1. Welcome to Tacoma World!

    You are currently viewing as a guest! To get full-access, you need to register for a FREE account.

    As a registered member, you’ll be able to:
    • Participate in all Tacoma discussion topics
    • Communicate privately with other Tacoma owners from around the world
    • Post your own photos in our Members Gallery
    • Access all special features of the site

Recovery Q&A and help.

Discussion in 'Recovery' started by 3378jakesr5, Jan 5, 2017.

  1. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:38 AM
    #1
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    Thread updated 1/5/17.

    Lets put all of our recovery questions, discussions, and techniques, all into one spot so that we can look back at this for years to come..

    the first few posts will be updated with all the USEFUL info so that it can be quickly found

    This is a collection of information from members of tacoma world and other forums, i do not take any credit for this in a whole, I am just putting all the information i can in one place for everyone to find easily.

    Other helpful Tacoma world threads


    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/going-alone-single-vehicle-wheeling-safety.454083/
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  2. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:38 AM
    #2
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    Q&A

    When a question is posted onto here it will be added to this post. If you have an answer for that question please quote that question and tag @3378jakesr5 in the post so i can move it to this post.



    Q.
    How do you use a high lift as a winch??
    Proper technique?
    A.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xldBPnzohtI



     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  3. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:38 AM
    #3
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    When and how to use your recovery gear

    Winching

    winching instructions from warn industries

    https://www.warn.com/corporate/assets/pdf/75013-A2_read.pdf


    Winch ratings are determined at the first layer of cable/rope. As layers are added, the rating goes down. So, you have to pull out all the rope to the first layer to execute the full rating of the winch... which usually translates to pull out as much line as you can for a particular pull to reduce damaging your winch.


    Another misnomer folks have when they purchase a winch is the size. They assume they only need rated to their vehicle curb weight. They don't consider the friction factor of mud, snow, sand, water and gravitational effects of pulling out of hole. It is much more than just pulling on flat dry land of non-stuck vehicle. In addition, the winch is the only accessory on my truck that is hard wired directly to my primary battery, both ground and positive to maximize power and minimize voltage drop.



    Winching is a great tool. Its a real great tool when you know how to do it. Its deadly when you dont.


    Recovery and winching is all about physics... no magic involved.

    Here is a diagram of winch pulling power using snatch blocks to increase the pulling power.
    13085d1373545736-rigging-snatch-block-ma_9f4ff7a562a757f8bb40698a9a81ada6a994439e.jpg
    If the top truck has a 10,000lb winch:

    1:1, you have 10,000lbs of pulling power
    2:1, you now have about 20,000lbs of pulling power
    3:1, you now have about 30,000lbs of pulling power.

    Think of it like a 4-lo or a low speed transfer case/crawl box. Its just using gearing to get the power in the area where its most useful.


    So you want to pull yourself backwards with a winch mounted on the front. You'll need enough line plus three snatch blocks.
    [​IMG]


    Examples
    LC had gotten too close to the soft shoulder... tried to drive himself back on the trail, only getting further off the trail. The truck was teetering and ready to roll.

    [​IMG]

    The trail is only wide enough for one vehicle. There were not an abundance of trees on the uphill side either. This is how we recovered it.

    The two yellow circles are trees that were too far away, so we used straps to connect to a snatch block in the middle of the field that gave us a good side angle. This was my winch line connected to the frame of the truck to keep it from rolling. The vehicle on the left winched in while using me as an anchor. A line always wants to go in a straight line so it pulled his truck in line with us. As you can see, a good amount of recovery gear was needed.

    For this recovery we used:
    1x 80ft winch extension
    1x 30ft recovery strap
    1x 10ft tree strap
    1x snatch/pulley block
    2x winches
    1x 10ft chain
    1x frame keys
    5x shackles

    [​IMG]
    Another great thing this diagram shows is the danger zones. When winching/recovering, you always want to be far away from any of the components or vehicles. But you also dont want to be in the projectile zones. If you look at all the angles created, you can just imagine them as slingshots. If something goes wrong near the snatch block, it'll have the most force going down and right or up and left. But it can also break and shoot directly to the right. You want to be clear of the areas.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXxLh8shMu8


    RECOVERY STRAPS - PROPER USAGE
    How recovery straps work and how to use them properlyBy Robert B. of Gator4x4 Club
    pulled from http://www.offroaders.com/tech/Tow_Straps.htm


    The right recovery straps and how to use them can make the difference if you can pull your vehicle out safely or if you have to wait on a tow truck. A high quality strap without hooks attached to it is the strap you want to use for getting a vehicle unstuck.

    This is NOT a recovery strap:
    [​IMG]




    The above is called a "tow" strap. The main reason not to use this for recovery is simple. If the recovery strap or your recovery hardware breaks, it's not safe to have a metal hook flying off at speeds in excess of 100 mph.

    Many people have been killed and seriously injured by using these straps incorrectly. These straps will not stretch because they are made for towing, not recovery.

    Let me first clarify what we are talking about.
    Here is a recovery strap:
    [​IMG]





    How a Recovery Strap Works

    The strap works like this. Say for example you are pulling out your friend, so you attach your recovery strap to the back of your vehicle and then to the front of his. As you drive away from him the recovery strap stretches just like a rubber band. The strap wants to go back to its normal size, so it has no other choice than to transfer the energy to the stuck vehicle, pulling it out.

