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Running Tips

Discussion in 'Health' started by pinktaco808, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. Sep 14, 2016 at 11:11 PM
    #1
    pinktaco808

    pinktaco808 [OP] Hot Steppa

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    Any suggestions on running faster? stretching before a run? what to eat? what shoes are good? thanks
     
  2. Sep 14, 2016 at 11:37 PM
    #2
    Dalandser

    Dalandser ¡Me Gustan Las Taco-mas!

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    I hate running but I'll hike for 6-9 hours with little time taken out for breaks and I think you're onto the right track with (healthy) food and stretching making you be more capable physically. Water I'm not sure about, but I'd be interested in hearing what some runners have to say. I drink a lot of water so more water gets my vote, but I know not everyone drinks a lot who are good runners or at least they don't bring water with them while they run.
     
    pinktaco808 [OP] likes this.
  3. Sep 18, 2016 at 9:39 AM
    #3
    natas1321

    natas1321 mischief monkey

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    I'm not fast by any means but I do run 6-8 miles a night, I don't really stretch much maybe 5 minutes worth but I do believe shoes make a world of difference. Everyone is going to be different I would go to a few stores and check out several brands and see what feels best to you. There are also shoes stores that will see how you walk and or run and can direct you to a certain type of shoe that should fit you best for your form/stride. I personally try to eat a decent amount of protein in the am and for lunch and have a light dinner before I run in the evenings.
     
    Dalandser and pinktaco808 [OP] like this.
  4. Sep 19, 2016 at 5:46 AM
    #4
    Lord Helmet

    Lord Helmet Prepare To Attack

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    I tend to stretch before and after a run. I look for foods with lots of potassium i.e; banana, potatoes, etc... and of course plenty of water :thumbsup:
     
  5. Sep 23, 2016 at 9:36 PM
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    VeganTaco

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    Hi,

    I'm new here and was poking around on the site when I found this post. Running is one of my favorite hobbies! :)

    I would recommend finding a locally owned specialty shoe shop. They will get you on a treadmill and record your gait. This will be the best way to figure out what type of shoe you need based on your foot strike. Plus they will give you tips on how to improve your technique! Things like posture and cadence, which are important for improving performance and reducing injury. A lot of specialty stores even have weekly runs, so you can go run with other people! It's a fun social activity and a great way to learn some tips.

    Personally, I do very minimal stretching pre-run. Maybe 2-3 minutes. The most important thing is a good post-run stretch. This allows the muscles to cool down while keeping the blood flowing, which helps prevent cramps, stiffness and soreness.

    Diet is HUGE and a very important part of overall health! But I think this is long enough for my first post on a truck forum hehe ;)

    The most important thing is to just get out there and run!

    -Erin
     
  6. Sep 23, 2016 at 9:41 PM
    #6
    T-Rex266

    T-Rex266 Moderator Moderator

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    Put a bear behind you. Or the cops if bears aren't your thing.
     
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  7. Oct 3, 2016 at 4:38 PM
    #7
    Barcared

    Barcared Well-Known Member

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    Wow, didn't expect to see this here.

    Stretching before activity is more detrimental. several studies have found reduced performance, specifically reduction in sprint times directly after a stretch. It doesn't mean don't stretch, it means don't stretch before a competition where your time matters. Muscles have an optimal length (like travel on suspension). Stretching confuses the muscles a bit and altering length without the physiological improvement in performance (like a body lift kit vs actual suspension upgrade). This temporarily reduces performance. Stretching right before a run might decrease your 100m sprint time, but unlikely to effect a 5k, 10k or 1/2 to full marathon time. But this is based on small trial studies with equivocal results.

    Running fast has a lot to do with body structure but training for speed has had some small effects on speed of running. The problem is, if you aren't built for speed, sprint training may cause lots of problems. If running causes pain (typically pain in the front of your knee also known as patello femoral pain syndrome or on the outside of your knee also known as illiotibial band syndrome) these are likely attributable to running form. These can range from over striding, rear foot vs fore foot striking, and too narrow of a running width.

    The problem with running is that it is one of the few things we can all do, it's free, and we can do it wrong in so many ways. (I'm a physical therapist that specializes in spinal and lower extremity problems with a PhD in human movement and biomechanics).
     
