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Reading the tea leaves

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by splash07s, Jan 19, 2021.

  1. Jan 19, 2021 at 12:08 AM
    #1
    splash07s

    splash07s [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Look into my mug and tell me what you see.....


    What do these spark plugs tell you?

    I changed them out for NGK LFR6C-11 @ 70K miles
    I can def tell a difference in the way it drives. Starts easier and does not hard shift going up a hill, just overall feels smoother.

    IMG_8248.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2021
  2. Jan 19, 2021 at 12:19 AM
    #2
    TnShooter

    TnShooter Well-Known Member

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    Tells me they probably have never been changed since there are 2 different types.

    Good work on the maintenance.
     
  3. Jan 19, 2021 at 3:20 AM
    #3
    CTSpruceMica

    CTSpruceMica Well-Known Member

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    Interesting that NGK electrodes appear more worn.
    Not that it matters, I run NGK in most of my stuff especially power equipment. I use the Densos in the Tacoma because that's what my dealer stocks and I'm pleased with their performance.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2021
  4. Jan 19, 2021 at 3:33 AM
    #4
    six5crèéd

    six5crèéd Back ordered

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    Other than seeing 7 from a 6 cylinder, I don’t see much.




    :D
     
  5. Jan 19, 2021 at 5:10 AM
    #5
    Gen2 Man

    Gen2 Man Well-Known Member

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    OEM came with two NGK and Denso. Now you can decide whether to go back with copper or iridium.
     
  6. Jan 19, 2021 at 6:29 AM
    #6
    EdgemanVA

    EdgemanVA Well-Known Member

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    I prefer sticking with conventional plugs, and changing them every 30K. Gives me a chance to check the engine's health. I also don't mind changing plugs every 3 years. Now if I was putting 30K+ miles on your truck every year, would definitely consider iridium plugs.
     
  7. Jan 19, 2021 at 6:41 AM
    #7
    ColoradoTJ

    ColoradoTJ Volunteer Moderator Moderator

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    I would change mine out every 30K as well per the owner's manual recommendation with Denso plugs. My trucks just ran better.
     
    cmoore, EdgemanVA and SR-71A like this.
  8. Jan 19, 2021 at 9:59 AM
    #8
    Gen2 Man

    Gen2 Man Well-Known Member

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    The advantage of 30k service? It gives you a chance to get in there and do a close visual inspection. You can spot things beginning to go wrong. Yes there have been testimonials about folks going way beyond what the manual says but other than being a tight ass what’s the advantage?
     
  9. Jan 19, 2021 at 11:23 AM
    #9
    splash07s

    splash07s [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I bought the truck with 35K on the clock and it was certified pre owned from a stealership who told me they did a complete service on it. I think the maint. log requires replacing the spark plugs every 30K so I would have assumed they were replaced when I bought it or soon before. I certainly have not driven it hard only putting another 35K miles on it in 5 years of ownership and never taking it offroad.
     
    mojojojo78 likes this.
  10. Jan 19, 2021 at 11:26 AM
    #10
    splash07s

    splash07s [OP] Well-Known Member

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    pretty sure the plugs I went back with are copper tip, I don't drive a ton so did not think I needed the extra cost of iridium.
     
  11. Jan 19, 2021 at 11:30 AM
    #11
    tirediron

    tirediron Well-Known Member

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    The threads, especially on the far right one, look quite oily to me...
     
  12. Jan 19, 2021 at 11:32 AM
    #12
    splash07s

    splash07s [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I noticed that as well, but since ive owned it I don't think its burned more than a half quart every 5k miles which seems normal to me.
     
  13. Jan 19, 2021 at 1:27 PM
    #13
    TnShooter

    TnShooter Well-Known Member

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    Yes, those plugs are Nickel Electrode Copper Core.
    The same as the OEM plugs.
    I personally haven’t used them.

    NGK typically makes a good plug. They are my preferred plug of choice in my 2-stroke equipment.

    Now, the question I like to ask.
    Did you actually torque the plugs to spec?
    Or did you do like most (me included) and go by feel.
     
    JaCado likes this.
  14. Jan 19, 2021 at 1:32 PM
    #14
    splash07s

    splash07s [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I am one of those really OCD people who has to do things the right way or its not worth doing at all, so yes, I did used a torque wrench. Besides, if you don't already have one (or four) then its a good excuse to buy one.
     
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  15. Jan 19, 2021 at 1:37 PM
    #15
    TnShooter

    TnShooter Well-Known Member

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    I have 4 maybe 5?

    1x 1/4”
    1x 3/8”
    2x 1/2”

    1x 3/4” I think? Bought it to do axle nut.
    But later got another 1/2 that goes to 250 lbs.

    Nothing wrong doing it the right way.
    You should do it that way.
    I just get nervous on low TQ stuff. Always test the wrench before using it.
    There’s been times the wrench has “lied” on low TQ stuff.
    I hate to strip a cylinder head, that would SUCK.
    So I go by feel.
     
    JaCado likes this.
  16. Jan 19, 2021 at 2:20 PM
    #16
    JustAddMud

    JustAddMud Professional Grease Monkey

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    I don't really trust the upper 10% or the lower 10% of a torque wrench. The internal spring is either fully compressed or fully relaxed. I try to find a different torque wrench where the value will fall more in the middle. Sometimes that's converting inLb to ftLb or vise versa. So no, you can never have enough torque wrenches and yes, try to verify calibration on a bench prior to use using a known weight if you don't have one of those meters.

    -J
     
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  17. Jan 19, 2021 at 2:28 PM
    #17
    TnShooter

    TnShooter Well-Known Member

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    I do this at times.
    I use my in/lbs wrench for lower ft/lbs stuff.

    SnapOn says their error margin is between 20%-100%.

    They even say this-

    “Use Caution When Buying Torque Wrenches Rated Below 20% of Full Scale.
    Torque wrenches that are scaled below 20% of full scale may not be accurate and may lead users to operate them below their useful range. Select a torque wrench so your working range falls near the mid point of its capacity.”

    I’ve ways tried to shoot for 40%-90% range.
     
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  18. Jan 19, 2021 at 2:41 PM
    #18
    tahoeskitaco

    tahoeskitaco Well-Known Member

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    I just changed my 2002 2.7L plugs to NGK iridium's. I used my inch pound torque wrench due to concerns noted. I change them every 60k.
     
  19. Jan 19, 2021 at 2:43 PM
    #19
    JustAddMud

    JustAddMud Professional Grease Monkey

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    Our work has annual requirements to get all of our torque wrenches calibrated but they do get used and abused more than my personal wrenches at home. We also run off the upper/lower 10% rule because of this annual inspection requirement so of course, your mileage may vary. My home wrenches, I still follow the 10% rule but when it comes to your safety, always err on the side of caution.

    -J

    Edit: And always store your torque wrenches at the lowest value. Keep that spring relaxed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2021
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  20. Jan 19, 2021 at 2:45 PM
    #20
    JustAddMud

    JustAddMud Professional Grease Monkey

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    To note, if you used any anti-seize compound on your plugs, to lower the torque by 10-15% since the anti-seize acts as a lubricant and may effectively over-torque your plugs. Any time I add any sort of lubricant to anything I am torqueing, I always reduce the required torque by 10%.

    -J
     

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