    Recovery straps are flat with sewn loops and no hooks. They are nylon, not polypropylene or Dacron or chain. Because the straps are made of Nylon, they stretch. They are safer than chains, easier to use, and not nearly as heavy.

    Specifications
    I've seen recovery straps come in lengths of 20 to 40 feet and widths from 2 to 6 inches. A general rule of thumb, each inch of width will allow you to pull out about 10,000 lbs. So if I have a 3 inch wide strap, it would be rated to tug up to 30,000 lbs. Many will then ask, why not go all the way up to a 6" wide recovery strap? The problem is that the strap becomes less elastic the wider it gets, which means it will not work properly. Typically a 2" or 3" wide recovery strap will suit all of your needs.

    Tips for Recovery Strap Use

    • Before ever using the strap, make sure it is in good condition ( no cuts, frays, or broken stitching.)
    • Make sure the hardware being used is free of defects and rust. This includes your tow hooks or front hitch and the hardware on the other vehicle. If possible, the recovering vehicle should place the recovery strap to its rear end, which would be the safest place if the strap happens to break.
    • You may be able to wrap the strap around a hitch, but I would not put it IN the hitch. I have seen a few people who have bent the pin, which then had to be cut out. Getting a tow hook or D-Ring adaptor to go into the hitch is a better idea. Here is an example of a D-Ring adaptor and how a recovery strap should be hooked up to one:



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    • Some older cars actually have tow hooks, but if not you must use your own judgment. Never attach a recovery strap to a vehicles bumpers, axles, suspension, steering rods, or a trailer hitch ball. The attach points must be to a secure place on the vehicles frame. Do not place the recovery strap on another vehicle in a way that it may be cut.
    • Never, ever, attach a recovery strap to another vehicle with a knot. You should pass one end of the strap through the loop at the other end of the strap to secure it on.
    • Incase the strap may break, lay a tarp or some jackets on top of the recovery strap. When the strap breaks (lets hope for the best, but prepare for the worst), the jackets or tarp will slow the recovery strap down before it hits someone.
    • To help protect the strap from tears, make sure all logs and large rocks are removed from the recovery path. Everyone should stand clear of the recovery strap when it is in use.
    • When pulling the vehicle out, drive very slowly. Sudden tugs may lead to damage to either of the vehicles or the strap.
    • Once the vehicle is safely removed, inspect your recovery strap and hardware and hit the road!
    In addition to these recommendations, read the instructions your recovery strap comes with. To protect your strap, store it out of sunlight and away from heat and keep it clean. Dirt, mud and debris embedded in a tow strap actually damages the fibers over time and can decrease its strength. After a muddy day of wheeling and recovery, always clean your straps by hosing them off and spray horizontally across the strap as not to push the debris into the strap fibers. Happy Recovering!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    Joining two straps together

    If not, you can easily slip two straps over each other, and put something in the middle of the loop to keep them from forever being joined.

    The first part shows joining two straps the proper way, second part is a recovery with a kinetic/snatch strap.




    you can also use a tool called a dog bone or cinch bone for this purpose

    recovery 16.jpg


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qV9lr6hBXJg

    Pull-Pal Winch Anchor
    Model RW9000

    pulled from

    Authoring and Photography by: Dr. Sean Michael
    Edited by: Randy Burleson
    First Published: September 2000

    http://www.4x4wire.com/reviews/pullpal97/


    [​IMG]
    The Pull-Pal ready for action, and also folded.
    As a rock climber, I understand the importance of good anchors. If you climb a route, you can top-rope with a solid anchor point at the cliff's top, lead-climb and find suitable anchor points as you climb, or free solo and be so confident that you do not need a rope or anchors. Rock climbing is like serious four wheeling; dependable anchors often make the difference between making progress or turning around... or walking home to get the cavalry.

    Unlike climbers, four wheelers have been slow to develop means of creating their own anchor points. Winching can be inefficient and frustrating because it typically relies on trees, rocks, or other vehicles as anchors. An ideal anchor point would be directly in the path of desired travel, but unless there is a lead vehicle (which could more easily use a pull strap), the path itself is often devoid of anchors. Off-line pulls, complex pulley systems, and buried tires are just a few examples of the unsavory, time-consuming, and dangerous consequences that are caused by inadequate anchors. Enter the concept of the Pull-Pal, a self-burrowing anchor that can be located precisely where needed, rather than where landscape features allow.



    History

    In the early '70s, Jan Gremillion's father enjoyed four-wheeling in the sands of Blyth, CA. It was a fateful and frustrating day that inspired the Pull-Pal. Seriously stuck in the sand, with no good anchor, her father spent two hours walking to find help -- and considering ideas for an anchor. He married his four-wheeling needs with his childhood experience with farm plows. The original Pull-Pal resides with Jan and her husband Pat, a reminder of the Pull-Pal's enduring design. The Pull-Pal's design has gone through numerous design refinements spread over a quarter century of testing.

