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Getting excited to go wheelin - safety

Discussion in '1st Gen. Tacomas (1995-2004)' started by ZrowGz, Mar 24, 2018.

  1. Mar 24, 2018 at 1:52 AM
    #1
    ZrowGz

    ZrowGz [OP] I'm a n00b.

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    been reading threads and seen lists of things to bring. Of course as a newbie, I currently have very little besides a winch. Need to get some tow straps, D rings... new tires would probably help all around which means I should get aluminum 17s.

    What is in your rescue equipment? What do you use most? What do you wish you had? Spare parts?

    I think first thing for me is a spare tire. Second, a system to elevate rig to install said tire. Recommendations on jacks, attachments, stabilizers? I know hi jacks are dangerous. But it kinda seems like a decent way to lift a rig as long as you exercise maximum precautions...

    I’m hoping to explore Capitol reef and potentially The Maze in a month.

    Recommendations on any or all?
     
  2. Mar 24, 2018 at 7:09 AM
    #2
    zbadboy

    zbadboy Well-Known Member

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    Save your lint from your dryer lint trap. Put it in a zip lock baggie with some matches. If you ever need a fire, this will help start it. Put it with your first aide kit. :)
     
    lukester78 likes this.
  3. Mar 24, 2018 at 7:17 AM
    #3
    FromTejasWithLove

    FromTejasWithLove Well-Known Member

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    One of the absolute best pieces of rescue gear you can have is a friend in their own rig. Most issues can be resolved by having that extra set of wheels, either to pull yourself out of something or to transport you out til proper rescue is procured.

    If you already have a winch, a snatch block is an extremely beneficial tool to have and understand.

    17" wheels will give access to more options for tires, but don't think it's particularly required. I run the BF Goodrich All-Terrain KO2 @ LT235/75/15 and have been extremely pleased with their prowess. Bigger tires also require more power to turn through the mire.
    Also though, yes, a Spare Tire is a big deal and should be a rather high priority.

    I also travel with a 20 ton hydraulic hand-pump bottle jack, 6-20" range.
    Also one of my personal favorites: The Handle-All
    I seriously use this thing all the time. Between the four tool heads, there is always a demand of some sort.

    Lastly, I'm down in the St. George area and have yet to make it up to the Capitol Reef/ The Maze area. I would gladly run as your wheeling buddy if the timing works out; I'm young, fit and hip! :bananadance:
    I'm off Sunday's and Wednesdays!
    Be safe, think smart, show patience. It's not a race but an experience and it's always better to keep all your fingers and toes.
     
    ZrowGz [OP] likes this.
  4. Mar 24, 2018 at 8:17 AM
    #4
    SportsmanJake

    SportsmanJake Well-Known Member

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    People have written huge books on this topic op.

    I'd say knowledge is an important one. If you don't know how to use your stuff, then it is at best useless, and at worse, dangerous to yourself.
     
    ZrowGz [OP] likes this.
  5. Mar 24, 2018 at 8:24 AM
    #5
    ZrowGz

    ZrowGz [OP] I'm a n00b.

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    Haha love it. I’m an icu nurse so my first aid kit is pretty spectacular ;)
     
  6. Mar 24, 2018 at 8:30 AM
    #6
    zbadboy

    zbadboy Well-Known Member

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    Just thought I would throw that out there. A couple military buddies and I use to teach a survival class to parents and their children. The simple things can save your life....a simple mistake can take your life! Thank you for the lives you save.:thumbsup:
     
  7. Mar 25, 2018 at 8:18 AM
    #7
    preybird1

    preybird1 02 taco on 37's

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    be careful and only use straps or kinetic tow ropes so people don't get hurt. do it right or you'll be sorry.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETFFeUoq5Vw
    Ive seen the 2nd part of this video and i don't recommend it so i didn't post it. It's really just too gory
     
  8. Mar 25, 2018 at 8:44 AM
    #8
    tan4x4

    tan4x4 Well-Known Member

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    The Hi-Lift jack, or equivalent, is the best jack to use on non-solid and/or un-even ground.
    However, it needs an appropriate jacking point to 'hook' onto. A stock truck likely will not have any.
    When I used my hi-lift, I used my welded-on sliders or aftermarket bumper as jacking points.

    Also, you should carry a short 'tree-saver' strap. Not essential for rescue, but just the right
    thing to do to avoid damaging the tree that you might be winching toward.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2018
    ZrowGz [OP] likes this.
  9. Mar 25, 2018 at 8:57 AM
    #9
    ZrowGz

    ZrowGz [OP] I'm a n00b.

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    Oh my god. That's messed up. It is basically the same thought between static rappeling ropes and dynamic climbing ropes. You gotta dissipate the energy before something gives. Climbing, it's your body that gives. Oof, brutal video.
     
  10. Mar 25, 2018 at 9:03 AM
    #10
    what road

    what road Apprentice of the Derp

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    alot still need done
    depending how far you go. CB radio or HAM radio, a SPOT device and if you go real remote a Sat. phone
     
  11. Mar 25, 2018 at 9:19 AM
    #11
    slander

    slander Well-Known Member

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    Wear your seatbelt at all times. That injures and kills more wheelers it seems than recovery and jacking up the vehicle. Toss your tire under the truck and use that as a jackstand if you have to jack it up/work on it. Like others said, dont go solo.
     
  12. Apr 3, 2018 at 5:25 AM
    #12
    ZrowGz

    ZrowGz [OP] I'm a n00b.

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    For the hi jack, what adapter/fitting pieces do you folks use to make it safer? I’ve seen several variations on slider adaptors. There’s also those different stabilizing bases, one of which had cable that you run up to the hi jack to really increase stability.

    What straps do you recommend? Diameter, length, load capacity... definitely don’t want to tow with static lines.
     
  13. Apr 3, 2018 at 6:00 AM
    #13
    Indy

    Indy Master of all I survey.

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    Most off roaders have decided the best pace to keep your hilift is at the store. If if you have one already, in the garage waiting for your next garage sale.
    Most of us carried a small floor jack instead and exhaust jacks are pretty cool.

    For a winch you need at least a coiple d rings, a pulley and a tree saver. If you're equipped properly a winch can pull you forward, backwards and sidewaya. A portable anchor is a good thing to have as well. A recovery strap and another vehicle works easier than a winch most of the time.
     
  14. Apr 3, 2018 at 7:36 AM
    #14
    slander

    slander Well-Known Member

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    We use the hi lift as is, it grips to tube just fine. I agree with the above to keep the stock jack as well really really handy, however I disagree with the above in that to leave the hi lift at home. It's an invaluable tool to get you unstuck off road and is extreamly handy if you know how to use it. I have jacked it up all the way and driven off the jack a few times to get unstuck, pushed off of rocks etc... It's a tool that's constantly trying to kill you, but it's instability also makes it extreamly usefull. Even with winches and other vehicles, sometimes the safest/easiest way to recover is to use the hilift.
     

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