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How to Change Front Brakes (Pads and Rotors)

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by LoadedTaco, Nov 24, 2014.

  1. Feb 23, 2019 at 7:17 AM
    #261
    eherlihy

    eherlihy Well-Known Member

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    The Callahan rotors that I instaled are unpainted - NO paint anywhere. Only bare steel showing once I sprayed them with brake cleaner. I noticed a couple of spots of rust already on the rotor. Curious if anyone has thoughts about painting the center of the rotor, or going au-naturel?
     
  2. Feb 23, 2019 at 8:54 AM
    #262
    mbrogz3000

    mbrogz3000 Well-Known Member

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    I’ve used rotors with e-coat painted hubs in the past- they look nice for a while until they are exposed to salt spray and corrosion. The wheels eventually remain stuck on. I wouldn’t recommend spending time (and the $10-$15 for quality primer and spray paint) painting the hubs.
     
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  3. Feb 23, 2019 at 5:57 PM
    #263
    mrjoshyman

    mrjoshyman Well-Known Member

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    Any idea if it's more or less the same on the 3rd gen Tacomas?
     
  4. Feb 25, 2019 at 9:41 AM
    #264
    eherlihy

    eherlihy Well-Known Member

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    Now that I've driven the beast a few hundred miles since the pad & rotor change I have an observation; I had a little shimmy in the front end while driving on the highway. It wasn't much, but I was thinking of scheduling an alignment. Since the pad & rotor swap there has been NO shimmy. Drives as smooth as silk on the highway or around town. I now attribute the shimmy to rotor warp.

    Adding another observation; when I did the pads I did not flush the fluid because I just had a new frame installed 9 months ago. After doing the pads, and compressing the pistons, the brake fluid looks like strong tea! Somehow the techs seem to have swapped the frame WITHOUT flushing the fluid!!:annoyed:
    :ohsnap:
    Now I will have to flush the fluid... :annoyed:
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
  5. Feb 26, 2019 at 4:22 AM
    #265
    nivek5sfe

    nivek5sfe Well-Known Member

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    How did they manage that? They put all new lines from the ABS to the wheels on mine so Im sure they had to replace the fluid. I know brake fluid was listed on the frame replacement invoice also. Im about to do my front brakes and didnt plan on flushing/bleeding since i just had the frame replaced 2 months ago.
     
  6. Feb 26, 2019 at 5:31 AM
    #266
    eherlihy

    eherlihy Well-Known Member

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    It would appear that the front lines were disconnected and reconnected as part of the frame replacement procedure. They were neither flushed nor bled. When I compressed the pistons to replace the pads, old brake fluid was pushed back from the cylinders into the system. That's why the fluid in the reservoir suddenly changed from "clear" to "strong tea" in color. When I bled the brakes, starting at the right rear, I bled a mix of old contaminated and new fluid. When I bled the right front caliper I got A LOT of air out. I strongly suspect that they reassembled the truck, bled the REAR brakes, topped up the reservoir, and called it a day.

    After the frame was swapped, I had to zip-tie the wiring harness and brake lines back onto the frame because they cut EVERY ONE of the wiring and brake line supports. I had to replace all of the bleeder screw caps because they removed and did not replace any of them, and I replaced the front axle dust caps because they dented the shit out of them.

    Because the work was done by "professionals," it does not mean that it was done right.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
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  7. Feb 26, 2019 at 10:18 AM
    #267
    eherlihy

    eherlihy Well-Known Member

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    After a trip to 4 auto parts stores, and the local Toyota dealer I have come to the conclusion that NO RETAILERS IN FT. MYERS FL have M7x1.0 bleeder screw with a 10MM head in stock! The dealer wanted $15 and change for ONE. I ordered four steel bleeders (Rear SB 1010 and Front SB 7100 - with cap) from SpeedBleeder.com for $28+ shipping.
     