    [​IMG]
    Dig the tip of the spade in and the Pull-Pal does the rest.
    The Pull-Pal anchor, sold to the public since '92, is produced in-house at the Gremillions' Colorado facility, as is their other well-known product, the Premier Power Welder. The Pull-Pal consists of a removable steel spade that mounts to an armature (using a locking lever), which folds for compact storage. In soft soils, only a small divot is required to get the spade's sharpened tip to bite in, though harder ground may require a deeper divot or a person to hold the spade upright. With the tip set, the force of the winch sends the angled spade into the ground.

    Finish quality is excellent, and the Pull-Pal comes in two sizes:

    • Model RW 9000, recommended for all vehicles up to 9000 pounds (tested, here). Unit weighs 30 pounds. Size is 45 inches long when folded.
    • Model RW 6000, recommended for Samurai-sized vehicles. Unit weighs 24 pounds. Size is 32 inches long when folded.


    Testing

    Camel Trophy teams, as well as the team that made the first winter ascent of Mt. Washington, give impressive testimonials for the Pull-Pal. These groups encountered predominantly mud or snow/ice terrain. The test vehicle, unless otherwise noted, is a 4800lb '89 Trooper with a Ramsey REP6000 winch.

    Loose Dirt

    In the Palouse region of eastern Idaho and western Washington state, wheat is king. The landscape, dominated by agriculture, makes drivers feel as though they are moving through a giant mogul field. The round hills rise a hundred feet high, and span a few hundred yards across. The resulting steep slopes require special hydraulically-suspended combines to harvest the crops. Those same slopes offer a vast testing ground for off-road products.

    Jeff Nelson and three partners farm 4,000 acres of the Palouse. My friend Jeff knows soil, so based on my description of the test I wanted to run, he took me to a bowl with slopes of over 25 percent. The field had been tilled to 18 inches deep as part of testing on a new implement.

    [​IMG]
    The Pull-Pal digs in and down...
    We parked the Trooper at the bottom of the slope, and pulled about 100 feet of winch cable to the top of the slope, where the Pull-Pal was set in place. The loose, freshly tilled dirt meant that dropping the anchor's 40 pound weight sent the spade tip 2-3 inches into the ground, and a firm downward push was enough to keep it upright. We linked a 'D' shackle through the Pull-Pal's attachment hole because the hook was too big to fit, then hooked to the shackle and began taking in cable. The Ramsey sent the Pull-Pal spade steadily into the loose dirt. When the spade's near two foot length was out of view, we released the Trooper's parking brake and took it out of gear. (Note that the Pull-Pal is intended to be used to assist wheels in motion, and is not designed to pull dead loads. We just used the brake to set the anchor.) More winching sent the Pull-Pal progressively further into the ground, but resulted in no movement of the truck. As the top of the anchor dove out of sight, I began to think my farmer friend was right when he questioned the Pull-Pal. The trough that started from the original divot stretched eight feet downhill when the Trooper began to move. From that point on, the Pull-Pal did not budge, and the Ramsey steadily took in cable until the Trooper sat just downhill from its anchor. Enter the shovel.

    [​IMG]
    Digging the Pull-Pal out can be the hardest part of using it!
    A few minutes of digging revealed much about the soil and why the Pull Pal had not initially taken hold. Despite the steep slope, spring rains had left the soil very damp. Its consistency from 6-18" deep was like potting clay: damp and plastic. The Pull-Pal had submarined through this greasy layer, stopping when its tip met the resistance of the damp but untilled layer below 18 inches. Extracting the device took about 5 minutes, though the spade was the only portion that actually needed to be dug out. Cleaning off the sticky soil took a few more minutes, but was relatively easy thanks to the steel's hard, slick zinc coating. The Pull-Pal breaks down easily for storage, the armature smoothly hinging back into its stowed configuration (45 inches in length stowed vs. more than 5 feet when open).


    [​IMG]
    In loose rubble, the spade would dig in but not always find sufficient resistance.
    Loose Rubble

    To test the Pull-Pal in rocky ground, we used an abandoned rock quarry. The terrain was composed of igneous rock that ranged in size from small flakes to pumpkins sized chunks, all intermixed with a small amount of dry soil.

    Our results were less positive in this unyielding terrain. The Pull-Pal relies upon finding an appropriate amount of resistance. Either too much or too little resistance means the anchor can't do its job. In the quarry's rubble, when set into various sizes of starter holes, the Pull-Pal either failed to find a hold, or began to dig in, only to level out and dig a shallow trough as the tip apparently ran into dense rock that couldn't be penetrated. Repeated tests yielded the same results. In this terrain, either the surface was too hard and could not be penetrated, or it was so loose that the unit was pulled through the upper foot or so of ground. We speculate that a significant hole, maybe 18 inches deep, would have to be dug to reach a point where the anchor could both penetrate for a hold and encounter significant resistance once the spade had set in.

    [​IMG]
    Hard, rocky soil provided solid anchoring.
    Rocky Hardpan

    After disappointment in the quarry's moonscape, we tested the Pull-Pal in rocky hardpan that did not exhibit the extremes found in the quarry. The dry hardpan ground was made up of gravel mixed with heavy clay soils and had been compacted by earthmoving equipment. We made a small divot, about the size of a grapefruit, in a small slope that angled away from the truck. This was more than adequate for the spade to take hold. As the picture shows, complete spade penetration was unnecessary to give sufficient resistance for the Ramsey to overcome the Trooper's 4.55 gears, parking brake, and a large rock wheel block.

