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Hauling a motorcycle

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Geoff.in.nc, Aug 22, 2017.

  1. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:38 AM
    #1
    Geoff.in.nc

    Geoff.in.nc [OP] Hey y'all, watch this!

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    I'm not a motorcycle guy (yet), so I need some experienced advice. In a couple weeks I'm going to be hauling a medium/smallish size bike (Honda Rebel 450) from NY to NC in my DCLB. I need tips and gotchas and any help you can give.

    Any recommendations for ramps? Is strapping the bike to the movable bed rail cleats going to be safe? Anything else you can think of? Thanks in advance everyone!
     
  2. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:48 AM
    #2
    BKTaco

    BKTaco Well-Known Member

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    I'm not a motorcycle guy either - but I recently did move and needed straps that wouldn't damage valuable cargo. I found these... --> https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AS5QCKS/ref=twister_B06XJ2W2FT?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1 <-- They worked great for what I needed them for and can only imagine that they would work that much better in a real motorcycle application. Again, no experience - just a similar product application.
     
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  3. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:51 AM
    #3
    knottyrope

    knottyrope Well-Known Member

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    hauled my VMAX 1200 in mine but only for about 15 miles
    And hauled my tractor that weighs 750 lbs for an hour
     
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  4. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:56 AM
    #4
    tempest766

    tempest766 New Member

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    Take advantage of the trailer hitch receiver and rent a u-haul trailer. it's much easier than getting a bike into and out of the pickup bed. I've done both and the extra money for the rental is worth it.
     
  5. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:57 AM
    #5
    loosnut

    loosnut Well-Known Member

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    What kinda bike?
     
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  6. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:58 AM
    #6
    Harry

    Harry Science, Bitches

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    I've hauled bikes using the bed cleats - they'll be fine as long as you're not bouncing down trails.

    Definitely use soft tie downs, and secure the bike at the lower triple clamp instead of the handlebars if possible. Secure the rear wheel by the d-rings in the back of the bed.

    But as others have mentioned, trailers make the job a lot easier.
     
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  7. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:58 AM
    #7
    Beauty or Beast

    Beauty or Beast Well-Known Member

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    You'll need either a tri-fold or two separate ramps, plus a good place to back up to close that's fairly level with your bed to make it easier. I've hauled 2 in my DCSB, having a level plane to push it up and in is handy as they don't have a lot of clearance for where the ramps meat the tailgate and bow.

    As for rail cleats, I don't really trust them for this. All you really need are the 2 u-bolts at the front, one strap per side from them to the handlebars. That's all the tie down I ever used, rachet it down to load the suspension, don't strap it down on the kickstand: make it stand up straight. I always grabbed the seat after I strapped it and shook it while standing on the ground, the whole bed/truck should move with the bike.

    You'll probably get other input but all the times I've moved mine, never had an issue yet. Or a small trailer works good too...

    Harley.jpg
     
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  8. Aug 22, 2017 at 8:59 AM
    #8
    devildog0327

    devildog0327 Well-Known Member

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    Whatever I learn from you guys
    I would not recommend using the the rail system but it does work fine (didn't like how it bends up) and prefer using the D rings. I like using the curved foldable ramps and strap that to the tow hooks. A canyon dancer also helps strapping the bike down. I do highly recommend buying a Baxley Chock which will hold your bike upright on or off the truck.

    LOL, whatever you choose don't try riding your bike up the ramp!

    ETA: I did prefer my foldable trailer when I hauled my bikes to the track
     
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  9. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:01 AM
    #9
    Geoff.in.nc

    Geoff.in.nc [OP] Hey y'all, watch this!

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    Honda Rebel 450.... Fairly small.... Specs say it weighs around 400lbs wet
     
  10. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:02 AM
    #10
    uhplifted

    uhplifted The Hopfather

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    For my dirt bike I put 2 up front on to the D ring whatever you wanna call it on the side of the bed and then one on the D ring in the back of the bed attached to the subframe. Not sure how heavy a rebel is but as someone else said a trailer might be nice. Not necessary but maybe helpful.
     
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  11. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:06 AM
    #11
    loosnut

    loosnut Well-Known Member

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    I have hauled a rebel 250,You will be fine with the 2 straps to the bed cleats,and then 2 to the d-rings in the rear.
     
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  12. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:13 AM
    #12
    Harry

    Harry Science, Bitches

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    I forgot to mention this and kind of surprised nobody else did yet, but my last pro tip:

    If you're hauling down the interstate you'll probably take breaks. Get a big-ass cable lock and run it through the wheels, bed cleat and/or d-rings. You'll be amazed at how fast thieves can unload a bike - and they are out there.
     
  13. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:21 AM
    #13
    PerazziMx14

    PerazziMx14 I'm fat but identify as skinny, I'm Trans-slender

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    Close to 39.9609243°N, -77.5763777°W
    I am a "motorcycle" guy (currently 6 in the stable) and what works well for me is ramp, wheel chock, Canyon dancer and 2 ratchet straps.

