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noobie question about 2 ohm sub to 4 ohm amp

Discussion in 'Audio & Video' started by wigwamdj, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. Mar 12, 2008 at 12:53 AM
    #1
    wigwamdj

    wigwamdj [OP] Member

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    for a taco

    1. is a dual 10" 2 ohm sub wired to a 4 ohm amp good in the long run?
    ive been researching and came across this website http://pinq.wordpress.com/2007/05/11...le-voice-coil/
    which has helped a lot

    2. which dual 10" sub and amp should i go for? suggestions? long run?
    i mainly listen to hiphop/rap 70%
    to rock 30%

    3. if i were to use dual 10" subs 2 ohm wired to a 4 ohm amp, which is better in the long run? series or parallel?

    4. or should i just scrap it and get a single 12" sub?

    so basically im looking for dual subs and amps that would be good together in the long run.

    ps. sorry for being a noob but it happens. thanks guys
     
  2. Mar 12, 2008 at 6:16 AM
    #2
    My68ur8trd

    My68ur8trd Well-Known Member Vendor

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    Justin
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    two 2ohm SVC (single voice coil) subs,

    wired in series gives you a 4 ohm load on the amp.

    If the amp is rated at 4 ohm bridged (2 channel) or a 4 ohm mono amp, your fine.

    Most 2 channels are 2 ohm stable in stereo ( channel to each sub)

    Some mono amps are 1 ohm stable and you could wire the subs in parallel to get a 1 ohm load on the amp for max power

    Essentually, you want to match you rms output of your amp to the rms rating for you sub.

    If it were me, I would wire them in series and run it a 4 ohms

    Justin
     
  3. Mar 12, 2008 at 2:01 PM
    #3
    wigwamdj

    wigwamdj [OP] Member

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    sweet thanks.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2008 at 2:31 AM
    #4
    wigwamdj

    wigwamdj [OP] Member

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    if im correct running these series would give me max power?
     
  5. Mar 13, 2008 at 2:26 PM
    #5
    sooner07

    sooner07 1/2 man 1/2 amazing

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    Always working on the stereo, painted the front skid plate black to match the truck, debadged , toy tech ultimate lift kit, light racing UCAs, ARB bumper Looking into a supercharger and new exhaust.
    I am dumbing this down a bit and removing some physics lingo.

    Paralleling with cause the amp to work harder and put out more wattage (as long as it is stable at that load).

    Wiring in series will decrease the load and cause an amp to put out less wattage.

    It may seem backwards, but a 2 ohm load is harder on an amplifier than a 4 ohm load. It will cause it to put out twice the wattage (all other things equal.

    Also, it is better for all equipment involved if your amplifier is rated at a higher wattage than the subs RMS rating. This is due to signal distortion at high levels of output. I can explain more if you are interested.
     
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