    Conclusions

    The Pull-Pal has been steadily gaining acceptance within off-roading circles as THE anchoring device to carry. Not surprisingly, global military powers have also begun to recognize the device's capabilities, purchasing numerous units for combat extrication.

    The Pull-Pal clearly can provide a viable anchor where none exists, but it has other benefits which are easier to overlook. This anchor can decrease wear and tear by allowing you to select your choice of anchoring locations. This allows you to winch from the first layer of cable, and also allows you to avoid most angled pulls. Though the Camel Trophy testimonials for the Pull-Pal are impressive, for most of us, reducing the strains on personalities and equipment could be the biggest selling point.

    We tested in a variety of soil types and proved the Pull-Pal's outstanding anchoring effectiveness. Even in very loose soils, this anchor is easily set by one person, creates substantial resistance, and requires relatively little effort to extricate.

    The Pull-Pal harnesses your winch's power and dives down until it meets enough resistance to counter the drag of your vehicle. Even when the Pull-Pal dives deeply, extracting it is not difficult.

    • Not many will encounter soil (not sand) that is looser than we tested. If you do, you can expect the Pull-Pal to dive down until it meets enough resistance to counter the drag of your vehicle.
    • Testing in hardpan gravel-clay revealed that the anchor creates sufficient resistance after having only buried a portion of the spade.
    • In loose rock with soil filler, we found the Pull-Pal dug long furrows without setting, searching in vain for resistance. This is especially problematic if a compacted rock layer lies below the loose rock layer, because the anchor can't always find purchase in the hidden rock layer.
    Because terrain with the latter soil profile is rarely encountered outside of a quarry, this test was more relevant for understanding how the Pull-Pal searches for resistance than for actually predicting how it will perform in conditions readers will one day face. Still, it was apparent that given a shovel and some imagination the device could be effectively anchored even in "soil" such as this.

    How would a stuck enthusiast fare in similar featureless landscapes without the Pull-Pal? Let's just say that removing, burying, and recovering your spare tire, especially in hardpan, would have been a more challenging work out... if that is why you going four wheeling!


    Splicing and repairing synthetic winch rope

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xavi1qzlfAI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjhBEe_8XHg&list=PLDEC93467E4AA63C9

    tools for the job

    http://factor55.com/product/fast-fid-new/

    or a dowel and some electrical tape :thumbsup:


    Using your recovery boards

    https://youtu.be/KzPj0k14jJk


    https://youtu.be/Fgtf5R7aDpk
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  4. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:38 AM
    #4
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    Recovery tools and equipment

    Please post about your equipment and a description of what it is and what to use it for


    Choosing a recovery strap
    http://blog.uscargocontrol.com/how-to-choose-a-recovery-strap-or-tow-strap/

    Tow/Recovery Strap


    This strap is a basic strap for flat towing or being able to pull a vehicle. Being that it is a strap, it does have some stretch to it, but it is not designed to be used to jerk a vehicle free. This can break the strap, or the recovery points being used. Straps used in recoveries should have loops on the ends, no hooks.



    [​IMG]

    Kinetic/Snatch Strap

    This strap looks similar to a basic recovery strap but it has built in stretch to it. It will allow you to build up momentum to pull a vehicle without the shock of a recovery strap. Think of it as a very heavy duty rubber band.

    recovery 3'.png

    recovery 4.jpg


    Tree Saver Strap

    A fancy name for a short (usually 10 foot) recovery strap. It is used for wrapping around a tree to use it as an anchor point without damaging the tree.

    recovery 1.jpg
    recovery 2.jpg


    [​IMG]
    Chains for recovery

    Chains are useful in some situations where fabric straps are not. If you must connect to a frame rail or axle for a recovery when no other points are available or feasible in the circumstances, using a chain is a better idea to keep the strap from being cut on sharp edges. Grade 80 or 100 chain is preferred for recovery use.

    recovery 7.jpg

    recovery 8.jpg



    Hooks

    Hooks are still used on chains, winch lines and in recoveries. Hooks come in open, with latches, or hooks that when pulled, keep the hook shut.

    recovery 17.jpg

    recovery 18.jpg

    recovery 19.jpg


    Synthetic winch rope


    Synthetic winch line is a fabric rope that is much lighter than metal cables. It is easier to handle, but is more susceptible to damage from being exposed to dirt or abrasions from objects. When dirt gets into the rope and it is used, the dirt will slowly degrade the rope. It can be soaked in water occasionally or after being submerged in mud to keep it working like new.

    recovery 10.jpg

    recovery 11.jpg




    Winch cable

    Winch cable is metal, heavier, but less susceptible to abrasions. Heavy gloves should always be used due to the possibility of frayed metal cable that will easily slice through your skin.
    RECOVEREY 12.jpg

    recovery 13.jpg

    Snatch Block

    A snatch block is a pulley that is used to redirect the winch cable to an object.

