1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

How much of a lift? how big a tire? a summarization

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by NetMonkey, Aug 25, 2008.

  1. Aug 25, 2008 at 5:11 PM
    #1
    NetMonkey

    NetMonkey [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Member:
    #8536
    Messages:
    1,725
    Gender:
    Male
    Geogetown, TX
    Vehicle:
    2010, 4x4, DC, off-road, shortbed, automatic
    Toytec Ultimate Lift @ 3", Mickey Thompson MTZ's 285/75/16, Moto Metal 955b, rear 2" ALL, Marlin Crawler sliders
    i have been reading thread after thread on this site about tires and lifts and all the positives and negatives about how much to lift, tire sizes, lift types, and peoples experiences with what they have done. so, to sort it all out in my head, i have been taking notes on everything that i have read and i have started to see some general themes. i am by no means an expert here, but i wanted to show what most people are saying about the various lifts and their ramifications. for me, it came down to what i wanted to acheive vs the cost and ramifications. so maybe this will help out the next newbie to come to this forum :)

    enjoy...


    Tires
    • 265/75/16 or 265/70/17 on stock rims - should fit without any lift.
    • 265/75/16 or 265/70/17 on aftermartket rims (16/17x8, 4.5 backspace, 0 offset) - may need small lift <1.0".
    • 275/285 width will need aftermartket rims (16/17x8, 4.5 backspace, 0 offset) to avoid tires rubbing on coil.
    • tire height >= 32" will need 2-3" lift.
    • tire height >= 33" will need 3" lift and cutting/grinding to prevent tire rub.
    • tire height >= 35" will need 4-6" lift and cutting/grinding to prevent tire rub.
    • 16" rims and tires are generally cheaper than 17" rims and tires.
    • the same tire sizes can actually vary in overall diameter among different manufacturers. be sure to measure.
    Front Lifts (0.25-3.0")
    • spacer lift (0.25-3.0") - inexpensive - the kits will cost more.
      • above coil - not preloaded - spacer sits above coil assembly (easier install).
      • inside coil - preloads coil - spacer sits inside coil assembly and the coil must be compressed to install spacers (harder install).
    • shock lift (0.85-2.5")
      • bilstein 5100 - 4 shock positions (0.0, 0.85, 1.75, and 2.5") the latter 3 positions preload the coil to create lift. the coil must be compressed to install the shocks. very inexpensive.
    • coilover lift (2.0-3.0")
      • coil and shock assembly that replace the stock assembly. much better quality and durability than stock. usually preloaded to achive lift and can have an infinite number of height settings. very expensive.
    • Preloading coils
      • a preloaded coil will have a stiffer ride, but will help prevent body lean/roll and front end dive when breaking.
      • a non loaded coil will retain the factory ride.
    • Upper control arms.
      • UCA are neccessary to be able to properly adjust the camber/caster. if it is not adjusted properly, you will notice the truck wandering. (ie: not tracking straight down the road). recommended for lifts at 2.5" and neccessary for lifts at 3.0" for a proper allignment. moderately expensive.
    • Differential drop
      • decreases the shaft angle to prevent wear on the boot. recommended for lifts at 2.5" and neccessary for lifts at 3.0". very inexpensive.
    Front Lifts (4.0-6.0" and beyond)
    • Cradle lift
      • relocates the front differential and lower control arms farther away from the body to achieve lift. often requires cutting of cross members and welding. very, very expensive lift, but usually doesnt have the alignment and diff angle issue that the 3" lifts have. it can also accomdate tires 35" and larger.

    Rear Lifts (1-3")
    • TSB - adds an extra leaf in the rear. reports of raising from 0.75-1.5", but it can settle. amount of lift seems to vary from truck to truck. free from the dealer.
    • Block - easiest way to add a lift. will not settle, but can cause axle wrap and vibrations. very inexpensive.
    • Add a leaf/leaf packs - more leafs than the stock leaf pack to acheive lift (can settle over time). seems to have the best results with a minimum of axle wrap and vibrations. can be a little more expensive than the block method.
    • Shackle lift - replaces the shackle that holds the the leafs to the body. more expensive than blocks and add-a-leafs but cheaper than new springs. retains factory spring and ride lifts rear about 2.5"
     
  2. Aug 25, 2008 at 5:16 PM
    #2
    genxer36

    genxer36 Lord of Tomfoolery

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2007
    Member:
    #3442
    Messages:
    10,581
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Sean
    Bethlehem,GA
    Tow package, XM Satellite radio, K & N Air filter, & Channel Vent Visors
    Thanks for the post. +1 rep for you.
     
  3. Aug 25, 2008 at 5:29 PM
    #3
    350TacoZilla

    350TacoZilla Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    Member:
    #2767
    Messages:
    1,115
    Gender:
    Male
    Hancock MD
    Vehicle:
    1997 3RZ 5spd 4x4 Reg Cab
    2.7L 3RZ,K&N filter, 4" deck plate mod,flowmaster 40 series,3" suspension lift, hybrid 52"chevy/toyota rear springs.
    only one you are missing for rear is shackle lift (what I have) more expensive than blocks and add-a-leafs but cheaper than new springs... retains factory spring and ride lifts rear about 2.5"

    also there are whats called cradle lifts for front these are usually 4"+ they drop the entire front suspension down on a new cradle lifting the truck these are the kits that are $1400-2500 or so I think the main sizes for them are 4",6",10"
     
  4. Aug 25, 2008 at 5:38 PM
    #4
    NetMonkey

    NetMonkey [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Member:
    #8536
    Messages:
    1,725
    Gender:
    Male
    Geogetown, TX
    Vehicle:
    2010, 4x4, DC, off-road, shortbed, automatic
    Toytec Ultimate Lift @ 3", Mickey Thompson MTZ's 285/75/16, Moto Metal 955b, rear 2" ALL, Marlin Crawler sliders
    added :)
     
  5. Aug 25, 2008 at 5:40 PM
    #5
    jhodge83

    jhodge83 Any dog under 50# is a cat and cats are useless... Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Member:
    #1432
    Messages:
    28,092
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Jamie
    Moncks Corner, SC
    Vehicle:
    09 Timberland Mica DC 4WD Sport
    wat?
    05+ prerunners can get a 4" spindle lift as well...no worky for 4x4's though
     
  6. Aug 25, 2008 at 5:41 PM
    #6
    NetMonkey

    NetMonkey [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Member:
    #8536
    Messages:
    1,725
    Gender:
    Male
    Geogetown, TX
    Vehicle:
    2010, 4x4, DC, off-road, shortbed, automatic
    Toytec Ultimate Lift @ 3", Mickey Thompson MTZ's 285/75/16, Moto Metal 955b, rear 2" ALL, Marlin Crawler sliders
    ya... i was assuming 4x4 models.
     
  7. Aug 26, 2008 at 10:58 AM
    #7
    350TacoZilla

    350TacoZilla Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    Member:
    #2767
    Messages:
    1,115
    Gender:
    Male
    Hancock MD
    Vehicle:
    1997 3RZ 5spd 4x4 Reg Cab
    2.7L 3RZ,K&N filter, 4" deck plate mod,flowmaster 40 series,3" suspension lift, hybrid 52"chevy/toyota rear springs.
    oh and dont forget the complete idiots out there (yours truely) that do SAS swaps on taco's but it would be very hard to guess at the different lift heights you can gain through that considering I had 44's on mine and I have seen others that cleared 35's BARELY
     
To Top