably thinking he can show me any intake part instead. You should have seen his face when he realized he can't BS me.

    My son learned (by paying cash) that it is cheaper, faster and better to do many things in a car himself (with my help). Some special tools we had to buy (few big torx bits and sockets) were fraction of what he had to pay the guy. We found the intake was clean, because the EGR cooler was all clogged. We cleaned it all, put a new EGR valve and called off the day. I'm richer by two sets of torx bits and sockets.:broccoli:
     
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  9. Aug 25, 2017 at 5:12 PM
    #9
    Timmah!

    Timmah! [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I have to admit I have a tool buying disorder. Since I started the YouTube channel with my buddy Sean, I've spent thousands. I haven't added it up because it's probably best I don't know. I am loving the tool arsenal I have now though. It's awesome to have so many options at your disposal instead of a crescent wrench, screwdriver and pair of channel locks. Having the right tool for the job makes things much easier. However, I am always impressed with the Macgyver ways people get things done when they don't own a certain tool.
     
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  10. Aug 26, 2017 at 7:24 AM
    #10
    skeezix

    skeezix Well-Known Member

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    When I replaced my fuel filter I loosened the "out" fitting until it began to drip into a pan that I had placed underneath. After 5 or 6 minutes the fuel had stopped dripping and I then replaced the filter.

    No fuel mess, no special tools, no tearing apart the carpeting, no disconnecting anything, and no gas in the eyeballs.

    Patience is free and it goes a long, long way.
     
    ToxicTwin likes this.
  11. Aug 26, 2017 at 7:52 AM
    #11
    Timmah!

    Timmah! [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Dude, you're way of replacing the filter was similar to how i did it the first time years ago. But, I figured I'd show the way the factory service manual suggests to do it to offer a more complete tutorial of the job. Like I mentioned above, fittings under pressure are harder to break free. For someone who's not dealing with corrosion issues like those poor dudes in the rust belts of the country where they salt the roads, you'll probably be fine with the way you did yours. But, if there is corrosion issues, maybe relieving that fuel line pressure is the difference between a stripped flare nut fitting and lots of cursing and getting the job done successfully.

    If you're referring to flare nut wrenches as a special tool, I'd have to disagree. A flare nut wrench is the correct tool for the job and should be used any time dealing with flare nut fittings. They're not that expensive and they come in really handy when working on fuel lines, AC lines and brake lines. You could use an open end wrench or even a crescent wrench but you increase your chances of rounding off the fitting and then being pissed off at yourself for not using the right tool for the job.

    Lifting the back seat, taking off that trim piece, removing that access hatch and disconnecting the power to the fuel pump is a 5-10 minute job. If it means you have a better chance of loosening the fittings without damaging them, I'd say it's time well spent.

    On the same note, having the patience to do the necessary steps to ensure your success goes a long way too.
     
  12. Sep 4, 2017 at 7:03 PM
    #12
    Sodom

    Sodom Well-Known Member

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    Nice video.

    So when Toyota does a frame swap, I assume they do not disconnect the fuel lines from the fuel filter, and rather transfer it over in one piece? Mine must have never been removed, because I am having lots of trouble breaking free the 14mm flare nuts on the fuel filter. The one on the inlet side is rounding off, even though I'm using a flare nut wrench. I've also been spraying PB Blaster on it for a while. Anybody have any tips?

    Wondering if I should use something like this to cut out the sections around the fuel filter. Or should I replace the whole line.

    Rust sucks.
     
  13. Sep 5, 2017 at 12:53 AM
    #13
    RysiuM

    RysiuM Well-Known Member

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    If your nut is already round (I know it sounds funny) then you may try to use this (even more funny)
    [​IMG]

    It will mangle the nut even more but if this doesn't break it then nothing will (man this is so bad :D)
     
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  14. Sep 5, 2017 at 1:18 AM
    #14
    Dalandser

    Dalandser ¡Me Gustan Las Tacos-mas!

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    And I thought getting my middle part stuck in a zipper was bad - y'all don't play in Poland. :eek:
     
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  15. Sep 5, 2017 at 6:10 AM
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    RysiuM

    RysiuM Well-Known Member

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    This is getting downhill very fast :yay::yes:
     
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  16. Nov 8, 2018 at 1:46 PM
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    rogerman

    rogerman Well-Known Member

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    small kine revival. I watched the video and appreciate immensely the time and attention you put in for us toyota folk.
    I attempted to change my fuel filter but the flare nut closest to the engine is rounded, what is the best way to approach this? I have vice grips as per @RysiuM lol but I'm worried about the cost of nut freedom.
     
  17. Nov 8, 2018 at 2:12 PM
    #17
    Timmah!

    Timmah! [OP] Well-Known Member

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    With the rounded off fitting you really should replace the whole line. If you can find a 1st Gen Tacoma at a wrecking yard, you can pull the fuel line off you need and save a bunch of money. If not, you'll have to buy a new line from Toyota. I'd get the needed line first before removing the line with a vice grips. Those lines need to be pretty damn tight to not leak and you might not be able to get it tight enough with the fitting rounded off.
     
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  18. Nov 8, 2018 at 2:14 PM
    #18
    rogerman

    rogerman Well-Known Member

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    Ok understood. Finding used 1st gen tacoma parts is difficult on Oahu. I'll poke around ebay. @Timmah! Thank you for the quick response!

    Edit- Ordered new genuine line from lynch toyota. It was on sale for less that $30 and shipped for less than $40. Price wasn't as bad as I thought. In case anyone is going down this road: 77251-04090 Tube Fuel Main Front I think this is for 95- late 00 tacomas.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018
  19. Nov 12, 2018 at 12:14 AM
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    Waveblader

    Waveblader New Member

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    Roger man
    I'm new to tw and also on oahu. I have a 02 tac and am experiencing poor performance on my motor. I suspected the fuel filter but no help. What was the reason you replaced yours?
     
  20. Nov 12, 2018 at 12:24 AM
    #20
    rogerman

    rogerman Well-Known Member

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    Howsit man! I haven’t changed the filter yet, since the flare nut facing the engine is rounded. I ordered new fuel line as per @Timmah! suggestion. I’ll keep y’all posted.
     

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