  8. Oct 4, 2016 at 9:28 PM
    #8
    chilioil.514

    chilioil.514 Well-Known Member

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    It's commonly said that the best way to learn to run is to run in bare feet. You will naturally make contact w the ground w only the ball of your foot. The reason for this is that striking the heel is painful and the spring and power comes from the ball of your foot. Just watch all the elite sprinters and marathon runners. They never heel strike.
     
  9. Nov 2, 2016 at 6:58 PM
    #9
    foxrcing07

    foxrcing07 KO7FOX

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    I run a bit and I echo everyone else's point stretching after works best for me, I have a foam roller I use too, I also wear a compression sleeve on my knee it helps with pain and swelling
     
  10. Nov 2, 2016 at 7:07 PM
    #10
    95 taco

    95 taco Battle Born

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    How long have you been running?

    As mentioned before get fit for shoes, visit a running store and get fit for a shoe, they will analyze your gate, pace, and measure your foot to give a very good and comfortable fit.
    I personally bought one pair of shoes from my local running store (because they invested time and effort into fitting me for a shoe) but the subsequent shoes I bought were online (same model) because they were $80 online and $110 in store.

    This works, if you can't get a bear or officer to cooperate get an aggressive dog to chase you.

    I have to agree with this, my trainer doesn't have us stretch before we work out because of studies that show it can hurt more than it helps.

    However always make sure you cool down and stretch properly, if you don't cool down ad stretch then you will be in a world of hurt.

    Also get some potassium pills if you worry about cramps, and if you don't want to be super sore after a good hard run take some Branch Chain Amino Acids, they help the body heal and almost eliminate soreness.
    https://www.amazon.com/Cellucor-Alp...eywords=BCAA&refinements=p_85:2470955011&th=1
     
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  11. Nov 2, 2016 at 9:38 PM
    #11
    foxrcing07

    foxrcing07 KO7FOX

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    Also depending on the structure of your foot, good insoles make a big difference (my insoles are $50 and last about 2 pairs of shoes or 6months) shoes last about 3 months
     
  12. Nov 3, 2016 at 12:13 AM
    #12
    pinktaco808

    pinktaco808 [OP] Hot Steppa

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  13. Nov 3, 2016 at 12:14 AM
    #13
    pinktaco808

    pinktaco808 [OP] Hot Steppa

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    been running for 3 years now average 5-6 miles a day
     
  14. Nov 3, 2016 at 6:23 AM
    #14
    foxrcing07

    foxrcing07 KO7FOX

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    Does anyone do Fartlek?
    Google it if you don't know
     
  15. Nov 30, 2016 at 10:32 PM
    #15
    pinktaco808

    pinktaco808 [OP] Hot Steppa

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  16. Dec 1, 2016 at 9:58 AM
    #16
    double_b

    double_b Well-Known Member

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    I started running to get back into shape, be fit, healthy, etc at age 41, which was 6 years ago. When I started out I was stretching for 5 minutes or so before and after running. I then saw the reports about stretching being detrimental so I decided to try NOT stretching before I ran. It was better. So I stopped stretching before and felt more comfortable, less nagging pains and such during the runs.

    Then I tried rolling BEFORE and AFTER my runs. Big difference. I use "The Stick" which is a hard plastic roller. I use it on my shins, calves and hamstrings. The biggest difference it made was in my shins. typically my shins would start to burn about a mile in but eventually go away. When I would roll before I ran I never had that burn in my shins. It was 100% consistent too. If I didn't roll I got the burn. I I rolled, no burn.

    Rolling your cold muscles hurts a little at first but you get used to it and it really does make a huge difference.

    I ran a lot when I first got into it. I was running 5Ks, 10Ks, 10 milers.......I loved it.....a lot of it had to do because I was/am fast so the rush of beating people half my age was fun. LOL. I was doing 5Ks in 19:30 range. Then I decided to do a marathon......and while I mostly did the right thing by teaching myself to run slower.....that affected me for almost a year....I had a hard time getting back to running fast for shorter distances.

    I have exercise ADD....I tend to switch around activities which I do believe helps to keep the "want to" fresh. I run, bike, hike, lift weights.

    The above poster mentions Fartleks.......you run a slower pace for a certain distance then a faster pace then back to slower, switching back and forth within the same run. It gets your body use to running under stress, less comfortable conditions at a better pace.

