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Is this a simple question ?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by StinkyTaco, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. Dec 19, 2007 at 8:26 PM
    #1
    StinkyTaco

    StinkyTaco [OP] Member

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    On the 2008 2 wheel drive with the locking diff. it says not to drivre over 5 MPH. Why can't you just peddle it through the gear box ?
     
  2. Dec 19, 2007 at 10:29 PM
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    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    I'm confused also....

    When you have 4WD and are in 4lo range - they tell you not to drive more than 5mph (or something like that).

    But in 2WD? Baaahumbug!
     
  3. Dec 20, 2007 at 10:36 AM
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    nd

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    i could be wrong, but i think it is because cornering or turning at high speeds can be dangerous with the back locked. The binding can cause the truck to flip easier. not sure if this is the reason but it made sense when it was explained to me
     
  4. Dec 20, 2007 at 10:51 AM
    #4
    gdawg25

    gdawg25 Zoom-Zoom

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    Also, cornering with the locker on can cause damage to the diff. While cornering the tires rotate at different speeds - the outside tire rotates faster. So when you lock the diff, your tires are unable to rotate at different speeds. That's why you shouldn't go more than 5mph with the diff locked.
     
  5. Dec 20, 2007 at 10:56 AM
    #5
    GTiVR6r

    GTiVR6r Big Cat Chew Toy

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    Then why doesn't Toyota build a failsafe circuit into the locking diff system to dis-engage at speeds over 6 MPH??? :rolleyes:

    If a Toyota car's rear defoster turns off automagically after 10 minutes, then the electronic diff should dis-engage when speeds reach 6 MPH. :cool:
     
  6. Dec 20, 2007 at 12:25 PM
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    Janster

    Janster Old & Forgetful

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    I understand the binding aspect of it....

    The fact the 2WD guys can engage the locker anytime and the 4WD guys can't - is the confusing part to me. I mean - I can't imagine what they were thinking. Is there really any difference ?
     
  7. Dec 20, 2007 at 5:43 PM
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    nd

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    that i'm not sure about. that confuses me too. i dont know why it would be ok for a 2wd to engage the locker, but a 4x4 in 2wd cant. No idea what toyota was thinking when they decided that made sense.... You're one of our resident wheelers, with all the answers, i'm actually surprised you dont know ;)
     
  8. Dec 20, 2007 at 7:39 PM
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    tacomaman06

    tacomaman06 Carolina Alliance: Lead, follow, or get the hell o Staff Member

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    drive with the diff locked as fast as you want to, nothing bad will happen. just dont run it locked on pavement, as that is where there would be too much strain on it and something may break, or you could wreck. i've had my diff locked and ran it up around 40-45 mph on dirt/grass and it was fine......kinda fun actually.

    toyota only says dont run it over 5 mph while its locked for liability reasons....basically to save their own ass.
     
  9. Dec 20, 2007 at 8:05 PM
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    StinkyTaco

    StinkyTaco [OP] Member

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    thats what i thought, thanks
     
  10. Dec 21, 2007 at 3:24 AM
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    ERdept

    ERdept Well-Known Member

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    OK, but I have friends who are into drag racing. They've got built hot rodded but streetable Camaro's and Roadrunners.

    They install Posi to prevent it from "peg legging", where only one wheel turns, and the other is left to slip.

    They want both wheels to turn. They're exclusively on the street. So, how come they/their cars can do it.

    I see them go around corners and all I see is chirping. Not arguing here, just trying to get to the bottom of this.
     
  11. Dec 21, 2007 at 6:58 AM
    #11
    tacomaman06

    tacomaman06 Carolina Alliance: Lead, follow, or get the hell o Staff Member

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    the only thing i can really say here is dirt and grass give alot more that pavement or asphalt does. plus it may be a big variance with their tires.....all terrrain tires on a truck are way different that slicks or street tires on a car set up for racing.
     
