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Oil filter drain?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by mugu07taco, Aug 21, 2007.

  1. Aug 21, 2007 at 10:12 PM
    #1
    mugu07taco

    mugu07taco [OP] Member

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    I read a thread saying their is a quick drain for the oil filter. I just did my first oil change and made a mess and I looked around and could not find such a drain.

    Pics and info would be great.

    Thanks, Dave
     
  2. Aug 22, 2007 at 4:25 AM
    #2
    isusww

    isusww Well-Known Member

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    As a side note, I let my oil drain for about 10 minutes and unscrew the filter about 5 turns. Doing this has allowed the filter to completely drain with no mess. Maybe it will work as well for you.
     
  3. Aug 22, 2007 at 8:25 AM
    #3
    mugu07taco

    mugu07taco [OP] Member

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    Thanks isusww, what year do you have? I will give it a shot next time.

    Any other suggestions are still welcome, like this plug I read about would be nice.

    Thanks,
    Dave
     
  4. Aug 22, 2007 at 11:08 AM
    #4
    106Tacoma

    106Tacoma Well-Known Member

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    My tacoma has a little rubber nipple where the filter screws on, take it off attach a rubber hose and when you take the filter off the oil drains into the catch and through the hose into my oil catch pan. Easy as pie!
     
  5. Aug 22, 2007 at 11:27 AM
    #5
    pb2themax

    pb2themax Mod Master

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    That catch funnel below the filter has a nipple in the bottom. Pull it off and put a bottle underneath.

    I would just let the engine sit for a few hours and the filter shouldn't have much oil in it. I use Mobil 1 filter M1-209 and it doesn't drain any oil when I do an oil change. I don't get a drop of oil on my hands during an oil change.
     
  6. Aug 22, 2007 at 11:32 AM
    #6
    maverick491

    maverick491 Towing Guru

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    pb,

    I guess since you use the mobil one filters that you are happy with them. Do you have any other reasons besides the anti-drainback thing for choosing them over say the tough guard Frams, or K&N oil filters?

    I have always used Fram Tough Guard filters in the past, but have not had to change the oil in my new truck yet so I wanted to get some input.
     
  7. Aug 22, 2007 at 12:07 PM
    #7
    106Tacoma

    106Tacoma Well-Known Member

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    Oem toyota or pure one filters i think are the best. Fram ive seen come apart and detroy and engine. My opinion.
     
  8. Aug 22, 2007 at 12:28 PM
    #8
    nd

    nd Radical Town. It's a hell of a place!

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    I know i will catch crap for this from the serious mechanic's but here goes...
    IMO an oil filter is a oil filter. Fram wouldn't still be around if they destroyed engines. I used Fram on my beamer every oil change and she had well over 200k on her and was still running as strong as the day she rolled off the line. She'd still be running if my brother hadn't wrecked her. anyway, the engine was immaculate and i always got comments from the guys at the shop saying they almost never work on an engine in that good of shape with those miles. so in my opinion, there is nothing wrong with Fram.

    Now if i'm wrong and someone can prove it im all ears. i'm not stubborn i just dont see the evidence.
     
  9. Aug 23, 2007 at 3:25 AM
    #9
    pb2themax

    pb2themax Mod Master

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    From what I've researched, the Fram Tough Guard are pretty good filters. The older Fram's are not so good.

    My top 3 filters would be Amsoil EA, Mobil 1, and Wix. They use a better filtering media that allows more oil flow.
     
  10. Aug 23, 2007 at 7:54 AM
    #10
    nd

    nd Radical Town. It's a hell of a place!

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    Since it's a brand new truck and i have alot of money invested in it as opposed to the Beamer, i will probably use higher end filters just to be on teh safe side. I just wanted to say that i dont believe there is anything wrong with Fram.
     
  11. Aug 23, 2007 at 12:11 PM
    #11
    isusww

    isusww Well-Known Member

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    Its an '05. Like PB said, if you let it sit for a while, the oil will drain out of the filter anyhow. If you can change your oil first thing in the morning before a start up, you'll get best results. Sat./Sun. mornings are when I do mine. Plus, you don't have to worry about burning yourself on anything :D
     
  12. Aug 23, 2007 at 12:36 PM
    #12
    TRDeity

    TRDeity Well-Known Member

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    Nothing wrong with Fram, I've used them on every oil change in my mustang.
     
  13. Aug 24, 2007 at 5:16 AM
    #13
    Viper-2

    Viper-2 Secret Agent

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    Yeah Fram really gets a bad rap everywhere you look. Seems the tests out there of oil filters aren't so good for Frams.
     
  14. Aug 24, 2007 at 9:19 PM
    #14
    tacopuppy

    tacopuppy Well-Known Member

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    you should always change oil with a hot engine. Not a cold engine.
     
  15. Aug 27, 2007 at 7:23 AM
    #15
    nd

    nd Radical Town. It's a hell of a place!

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    why is that?
     
  16. Aug 27, 2007 at 7:49 AM
    #16
    maverick491

    maverick491 Towing Guru

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    To get the oil warmed up and flowing easier so that you achieve a more complete draining. This is how I was taught to change oil by my father in the late 70's and early 80's. I suspect that it was more important then when most cars used thicker oils back then. I dunno if it is as important now with the lighter weight oils coming in newer cars and with synthetic and synthetic blends and such. I just do it because of old habits and such. Perhaps someone else can chime in on if it is still necessary.
     
  17. Aug 27, 2007 at 8:46 AM
    #17
    nd

    nd Radical Town. It's a hell of a place!

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    I assumed it had to do with more oil draining when its warm but come on... it's oil not molasses. It's slick enough and thin enough to drain completely, even when it is cold, you just have to give it plenty of time and gravity will take care of the rest. I was in a hurry one day and changed the oil in the beamer after i had been driving it and burned the hell out of my arm. I changed the oil cold ever since then. The beamer had an incredibly awkward oil filter placement. it was very common for me to have oil drain all the way down my arm before i could dislodge my hand with the filter.
     
  18. Aug 27, 2007 at 5:29 PM
    #18
    LQQKatmy06

    LQQKatmy06 Carolina Alliance

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    T-VILLE, NC
    06 SR5 V6 DC LB TRD Sport 4x4 AUTO. 3" TOYTEC 885 coils w/AALs, ALL-PRO UCAs, 285/70/17 NITTOs, KMC HOSS in BLACK
    I took the cap off and leave a hose on there all the time, its ran out the inner fender well trapped between the frame and rubber flap. If any water collets in there from hosing off my motor it can run out, and then push my drain pan that way when my filter is removed.
     
  19. Aug 27, 2007 at 10:50 PM
    #19
    tacopuppy

    tacopuppy Well-Known Member

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    oil, from the 70's 80's or today are more viscous at ambient than operating temp. draining oil closer to operating temp will assist with getting most of the old fluid out of nooks and crannies, so to speak, a bit better. this method combined with gravity and time you can't go wrong.
     
  20. Aug 29, 2007 at 9:26 AM
    #20
    mugu07taco

    mugu07taco [OP] Member

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    Very nice discussions
     
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