    If a snatch block is used with steel winch cable, it should never be used with synthetic rope again. The steel cable creates sharp grooves and spurs on the snatch block that will tear apart the synthetic rope.


    recovery 20.jpg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73vnrGYmS5U

    D-ring/shackles

    The most popular size d-rings are 3/4”, smaller ones are 5/8”.

    soft shackles are another form of a d ring where a synthetic rope is used in a fashion to make a loop that can be used in place of a metal d ring where there is no abrasive contact or risk of a cable snapping could cause the ring to go flying

    Shackles have a Working Load Limit; make sure you are choosing one based on the required strength and not because it's been powder-coated your favorite color or has a polyurethane silencer (better yet, quit leaving these attached to your rig; keep them in a gear bag). Shackle screw pins are not to be threaded all the way in when in use; thread the pin in until it stops, then back it off some (quarter/half a turn).

    [​IMG]


    soft shackles

    [​IMG]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqFHQ7YK8x4


    Traction Boards


    Many different brands of traction boards are on the market these days. They offer the ability to add additional grip when needed to get you un-stuck. They can also be used as ramps or to bridge ruts when stacked appropriately. It is a good idea to have a string or rope attached to the end of the boards so they are easy to locate after using them since they easily get buried in sand/snow/mud after use.


    recovery 21.jpg

    Hi Lift/farm Jack

    The Hi Lift jack is a great multi purpose tool, but it also can be very dangerous when used improperly. Care must be taken every time you use it.


    Hitch pin


    The hitch pin that you usually put through a hitch is a great way to attach a strap to a hitch receiver. It is a horrible idea to attach a strap to a hitch ball. The ball can easily become a projectile hurling through the air at 100+mph, going through windshields and bodies.
    DCP_1253_e724694a4329346437f4e3df8aae53ea4f1e3b1d.jpg

    Frame Keys/J Hooks

    These are items that you will more likely find on a wrecker/tow truck. The frame keys fir into the holes on the frames of vehicles to act as a recovery point. The frame hooks/J hooks are a basic hook that allow you to hook to more items for recovery.

    recovery 9.jpg


    recovery 22.jpg

    factor 55 and other closed hook devices

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QG_F4qYUf_4

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_k0iEvph9o

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTFsCPWNyns
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  5. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:39 AM
    #5
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  6. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:39 AM
    #6
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    Recovery equipment review. What to get and what not to get.

    My equipment: 12k X2O Smittybilt, Factor-55 E-link, Synthetic Line, Assortment of Snatch blocks, chains, tow straps, tree savers and D-rings.

    1. 12,000 lbs X2O smittybilt
    The winch has been an incredible investment and I am extremely pleased with the brand. It is lifetime warranty and without even batting an eye when I call they immediately ship out brand new parts. There was an update in their product and they sent me the new product as a replacement without needing anything in return. This winch also has the wired or wireless option. I love the wireless option as it gives me better control and the wired option backup is perfect if your battery dies. In addition, if you are using a winch with someone else controlling the mechanism then ensure that you clearly cover communication between yourself and the operator. (Don't assume the two of you understand all the hand and arm signals or will be able to hear each other clearly, GO and NO sound very similar....you get my drift)


    2. synthetic rope

    The synthetic rope is something I also enjoy. I hate the cable because of burrs and stored kinetic energy upon breaks. I also acknowledge that it also much more susceptible to wear, sun damage, dirt and could leave you stranded. I replace it about every two years. My winch is hidden which helps from some UV, but road grime gets piled in there quickly.

    3. Factor-55 E-link
    The Factor-55 E-link is pretty cool and offers options. I have no issues with it, but you must ensure when tension hits any connector that it pulls longitudinally or parallel with the pull so as to exert the force in the way the D-rings or connector was designed.


    4. The tow straps and tree savers
    The tow straps and tree savers are straight forward. I have yet to invest in a snatch strap. I missed out on a hell of a deal here last week. However, I like the Bubba Rope setups and will most likely acquire one of those. The only thing about a snatch strap is once you start down this violent path of snatching there is little that can be done if things go wrong. Clear the rope, clear all personnel and plan for the worst possible outcome if/when the either vehicle breaks free. I think it is great for snow/mud environments, but probably wouldn't go to this method first in a dry environment. I'm sure sand/desert would be a logical situation, but I have no experience here.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  7. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:49 AM
    #7
    CO MTN Steve

    CO MTN Steve Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2014
    Member:
    #131742
    Messages:
    7,590
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Steve
    RaMbLiN' CoLoRaDo
    Vehicle:
    2015 Taco DCSB Blue
    Lifted, Armored, needs more lights.
  8. Jan 5, 2017 at 7:50 AM
    #8
    Stig

    Stig Resident smartass

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    Member:
    #149340
    Messages:
    13,182
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brandon
    Vehicle:
    Ta no mo
    Update:

    So, after putting that list up and remembering a friend who made an easier list to use, I did the same so it can easily be adjusted and/or added and subtracted from.

    Vehicle recovery basics list
    http://a.co/9mP2Ry2

    And I also went ahead and did a vehicle go bag/survival bag
    http://a.co/5ejOllS

    For both lists, I chose items that I would not worry about having in my kit. You can always upgrade items to better that will be more expensive or swap similar prices for a brand/style/color that matches what you want.