  12. Dec 21, 2007 at 9:47 AM
    #12
    mjp2

    mjp2 Living vicariously though myself Staff Member

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    Posi != locker. A posi is a limited slip, which means there are friction plates/springs/stuff to encourage both wheels to turn at the same rate, but as the axle shafts on either side of the differential are not mechanically bound to one another they do have the ability to turn at different rates.

    I believe the 2wd Tacomas have a limited slip rear, not a locker.

    The TRD offroad package comes with the electronic locker which can be turned on and off. Off = open differential. On = true locked differential, which functions the same as a spool. (spools have no spider gears -- the ring gear drives a simple shaft into which the two axles shafts are inserted. Virtually unbreakable offroad, but terrible on dry pavement.

    Standard lockers (Detroit, for instance) try to balance offroad and onroad performance by locking and unlocking based on the forces exerting the most leverage on the differential. If the driveline is applying power (acceleration), the locker engages and the differential locks solid. If the ground is applying power (coasting), the teeth disengage and the differential opens. The trick with this is to know how and when things will lock up and anticipate it or your vehicle will do some weird things. Basically, let off the gas around turns and apply power once you're straight and things will be fine.

    As far as asking Toyota to automatically disengage the locker above 5mph, bite your tongue! It's bad enough I have to hack the wiring to get it to engage in 4wd-hi and 2wd. :cool:
     
  13. Dec 21, 2007 at 1:09 PM
    #13
    piercedtiger

    piercedtiger Devout Atheist

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    Thanks for explaining Posi! I always thought it was the same as a locked axle.

    I'm with Tacomaman. Trucks and cars have had lockers for years, but mostly for racers or offroaders who KNOW what to expect. Put one in a truck that any schmuck can buy without knowing how it works could spell trouble. Toyota doesn't want to get sued cuz some idiot locked up and power slid around a corner into a bus load of kids. Even Detroit lockers could do that from what I understand. Heard some guy talking about how he'd get on the gas going around a corner. The locker would engage with a BANG, scare the crap out of the people on the sidewalks, and light up the tires! :laugh:

    And I second the comment to bite your tongue about Toyota auto-disabling it above 6mph!! I've used mine at 35-45mph on snowy roads to help hold the truck straight. It would fishtail slightly in 4wd cuz my tires suck and one would spin. With the locker on at least both tires spun equally fast and the truck didn't try to break loose. There was lots of snow/slush on the roads so binding wasn't a problem. If toyota interfered then I'd have to disable yet another nanny system to do that.
     
  14. Dec 21, 2007 at 1:09 PM
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    StinkyTaco

    StinkyTaco [OP] Member

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    some of my buddies that have full blown locker rear ends on their pre runners,
    drive the shit out of em' on all types of road surfaces.
    On tighter turns the tires chirps.

    ????????
     
  15. Dec 21, 2007 at 1:47 PM
    #15
    LRH

    LRH Well-Known Member

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    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    These are still not (most likely) spools, but gear or clutch types that are not totally street friendly, but do allow some varying speeds between the L and R axles.
     
  16. Dec 21, 2007 at 2:08 PM
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    mjp2

    mjp2 Living vicariously though myself Staff Member

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    It they're running spools then they most likely beefed up the rest of the rear to handle the stress. With a spool, factory axle shafts will tend to load like a torsion bar when turning. When they unload (untwist) you'll hear the tires chirp. Thicker, stronger axle shafts will resist loading and will tend to squeal around turns more than chirp. They'll also last a whole lot longer.

    Anything can be made to survive if it's beefed up enough. :cool:

    If they're running an automatic locker (Detroit, for instance), the rest of the rear end will be more likely to hold together without needing excessive building. They'll also tend to chirp more than squeal as the locker engages and disengages.
     
  17. Dec 21, 2007 at 3:08 PM
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    tacomaman06

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    awesome explanation mjp!!!!
     
  18. Dec 24, 2007 at 7:05 AM
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    mjp2

    mjp2 Living vicariously though myself Staff Member

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    Thanks! Usually I'm good for little more than a snarky comment around here, but every now and then a topic comes up that I actually understand. ;)
     
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