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Light bar with existing Fog/driving light switch and High beams

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by yzguyfl, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. Feb 18, 2019 at 8:55 PM
    #1
    yzguyfl

    yzguyfl [OP] Member

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    I wanted to run my light bar on my 2014 Tacoma using the factory driving (fog) light switch in combination with the high beams (Most instructions I have seen use an add on switch). So basically, with the light switch on and low beams on, the fog/driving lights will be on, and when you switch to high beams, those will shut off, and the light bar will come on. If you turn off the factory switch, then neither the light bar, or the fog/driving lights will be on no matter what. You can also combine this with the anytime fog lights mod (which would just make high beams use fog lights and light bar)

    1a.jpg

    What I did was use the dash switch output (- trigger) to activate both the stock fog light relay, and a new stock like relay in an empty spot in the housing. The fog light relay has the + side triggered by the low beams (the way the stock system is wired) and the new relay will have the + side of the relay trigged by the high beams. This does require 2 diodes to keep the relays from back feeding into each other and unintentionally triggering the relays.


    Pic1:
    Pull the cover off the fuse/relay box: pull tab with your finger
    1.jpg

    2.jpg

    3.jpg

    4.jpg

    5.jpg

    6.jpg

    7.jpg

    Pic 8
    Jumper I made with 1 male end, 2 female connectors, and 2 (1A) diodes (stripe on the diode on the male connector side). The male connector was a standard blade terminal that I sanded down to be the correct width. The female ones I actually had in my pile of connectors, not sure exactly where you would find these, they are a little smaller than the standard blade terminal connectors we normally see (the larger connectors on the relay are the standard ones)
    8.jpg

    Pic 9
    I did not take a before picture, but the blue wire (1) was originally in the socket 2. I used a small screwdriver to release the catch and push the connector out the bottom (after pulling the relay out), then connected the factory female connector to my male jumper, then put heat shrink over the connection. The other female end of the jumper, pushes into #5 (neg trigger of new light bar relay). #6 wire (also a small female connector) will go to the high beam + and is the + trigger for the light bar relay. #3 & #4 are constant (fused) power, and output + to the light bar (does not matter which is which).

    Push in the relays from the top BEFORE snapping on the bottom cover. This is to make sure you don’t push out any of the non stock pins we put in. Sometimes they take a push from the bottom with a small screwdriver to make sure they push onto the relays. Then tuck in all the wires, and snap the bottom cover on the relay box.

    Now slide the relay box back onto the larger box.
    9.jpg

    Pic 10
    I ran the power wire to the constant + post and just an inline fuse holder.
    10.jpg

    11.jpg

    Pic 12
    Adapter I got to tap into the high beam + signal. These have a ceramic end, designed for hot lights, but really I just wanted a male and female pig tail. I tapped into the red wire to run to the light bar relay +. Then you just unplug your drivers side headlight and put this jumper in between the stock plug and your headlight (no messing with the stock wires)
    12.jpg

    Pic 13
    Almost finished, just need to add the wire looming to the new wires, but other than that, all done and looks pretty good (no extra haning relays, and no extra switches)
    13.jpg
    14.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2019
    whatstcp likes this.
  2. Feb 18, 2019 at 9:05 PM
    #2
    whatstcp

    whatstcp Professional incoherent spammer

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    Fontana, CA
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    King + Archive Relocation Wheeler's bumps +hydros
    ouuu very nice, exactly which diode did you use if you don't mind me asking. Been needing a diode and am unsure of which to buy.
     
  3. Feb 18, 2019 at 9:29 PM
    #3
    yzguyfl

    yzguyfl [OP] Member

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    it is not terribly important. I happen to use 1A version because I have a stack of them laying around. They are like the smallest ones in this variety pack:
    https://www.amazon.com/Pack-Assortm...UTF8&qid=1550553952&sr=8-5&keywords=diode+12v

    if I had larger ones laying around, I probably would have used them, slightly easier to solder to, and a little less fragile (not that there is anything even close to an amp needed to flow through it).

    Any in that pack would work fine. (or pretty much anything labeled as 1A or more, and I only say 1A because of size, smaller ones get really delicate ).
     

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