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How much bed weight do you use?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Rushbrook, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:14 AM
    #1
    Rushbrook

    Rushbrook [OP] Well-Known Member

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    After fishtailing for the 3rd time and crashing to the tune of 13k in repairs, I'm wondering how much additional weight you all put in the bed for inclement weather situations.

    I use 300lbs of gravel right over the wheels. I didn't have it when I crashed because it hadn't snowed all winter (WV). It just happened to put an isolated dusting that I encountered without warning.

    So during the whole repair process (still nto over), I find out the bed is a composite, which explains why it fishtails so easliy. I almost feel stupid for not knowing this, but I just thought it was a bedliner over steel.

    So, now I'm wondering..

    A. should keep some weight back there all the time (even in spring/summer) for balance, and how much?

    B. How much weight should I have back there for winter? We don't get huge snows, but it could be several inches.
     
  2. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:16 AM
    #2
    YFZ_TRD

    YFZ_TRD 4Runner Pilot

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    I know people that even two normal size sandbags makes a difference for them. No personal experience, sorry.
     
  3. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:18 AM
    #3
    wiscdave

    wiscdave Lets Do It!

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    nothing and just don't drive crazy...and I drive 4*4 pret'near every weekend.
     
  4. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:21 AM
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    ItalynStylion

    ItalynStylion Sounds Gooooood

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    The rear end steps out because you use too much skinny pedal. If you're in a situation where the traction is that low you should A) Use 4WD Hi or B) Don't drive.

    Sandbags will help but they shan't save you from improper throttle control and regular RWD.
     
  5. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:23 AM
    #5
    ontarioyota

    ontarioyota Well-Known Member

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    Blacked out badges-rims OME lift with 881's & dakar pacs with D6XL AAL, summer tires=BFG 31x10.5x15 on 93 4runner rims,winter= Pirelli Scorpion Ice&Snow on stock steelies,Flowmaster exhaust, deck plate mod
    350 lbs...really helps in the winter
     
  6. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:23 AM
    #6
    Voodoo Rufus

    Voodoo Rufus Well-Known Member

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    4x60lb. bags of tube sand strapped over the axle.
     
  7. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:24 AM
    #7
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

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    x2. Good tires make a huge difference also. Before I put on a shell, I put 270 lbs (3 - 90 lb tractor weights) in the front of the bed. I pushed them to the front because if you ever have to stop fast, the weights over your axle will come crashing to the front of the bed (or worse, through your rear window in the event of an accident).
     
  8. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:26 AM
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    ItalynStylion

    ItalynStylion Sounds Gooooood

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    Best advice so far. And for anyone who knows shit about yaw you'd realize having the weight closer to the center of the vehicle will also allow it to turn easier and prevent skids.
     
  9. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:27 AM
    #9
    elmo7

    elmo7 Easily Replaceable Member

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    So what caused the loss of control? Braking? Steering? Speed? I ask because I'm not sure you're looking for the right solution here. Typically the bed weight is used to gain traction under acceleration. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. I just don't see weight helping once you've lost control. It may assist some to keep the rear behind you once moving, but if you pop the brakes, you'd probably still bring the rear around due to weight transfer.
     
  10. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:32 AM
    #10
    DEEVON911

    DEEVON911 Semi-Pro

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    Sorry OP, but I have to agree with the others that said, just take it easy on the gas. I don't and have never used extra weight in the bed. I'm not saying its wrong to do so, I just don't want the added weight, so I can save alittle in MPG's. With that said though, if i was to go off roading or something in deep snow, I would use sand bags. Then you get the added beneifit of using the sand for aliitle extra traction.
     
  11. Feb 21, 2012 at 7:43 AM
    #11
    ontarioyota

    ontarioyota Well-Known Member

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    Key ingrediants for winter driving

    Designated snow/ice tires

    Easy on the gas pedal

    Easy on the brakes

    Do not tailgate!
     
  12. Feb 21, 2012 at 8:17 AM
    #12
    fslaugts

    fslaugts Member

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    I drive without the Spare Tire and I had the extra leaf spring installed. I have not had any problems. I drive fast when the roads are dry and much slower when they are wet.
     
  13. Feb 21, 2012 at 8:56 AM
    #13
    Rushbrook

    Rushbrook [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I appreciate the replies.