    Vehicle Recovery List:
    More shackles and straps are better (especially the inexpensive static straps). With extra tree savers or longer straps, it will allow you to do things like use your hi lift as a winch (I've used it by itself and I've used it as a secondary winch while I was using my winch. The hi lift kept the rear of the truck from sliding off the edge. Another main component are the shackles. Having more is always better than less. As with some of the examples I showed earlier in this thread, a simple recovery done safely requires a bunch of straps and shackles.

    You might ask why I put a winch extension and snatch block on there if you dont have a winch. You can use that extension and a snatch block just like you would if you had a winch. Make sure snatch blocks are always only used for either synthetic or cable. Once you use one with a cable winch line, never use it for synthetic again because it will rip the rope with the cuts the cable puts into the metal. I had an ARB and the smittybilt that I listed and only ever used the smittybilt. And it was used a lot!

    This is not a complete list, but just a good idea for starters, or a good refresher/reminder of some small item that you might've overlooked.

    Vehicle survival bag:
    Again, i put items that I would trust. For most of the stuff, the multiple packs were just as cheap as a single item in which case the multiples were put in the cart. Its never a bad idea to throw those items in another vehicle, backpack, or use them to create a second bag.

    This also is not a complete list, but just a good idea for starters, or a good refresher/reminder of some small item that you might've overlooked.

    The lists will change as I add/subtract or substitute items. If there is something I forgot, let me know and I'll put it on there. Or if you have a question of why something is on there, ask away!



    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    Not complete, just a quick start I did last night before sleeping.


    Common Recovery Items


    Tow/Recovery Strap

    This strap is a basic strap for flat towing or being able to pull a vehicle. Being that it is a strap, it does have some stretch to it, but it is not designed to be used to jerk a vehicle free. This can break the strap, or the recovery points being used. Straps used in recoveries should have loops on the ends, no hooks.

    A good strap will typically have a different color thread down the middle of the strap. That thread is in there as a sign of when to replace the strap. After each recovery you should check the strap for fraying, damage, and to make sure that the indicator stripe down the middle is one solid stripe. If it is broken, you need to replace the strap.

    [​IMG]

    Kinetic/Snatch Strap

    This strap looks similar to a basic recovery strap but it has built in stretch to it. It will allow you to build up momentum to pull a vehicle without the shock of a recovery strap. Think of it as a very heavy duty rubber band. As you can see, it looks exactly like a static recovery strap.

    [​IMG]


    Tree Saver Strap

    A fancy name for a short (usually 8-10 foot) recovery strap. It is used for wrapping around a tree to use it as an anchor point without damaging the tree.

    [​IMG]


    Chains

    Chains are useful in some situations where fabric straps are not. If you must connect to a frame rail or axle for a recovery when no other points are available or feasible in the circumstances, using a chain is a better idea to keep the strap from being cut on sharp edges. Grade 80 or 100 chain is preferred for recovery use. Grade 80/100 will be expensive, but quality is what you need in recovery gear.

    [​IMG]


    Hooks

    Hooks are still used on chains, winch lines and in recoveries. Hooks come in open, with latches, or hooks that when pulled, keep the hook shut.

    Positive Locking Hook As you pull, it makes sure that the hook is shut.
    [​IMG]

    Hook with latch
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Open Hook
    images_32d50c55d0c8317cc8e862b63c9332f57f7a366b.jpg


    Synthetic winch rope

    Synthetic winch line is a fabric rope that is much lighter than metal cables. It is easier to handle, but is more susceptible to damage from being exposed to dirt or abrasions from objects. When dirt gets into the rope and it is used, the dirt will slowly degrade the rope. It can be soaked in water occasionally or after being submerged in mud to keep it working like new.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Thimble: Is the metal loop located on the end of a winch line.
    [​IMG]


    Winch cable

    Winch cable is metal, heavier, but less susceptible to abrasions. Heavy gloves should always be used due to the possibility of frayed metal cable that will easily slice through your skin.

    [​IMG]


    Snatch Block

    A snatch block is a pulley that is used to redirect the winch cable to an object.

    If I snatch block is used with steel winch cable, it should never be used with synthetic rope again. The steel cable creates sharp grooves and spurs on the snatch block that will tear apart the synthetic rope.

    [​IMG]

    D-ring/shackles

    The most popular size d-rings are 3/4”, smaller ones are 5/8”.

    [​IMG]
    When using a D-ring, you place it through the strap/object you are connecting and tighten down the pin. The pin is the straight bolt like part. After the pin is fully seated, back it out one half a turn. This way after you pull on it, it will be easy to turn. If you leave it fully tightened, you may have to break out tools to get leverage to turn the pin.

    Traction Boards

    Many different brands of traction boards are on the market these days. They offer the ability to add additional grip when needed to get you un-stuck. They can also be used as ramps or to bridge ruts when stacked appropriately. It is a good idea to have a string or rope attached to the end of the boards so they are easy to locate after using them since they easily get buried in sand/snow/mud after use.

    [​IMG]

    Hi Lift/farm Jack

    The Hi Lift jack is a great multi purpose tool, but it also can be very dangerous when used improperly. Care must be taken every time you use it. NEVER put any body parts you care about between the jack handle and the jack when using it.