    Best advice I can give is to try rolling your muscles, keep your routine and runs fresh, switch it up and don't be afraid to go to the track one day and do sprints and then the next run do a longer slow run. Don't keep doing the same thing over and over. Challenge yourself, you'll be surprised what the human body can endure......and that leads me into the most important piece of advice.......REST!!!!!! Make sure you give your body time to recover. It really is just as important as exercising. Don't over do it. Seriously.
     
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  17. Dec 10, 2016 at 9:42 PM
    #17
    2K_Taco

    2K_Taco Well-Known Member

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    I mostly cycle, but throw in a short 3-4 miler in about once a week. You can youtube pose jogging which will teach you the mid foot strike. It feels like your taking twice as many steps as the old school heel strike method, but it is much easier on your knees and overall body.

    Also if you want to go a bit faster, you may want to look at lighter shoes. Most pure running shoe companies show the weight in ounces.

    IMO, faster is not always better. Depending on your goals, your #1 priority should be running injury free. Running fast will eventually take a toll on your joints, especially when your an older runner. I run to maintain cardio, leg strength and burn much needed calories...

    Because I'm an older guy, I have been stretching before and after my runs. I feel that my flexibility has gone down with age and I need to stretch to keep my legs limber.

    If your really serious about getting faster, intervals/Hills (Fartlek as mentioned already) should probably be done at least once per week. Trail running usually has some good scenery if you live close to the foothills.

    You can track your splits with your smart phone with various GPS apps, I use Strava. (Or you can get a dedicated device like a Garmin) Get a heart rate monitor too, it's interesting to see the data.
     
  18. Jan 5, 2017 at 5:06 AM
    #18
    salladh

    salladh Well-Known Member

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    Running is one of my most serious hobbies :) nice to see a thread about it.

    Running Tip for hills:
    When running up hills, don't hunch forward. Treat your pelvis like it is a bucket full of water, and try not to spill the water. This will help engage your glutes, instead of relying on quadriceps. It may feel like you are leaning backwards when you first start this form, but this is the proper form and will ultimately help you reach the top faster, and injury free. :)

    My opinion on GPS & strava: I don't use them because I get too involved with the numbers and it ultimately harms me. I rely on how my body is feeling at the moment to determine how hard to push it. When I used to run with GPS I would push it too hard to meet my goals even if my body as pushing back on me, or wouldn't push it hard enough even if i was feeling excellent because I was only trying to meet my numbers.

    Speed work: I see Fartlek mentioned above, and it is great for speed work. should incorporate it into more of my workouts than I currently do. I will work on that!

    Shoes: Lots of conflicting opinions on shoes from the serious runners I know. One of my friends ran a trail 50 miler with the most minimalist shoes I have ever seen (basically just a piece of 1/4th inch rubber strapped to his foot to prevent damage from rocks and roots). He pounds pavement all day in those things and I cant wrap my head around how he never gets injured. I run in Hoka's (big thick cushioned soles with rounded heels) to prevent injury. He keeps telling me that if I was truly strong and had proper form I wouldn't need such an absurd shoe, but I guess I just haven't tapped into his running nirvana yet...
     
  19. Feb 2, 2017 at 6:26 PM
    #19
    toyo522

    toyo522 Lost

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    Could y'all help me out with coming up with a running plan. So here's my situation in the fall I'll be taking a ROTC PT test, I have to run 2 miles in 13 minutes. I just started jogging again last week haven't really ran much since I graduated high school. Right now all I'm doing is light jogs at a 6.5mph till I can get my breathing back and go longer distance. At about 2 miles my left knee starts to hurt injured it years ago not recorded though. Any tips or plans y'all know of for running will really help.
     
  20. Feb 4, 2017 at 6:54 PM
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    sjwhitaker

    sjwhitaker Today Was A Good Day.

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    First and foremost, I'm NOT a running expert. But I was in the Army for 8 years and took more PT tests than I care to remember. Prep wise, well once you get to your goal you will need to maintain it. Company and platoon/squad PT will help alot. The single best thing I did to improve my 2 mile was sprints and 30/1:20's. Sprint the 30 seconds as hard as you can push yourself the slow to a 8 minute pace to cool down. Repeat this until you complete your distance (I always shot for 2.5 miles, made me less weary of the 2 mile PT test). Do that twice a week and you will be impressed with the results. Again, I'm no running expert but I never had an issue with the 2 mile at all and averaged a 280-290 pt score. Good luck!
     
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