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Polish Compound vs Rubbing Compound

Discussion in 'Detailing' started by demesauce, Jun 7, 2011.

  1. Jun 7, 2011 at 2:53 PM
    #1
    demesauce

    demesauce [OP] Well-Known Member

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    So, what is the difference? I need to remove some scratches, deep scratches and over spray. What should I use? Thanks in advance
     
  2. Jun 7, 2011 at 3:18 PM
    #2
    Chris(NJ)

    Chris(NJ) Well-Known Member

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    For overspray, you're better off using clay. A mild clay is typically enough, however, for more severe stuff, a heavy cut clay might be needed.

    If the scratches are real deep, you can forget polishing them out. Fingernail test.... if you can feel the scratch w/ your nail, you're not gonna simply polish it out.

    I really like meguiars 105 ultra cut compound. You can use it by hand to do spot correction, or by machine for overall defect removal. It finishes sooo nicely and is not as temperamental as some other boutique compound/polishes. It may still be required that you follow up w/ a lighter finishing polish though.

    Give some more info on what you're exactly looking to do. A small section? Whole panel? Entire truck?
     
  3. Jun 7, 2011 at 3:20 PM
    #3
    RoyR

    RoyR Well-Known Member

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    The one you have clear-coat left, the other you don't...:)
     
  4. Jun 8, 2011 at 5:55 AM
    #4
    Gooch

    Gooch Well-Known Member

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    Well said.

    Rubbing compound (aka 'rocks in a bottle') should be banned.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2011 at 11:19 AM
    #5
    demesauce

    demesauce [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Cool, thanks guys
     
  6. Jun 11, 2011 at 6:22 AM
    #6
    Rocketball

    Rocketball If The World Didn't Suck, We'd All Fall Off

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    To answer your first question.....

    Rubbing compound has abrasives in it. Most polishing compounds do not contain abrasives.
     
  7. Jun 11, 2011 at 9:06 AM
    #7
    Gooch

    Gooch Well-Known Member

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    ^That is not true. Virtually all polishes have abrasives in it...that's what makes it 'polish'.

    However, the abrasive particles (like aluminum oxide) are usually near microscopic, so even when you rub it with your fingers, you can't feel the abrasives. Rubbing compound has particles that are huge, which is why you can feel them so easily and why it's called 'rocks in a bottle'.

    Its all about particle size.

    Some companies call their products 'polishes' when they are more like waxes or sealants. Duragloss sells a 'clearcoat polish' but it is non-abrasive (even the Geek states that on their product page).
     
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