    [​IMG]

    Hitch pin

    The hitch pin that you usually put through a hitch is a great way to attach a strap to a hitch receiver. It is a horrible idea to attach a strap to a hitch ball. The ball can easily become a projectile hurling through the air at 100+mph, going through windshields and bodies.
    [​IMG]


    Frame Keys/J Hooks

    These are items that you will more likely find on a wrecker/tow truck. The frame keys fir into the holes on the frames of vehicles to act as a recovery point. The frame hooks/J hooks are a basic hook that allow you to hook to more items for recovery.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
    This site contains affiliate links for which the site may be compensated.
    #8
  9. Jan 5, 2017 at 8:23 AM
    #9
    zippsub9

    zippsub9 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Member:
    #141634
    Messages:
    4,316
    Gender:
    Male
    Halfmoon, NY
    Vehicle:
    14 DCLB
    Shit bolted onto other shit, and junk.
    Sub'd. Great thread.

    I have done a lot of offroad recovery in austere conditions (mud, rocky, sand) with wheels and tracks) J8 is the ASI (additional skill identifier) given to school trained recovery specialist. Working with them truly opened my eyes. I have also observed horrible recovery operations involving injury and loss of limbs. I will try my best to contribute to the body of knowledge here with personal experiences.

    My equipment: 12k X2O Smittybilt, Factor-55 E-link, Synthetic Line, Assortment of Snatch blocks, chains, tow straps, tree savers and D-rings.

    1. The winch has been an incredible investment and I am extremely pleased with the brand. It is lifetime warranty and without even batting an eye when I call they immediately ship out brand new parts. There was an update in their product and they sent me the new product as a replacement without needing anything in return. This winch also has the wired or wireless option. I love the wireless option as it gives me better control and the wired option backup is perfect if your battery dies. In addition, if you are using a winch with someone else controlling the mechanism then ensure that you clearly cover communication between yourself and the operator. (Don't assume the two of you understand all the hand and arm signals or will be able to hear each other clearly, GO and NO sound very similar....you get my drift)

    2. The synthetic rope is something I also enjoy. I hate the cable because of burrs and stored kinetic energy upon breaks. I also acknowledge that it also much more susceptible to wear, sun damage, dirt and could leave you stranded. I replace it about every two years. My winch is hidden which helps from some UV, but road grime gets piled in there quickly.

    3. The Factor-55 E-link is pretty cool and offers options. I have no issues with it, but you must ensure when tension hits any connector that it pulls longitudinally or parallel with the pull so as to exert the force in the way the D-rings or connector was designed.

    4. The tow straps and tree savers are straight forward. I have yet to invest in a snatch strap. I missed out on a hell of a deal here last week. However, I like the Bubba Rope setups and will most likely acquire one of those. The only thing about a snatch strap is once you start down this violent path of snatching there is little that can be done if things go wrong. Clear the rope, clear all personnel and plan for the worst possible outcome if/when the either vehicle breaks free. I think it is great for snow/mud environments, but probably wouldn't go to this method first in a dry environment. I'm sure sand/desert would be a logical situation, but I have no experience here.

    5. I will add more as I go watching the snow come down here in Colorado. It is awesome. I get to practice quite a bit when the weather goes bad helping folks out of the snow. I know my limits and am not negligent, but be careful when you offer help as we live in a litigious environment and everybody wants to sue for something they never had or earned in the first place. Below is a link from a post by @Mxpatriot, incredibly useful and insightful with a ton of experience on recovery and review on different tactics, techniques and procedures.

    https://www.tacomaworld.com/threads/going-alone-single-vehicle-wheeling-safety.454083/

    Hope this helps somebody.
     
  10. Jan 5, 2017 at 8:27 AM
    #10
    thefatkid

    thefatkid Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2013
    Member:
    #101370
    Messages:
    4,344
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brian
    Colorado
    Vehicle:
    2004 thingy
  11. Jan 5, 2017 at 8:34 AM
    #11
    crazysccrmd

    crazysccrmd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2016
    Member:
    #181592
    Messages:
    8,553
    Gender:
    Male
    Alaska
    Vehicle:
    Aprilia Tuareg 660
    OdinBow and CO MTN Steve like this.
  12. Jan 5, 2017 at 9:03 AM
    #12
    teamhypoxia

    teamhypoxia MichelinMan

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2012
    Member:
    #85247
    Messages:
    9,637
    Gender:
    Male
    Colorado
    Vehicle:
    '12 DCSB TRD OR
    I finally got to use my soft shackle in anger the other day.

    Gator something or other....

    I always thought they seemed like a great idea and nothing about using it changed my mind. I might even pick up another one or two.

    We used it to connect two straps that were too short by themselves for our purposes. A regular shackle in that application would've been a very dangerous missile if a strap had broken. No big deal with a soft shackle.

    Curious if anyone has anything negative to say about them or knows of any instances where they should be avoided.
     
    CharlieCafe and CO MTN Steve like this.
  13. Jan 5, 2017 at 9:12 AM
    #13
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    Using them around a tree/clearing an opstical out of theway where there is risk of abrasions to the shcackle is the only time i would not use mine.
     
