1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Overheating Question

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by iJDub, Jun 1, 2021.

  1. Jun 1, 2021 at 6:50 PM
    #1
    iJDub

    iJDub [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    Member:
    #48225
    Messages:
    1,081
    Gender:
    Male
    I was towing about 5000 lbs of rock in a trailer today. I was stopped on a hill (uphill) and had the car in drive, but my foot on the brakes. I noticed my temp gauge went up from the normal half way mark to about 3/4 way to max temp. I shifted the transmission to neutral and the temps dropped after a minute or so.

    1) Why would the water temp shoot up in drive vs neutral if I was stopped?

    2) Could there be any damage to the engine if it was 3/4 for about 3-5 minutes?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jun 1, 2021 at 6:53 PM
    #2
    tirediron

    tirediron Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2019
    Member:
    #279864
    Messages:
    2,441
    First Name:
    John
    Vehicle:
    2018 4x4 Sport, Auto, BBP
    No damage to the engine!

    In drive the engine is trying to overcome the static friction of the torque converter, but has less air-flow because you're stopped. In neutral it's spinning freely.
     
    TnShooter likes this.
  3. Jun 1, 2021 at 6:54 PM
    #3
    TnShooter

    TnShooter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Member:
    #42625
    Messages:
    7,166
    Gender:
    Male
    Vehicle:
    07' TRD Off-Road, Auto
    STOCK
    Where you still on the hill when the temps dropped?

    My truck idles higher in P and N.
    But not much more. Not enough to blow that much more air across the engine, but maybe.

    Have you checked the fluid level in the radiator?
     
  4. Jun 1, 2021 at 6:58 PM
    #4
    iJDub

    iJDub [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    Member:
    #48225
    Messages:
    1,081
    Gender:
    Male
    I was still on the hill when the temps dropped. Fluid level normal. It was a hot day (about 100 degrees) - hopefully everything's fine.
     
    TnShooter likes this.
  5. Jun 1, 2021 at 7:19 PM
    #5
    Waasheem

    Waasheem The catholic radio bear

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2019
    Member:
    #297494
    Messages:
    1,403
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Waasheem
    Vehicle:
    2007 xrunner
    I’m in agreement with no damage done. You gave the cooling system and transmission a good work out. If the temperature needle was buried in full hot and you floored it the rest of the way up the hill, that can possibly cause damage.

    If you haul that much weight in hot air regularly, you might consider adding a transmission cooler. Even if yours has a towing package, it could extend the life of your transmission. I put one in a different vehicle that had a thermostat controlled fan, worked good, it was a b&m.
     
  6. Jun 1, 2021 at 7:28 PM
    #6
    iJDub

    iJDub [OP] Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    Member:
    #48225
    Messages:
    1,081
    Gender:
    Male
    This was a one time thing - just to remove the gravel from my back yard. Thanks for the input guys!
     
  7. Jun 1, 2021 at 7:31 PM
    #7
    12TRDTacoma

    12TRDTacoma Powered by Ford, GM, VW, and Mercedes

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2012
    Member:
    #85133
    Messages:
    15,186
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Rob
    Concordia
    Vehicle:
    12 TRD Sport DCLB 4x4 Supercharged
    Boosted
    See, that could potentially be a problem because the temp gauge needle on these trucks are designed to go to to half and stay that way until you have overheated it. If you see anything above half there is a good chance you were already at 230+ degree territory. Maybe even 250-260+ degrees.

    Do yourself a favor and when you tow, leave it in 4 when going up hills, this is especially true when in steep terrain for extended periods of time. A real temperature gauge (and not just going off the OE dummy gauge) may be a good thing to look into as well. Especially if you tow often.

    AEM makes a direct plug in X series gauge (it should be PN: 30-0300) to the OBD2 plug which reads the temp output directly from the PCM. This way you have absolute direct information of your coolant temperature at all times.
     

Products Discussed in

To Top