    - Ramp. I use a 8" wide by 66" long steel ramp from HF. Heavy as hell and indestructible. I hate it because of the weight but the price was right so I deal with it.
    - Wheel chock goes against the bed wall (HF has a decent wheel chock. Personal preference is a Baxley Sport chock)
    - Motorcycle front wheel is rolled into wheel chock
    - Canyon dancer over the grips
    - Ratchet strap from the loops in the canyon dancer to a low forward tie down point. When ratcheting the front end down you are not seeing how far you can get the front suspension to compress. You can easily compress it the entire way and this is not a good thing. The idea is to equally tighten the ratchet straps until the front suspension is compressed about 1/3rd of the way. This more than adequate to hold the bike for 1 mile or around the world.

    I only use 2 ratchet straps on the front of the bike and let the rear "float". No sense compressing the rear suspension for no reason.

    I have sold bikes and watched the new owner use 4 or 6 ratchet straps binding the bike down so tightly it becomes part of the truck. Or the put the bike on the side stand and use it a a 5 the support leg. It is way overkill and can actually do damage to the suspension, frame or side stand. But unless asked I do not offer an opinion and watch them squash the bike to death.
     
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  14. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:22 AM
    #14
    Geoff.in.nc

    Geoff.in.nc [OP] Hey y'all, watch this!

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    I wish I could like this multiple times!
     
  15. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:24 AM
    #15
    bluezzy

    bluezzy Love My SuperCharged 07 Sport!

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    in the bed.jpg
    index.jpg

    Here I used a dirt bank to load up the bike but I do have a ramp like this one to load it up with, works pretty well.

    Oh yah, I use just regular straps to tied it down to the D-rings located on on each front corner of the bed.
     
  16. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:30 AM
    #16
    motodude95

    motodude95 Well-Known Member

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    I've hauled all types of bikes over hundreds of miles. Grab a Uhaul motorcycle trailer, its 15 bucks flat. Has a ramp and is really easy to load. There is a little slot for the front tire on those trailers. Push the bike all the way in, put two straps where the handle bars and fork meet, clamp em down to each corner really tight. Then you can put one strap through the rear wheel and clamp both sides down to secure the rear. Try to use microfiber towels or something on the handlebars where the straps are so they don't get scratched.


    MOST IMPORTANTLY MAKE SURE THERE IS A TON OF PRESSURE ON THE SIDE WITH THE KICKSTAND. The bike will not fall over during turns if all the pressure from the straps is pulling the bike onto the kickstand side. That is key. Make sure when you're releasing the bike when you're done towing you undo the other side first so all the pressure stays on the kickstand.
     
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  17. Aug 22, 2017 at 9:35 AM
    #17
    16Tacos

    16Tacos Well-Known Member

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    I agree with this, a long curved ramp and canyon dancer is really nice. I don't use the bed rails as they're not meant to take a vertical load. I would install D-rings in the front of the bed or get a bar like the one I've linked (it's one of the best mods I've done to my truck).
    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/fs-motorcycle-tie-down-bar-the-best-one-you-can-buy.334216/

    I ride my dirtbike up the ramp :bikewheelie2:because my truck is lifted and I can't push it up by myself. I have a ramp that is as wide as the bed though so it's really pretty easy. Can't get my streetbike into my bed anymore because the ramp angles are to high and I bottom out on the belly pan.
     
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  18. Aug 22, 2017 at 10:03 AM
    #18
    eccracer104

    eccracer104 O.G. Member

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    If you have someone to help you you'll be able to get it into the bed with a quality ramp and a set of canyon dancers for the bars. You'll want a set of canyon dancers off the bars, and a strap each side. Two more straps from the rear of the bike pulling back, and for good measure two more straps from the triple clamps to another front tie down point.

    If you're doing this alone rent a trailer. It'll make your life so much easier!

    I worked for a dealer for 5 years and have seen many attempts to load a bike that's too heavy for them to load alone or not experienced enough drop the bike trying to load it up. If you don't plan on carrying the bike around on a regular basis renting a trailer would be a more cost effective option as well, those ramps are actually pretty expensive and a trailer will typically have a ramp built into it.
     
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  19. Aug 22, 2017 at 10:17 AM
    #19
    bluezzy

    bluezzy Love My SuperCharged 07 Sport!

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    I hauled a full dressed Yamaha Venture for 800 miles with just the two front tied down straps and it stayed nice and tight and stable just fine
     
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  20. Aug 22, 2017 at 1:00 PM
    #20
    PerazziMx14

    PerazziMx14 I'm fat but identify as skinny, I'm Trans-slender

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    Close to 39.9609243°N, -77.5763777°W
    Follow these direction and your next post will be asking how to repair a bent side stand or damaged frame.
     
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