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  8. Feb 26, 2019 at 11:04 AM
    #268
    Norton

    Norton Senior Member

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  9. Feb 26, 2019 at 11:24 AM
    #269
    eherlihy

    eherlihy Well-Known Member

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    Yep... for ½ the price that the local dealer is askin' for OEM bleed screws it was a no-brainer.
     
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  10. Mar 2, 2019 at 12:23 AM
    #270
    tmr

    tmr Well-Known Member

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    Followed this guide and swapped out from front brake pads tonight, first time doing the brakes on my Tacoma since I have owned it. May have waited a little long and as mentioned it in the video the bottom guide pins on both sides were pretty tough to get out. Stupid me, I ordered the Carlson Guide Pins on Amazon and didn't read the fine print so by ordering 1 set only two pins showed up. I elected to throw the new pins in the bottoms on both side and picked the best two old pins for the tops.

    Thanks again LoadedTaco, you saved me a bunch of time and money!
     
  11. Mar 15, 2019 at 8:47 PM
    #271
    mbrogz3000

    mbrogz3000 Well-Known Member

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    If you can get at least 80k miles out of the first set of brakes, I recommend also rebuilding the brake caliper seals with the $20 OEM rebuild kit (Toyota part number 04478 04050 for Tacoma 4x4 V6 models) to avoid developing sticky/slow pistons. Which also means flushing the front fluid lines (ideally you would do all 4 corners anyway after 80k anyway). Typical symptoms that develops a few months after that first-brake job is the front end will shake and wobble during light braking, and sometimes cause the steering wheel to shake when braking at highway speeds. During firm/hard braking (which we only get to do 5% of the time), there is no wobble/shake since there is more fluid pressure pushing the piston out and evenly apply force against the pads. I had the inner pads wearing faster than the outer pads, and I had uneven wear on the inner pads (so the pad material was slightly unlevel). The sticky pistons are a bitch to get out but they will come out - the ones that are slow to come out are likely the sticky ones. There was a lot of particle and crap gathering behind the pistons, with fluid (Motul RBF 600 - this is overkill for this truck - switching to Prestone Dot 4, which is very very good $4 fluid) that was only 20 months old which by the way became black behind the pistons. After cleaning, all 8 of my pistons were flawless, absolutely no pitting - at most I had a few teeny-tiny surface scratches which could not be felt with fingernails, so I think were acceptable to reuse. Before you run out and spend $200+ (and needing to return your original caliper) on 'reman' calipers, try cleaning and rebuilding the calipers during the regular brake service. These are high end, heavy duty calipers, so they need a bit more service to avoid braking issues. Just some additional comments below:

    1. 'Screwdriver method' of prying the pistons back into the caliper is a major contributor to sticky pistons- it’s an unacceptable method and it promotes the piston becoming angled-in against the square-seal. Make sure to invest in the pad-spreader tool to keep the pistons perpendicular while evenly pushing them into the caliper, if you aren’t going to rebuild them. The tool can even be used to block off the pistons when popping them out with compressed air if you do rebuild them.

    2. During vacuum bleeding, only some particles but not all particles stored behind the pistons will come out and get 'flushed'. Lots of garbage particles will still remain in the caliper, and due to the single fluid passageway in the caliper (there is only one port to get fluid to the outer 2 piston wells), will never come out unless the pistons are removed. These particles keep gathering and gathering and eventually work their way into the squareseal/piston interface - contributing sticky pistons. I think the particle material even gets under the seal groove, which causes the seal to compress harder than intended around the piston.

    3. Toyota/Lexus 4x4 trucks have 8 total brake pistons, not 2 or 4! - forget about “seized” pistons. It’s probably not going to happen unless you are constantly fording water. All it takes is 1 “sticky” piston to make braking miserable with the above symptoms.

    4. The longer the use your pads, the further out the boot is extended and which makes it more likely to take-on moisture and water, as well as having more surface area exposed for dry rotting. And the further the piston will need pressed back in anyway. You are better off just replacing the pads as soon as the pad dust groove is worn away. Don’t take them all the way down to 1/16” the way I did!
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019 at 9:19 AM
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