    I drive carefully in the snow, regardless of how much. I drive slow. I don't touch the brakes. I slow down using my gears. I take off in second gear. I have a brand new set of Terra Grapplers on the truck. I NEVER tailgate, regardless of what kind of road or weather conditions. I absolutely want to punch tailgaters in the face, unless it's before a football game. ;)

    In this particular case, it was a FREAK storm. I was driving my normal interstate speed, which is 75-ish, and it was above freezing temperature (around 35). Literally, I go under an overpass, and when I come out there's a dusting of snow. It wasn't snowing before I hit that overpass, and that snow only covered about a mile before it was gone again. Everyone involved with emergency services was like "that's the strangest snowstorm I've ever seen". Some speculated that it was actually a freezing fog because it was very, very foggy that morning. I never had a safe opportunity to even attempt to get it into 4WD.

    Now..I was going too fast, which contributed to my fishtail. When I saw the snow, I let off the accellerator gingerly and slowed to about 55 over the course of 1/8 mile or so before I got to the bridge where my accident happened. I would have been at 40 or slower if I'd had time, but I didn't want to hit the brakes. This has happened to me one other time on that same bridge (Was only going about 40 and I got control of it) and I've been behind another vehicle that took a spin there. I swear that thing gets colder than most bridges do.

    I'm no physics expert but I can't see how weight wouldn't help you in pretty much any situation. If that thing is way lighter in the the tail end, the front doesn't have the necessary traction support from the tail so when it slips, it goes wherever it feels like (usually just clumsily starts to rotate) and the tail tags along and the fishtail begins. If you're on dry pavement you'll still get better traction if the weight is evenly distributed, regardless of what kind of vehicle it is. It would seem that based on that alone, the ideal situation is to find out how much weight it would take to balance out the truck. Any additional weight in the rear end should also provide more surface contact for the drive wheel when in 2WD.
     
  14. Feb 21, 2012 at 9:13 AM
    #14
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

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    Added weight is a Catch 22. The idea is that you'll push your tires down, through the snow to the pavement or whatever hardpack is below it rather than riding on top of the snow. This gives you more traction and therefore more control. The downside is, more weight = more momemtum which means longer stopping distances.

    On dry pavement, you should not need extra weight, your tires should grip dry pavement with just the truck's weight. You don't need the extra weight and increased stopping distance given by extra weight when driving conditions are good. As far as balancing... it's a truck, top heavy and unbalanced. There are handling aids available such as rear sway bars if you feel you need them but added weight is not a good solution for better handling in most cases in my opinion.
     
  15. Feb 21, 2012 at 9:20 AM
    #15
    Rushbrook

    Rushbrook [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Good points. Thank you.

    My thought on added weight for a dry surface though is that there's more contact with the pavement due to the tire expanding under the added pressure. Sort-of like how drag racing cars lower the tire pressure. Granted, they would never do that on a dry road to keep traction at highway speeds because of added sidewall flex. In that case you'd want a wider tire with proper sidewall stability.
     
  16. Feb 21, 2012 at 9:32 AM
    #16
    Pugga

    Pugga Pasti-Dip Free 1983 - 2015... It was a good run

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    You could under-inflate the tires and get the same effect. If you load a vehicle to where the tires squat, you should adjust the tire pressure to compensate. Google, Chaulk Test for proper tire inflation. You want the tires to have even wear across the tread pattern. Good tires make the world of difference! If you want to push the limits of traction in all conditions, you should get dedicated tires for snow (tall, skinny and possibly studded if your state allows it) and another set of higher performance street tires for summer.
     
  17. Feb 21, 2012 at 9:56 AM
    #17
    RainDodger

    RainDodger YGWYPF

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    I put one of those ShurTrax (http://www.shurtrax.com/) water bladders back there. Love it. I leave it maybe half full most of the winter, and beef it up when it snows. It makes an amazing difference. In the spring, take it out and roll it up. I think it holds a good 350-400 lbs of water and it does not slosh around.

    Edit: make sure your headlights are lowered a bit, as the weight will raise their aim, as happens when you carry a load.
     
  18. Feb 21, 2012 at 11:02 AM
    #18
    Rushbrook

    Rushbrook [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Interesting idea RD. Looks pretty cool too..lol does it freeze or do you throw some anti in there?


    Thanks Pugga.
     
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