  14. Jan 5, 2017 at 9:28 AM
    #14
    Stig

    Stig Resident smartass

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    Member:
    #149340
    Messages:
    13,182
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brandon
    Vehicle:
    Ta no mo
    It worked, and since we had the soft shackle, that was the only reason we did it that way. If not, you can easily slip two straps over each other, and put something in the middle of the loop to keep them from forever being joined.

    The first part shows joining two straps the proper way, second part is a recovery with a kinetic/snatch strap.

     
  15. Jan 5, 2017 at 9:38 AM
    #15
    Stig

    Stig Resident smartass

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    Member:
    #149340
    Messages:
    13,182
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Brandon
    Vehicle:
    Ta no mo
    Winching


    Winching is a great tool. Its a real great tool when you know how to do it. Its deadly when you dont.


    Recovery and winching is all about physics... no magic involved.

    Here is a diagram of winch pulling power using snatch blocks to increase the pulling power.

    13085d1373545736-rigging-snatch-block-ma_9f4ff7a562a757f8bb40698a9a81ada6a994439e.jpg
    If the top truck has a 10,000lb winch:

    1:1, you have 10,000lbs of pulling power
    2:1, you now have about 20,000lbs of pulling power
    3:1, you now have about 30,000lbs of pulling power.

    Think of it like a 4-lo or a low speed transfer case/crawl box. Its just using gearing to get the power in the area where its most useful.


    So you want to pull yourself backwards with a winch mounted on the front. You'll need enough line plus three snatch blocks.
    [​IMG]



    Examples

    LC had gotten too close to the soft shoulder... tried to drive himself back on the trail, only getting further off the trail. The truck was teetering and ready to roll.

    [​IMG]

    The trail is only wide enough for one vehicle. There were not an abundance of trees on the uphill side either. This is how we recovered it.

    The two yellow circles are trees that were too far away, so we used straps to connect to a snatch block in the middle of the field that gave us a good side angle. This was my winch line connected to the frame of the truck to keep it from rolling. The vehicle on the left winched in while using me as an anchor. A line always wants to go in a straight line so it pulled his truck in line with us. As you can see, a good amount of recovery gear was needed.

    For this recovery we used:
    1x 80ft winch extension
    1x 30ft recovery strap
    1x 10ft tree strap
    1x snatch/pulley block
    2x winches
    1x 10ft chain
    1x frame keys
    5x shackles

    [​IMG]
    Another great thing this diagram shows is the danger zones. When winching/recovering, you always want to be far away from any of the components or vehicles. But you also dont want to be in the projectile zones. If you look at all the angles created, you can just imagine them as slingshots. If something goes wrong near the snatch block, it'll have the most force going down and right or up and left. But it can also break and shoot directly to the right. You want to be clear of the areas.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  16. Jan 5, 2017 at 9:45 AM
    #16
    zippsub9

    zippsub9 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Member:
    #141634
    Messages:
    4,316
    Gender:
    Male
    Halfmoon, NY
    Vehicle:
    14 DCLB
    Shit bolted onto other shit, and junk.
    Great diagram to show the force multipliers of snatch blocks. Another misnomer folks have when they purchase a winch is the size. They assume they only need rated to their vehicle curb weight. They don't consider the friction factor of mud, snow, sand, water and gravitational effects of pulling out of hole. It is much more than just pulling on flat dry land of non-stuck vehicle. In addition, the winch is the only accessory on my truck that is hard wired directly to my primary battery, both ground and positive to maximize power and minimize voltage drop.
     
  17. Jan 5, 2017 at 9:51 AM
    #17
    BYJOSHCOOK

    BYJOSHCOOK Mr. Mojo Risin

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2013
    Member:
    #105887
    Messages:
    27,713
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Josh
    Woodstock and Alpharetta Ga
    Vehicle:
    2000 SR5 4WD Lunar Mist
    Check Out My Builds
    I never thought of the friction factor. That's a good point, I'll go the next weight limit up when it comes time for deciding a winch
     
    3378jakesr5[OP] and Stig like this.
  18. Jan 5, 2017 at 10:12 AM
    #18
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    @zippsub9 and @aero3685 please post new or pm me with things so i know what i have and dont have rather then editing old posts :hattip:
     
    zippsub9 and Stig like this.
  19. Jan 5, 2017 at 11:38 AM
    #19
    T-Rex266

    T-Rex266 Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Member:
    #53447
    Messages:
    27,890
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    Elon
    Cleaned of bs. Let's try to keep the first few pages clear of clutter
     
  20. Jan 5, 2017 at 12:31 PM
    #20
    3378jakesr5

    3378jakesr5 [OP] AOF, trucks, guns, repeat....

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Member:
    #141018
    Messages:
    13,860
    Gender:
    Male
    First Name:
    jake
    littleton colorado
    Vehicle:
    2006 DCLB silver taco. Soild axle swapped, Bumpers, armor, expo..... Money pit. Yata yata yata
    Better to ask what I have not done.
    Looks like we have a lot of repeats. Ill take and transplant posts to the main so it stays at the front of everything and then post updated in the thread and people can add more in new posts and when i go through and add that ill delet the old updated and put a new one in so you can clean up repeats.
     
    jubei and T-Rex266[QUOTED] like this.
To Top