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Taking a Tacoma around the world,need advice

Discussion in '3rd Gen. Tacomas (2016+)' started by Round the world, Jan 4, 2019.

  1. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:02 PM
    #1
    Round the world

    Round the world [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Hi people, this is my first thread so please bear with me. My wife and I are retiring next year (haven’t told our bosses yet!) and will be driving our newly purchased 2019 bright white Tacoma 4*4 AC LB MT sport around the world and need your thoughts/advice about how to modify it for us to make it! I’m thinking it will take us 3 years or so. I’m thinking our route will be about 80,000 miles made up of 25% decent pavement, 10% pavement with huge potholes, 40% washboardy graveled roads, 25% deep sandy/very muddy tracks. I am resigned to realizing that the truck will be over it’s GVWR, possibly with the payload of 1,800 pounds, fully loaded. But since we will be retired, driving will be done at moderate speed. I’d like to be able to drive over washboardy/corrugated roads with comfort. We chose a Tacoma due to it having a very similar width to the Hilux and will fit down the same tracks. We purchased a new one because of the lack of parts outside North America.

    Here’s my thoughts thanks to reading tons of TW and Expedition Portal threads:

    Pop-up camper either a Four Wheel Camper Fleet, Earthcruiser GZL, All Terrain Camper Bobcat, or a XP Camper V2
    Depending on camper config we’d use an aluminum flatbed possibly a UTE with 2 underbody boxes
    Front and rear ARB air lockers & regearing with 4.88
    CBI aluminum T3 or Aluminess bumper; trying for lightweight
    2.5” King or Fox reservoir shocks with either Alcan or Deaver custom rear springs
    ARB or Safari Snorkel
    ARB on-board compressor
    ARB diff breathers
    Front skid plate - CBI aluminum
    Winch – Warn zeon 10 s
    Tires – 285-70-17 load range E, BFG KO2
    20” light bar on the bumper
    33 gallon LRA replacement fuel tank - adding 6 more gallons under the flatbed - for a planned 600 mile range

    I welcome all ideas. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  2. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:05 PM
    #2
    El Duderino

    El Duderino Howzit \000/

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    Stuff, things, this, an ADS
    Shit sounds awesome please stick around and post pics
     
  3. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:14 PM
    #3
    Shellshock

    Shellshock Guy who drives a lot

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    I've been going back and forth on the build out of my truck and I'm going as light as possible while still having what I need. Its real easy to load these trucks up with weight and then pretty soon your fuel economy is gone and you start having issues due to weight.

    You can plan on not driving at night, but odds are there's going to be some unexpected night driving. I'm running a 30" rigid SR in the bumper and 2 rigid dually SS ditch lights. It makes a huge difference and puts out an incredible amount of light. You'll be thankful you have them when the time comes, trust me.

    With the build you are looking at, I'd pull the stock tank and replace it with a 34 gallon long range automotive tank and keep two jerry cans. That'll give you 44 gallons of fuel.

    12v fridge / freezer is a necessity
     
  4. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:14 PM
    #4
    BlakeM

    BlakeM Well-Known Member

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    Have you considered a dual battery system?


    Also, I’m jealous. Please start a trip report thread!
     
  5. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:15 PM
    #5
    hiPSI

    hiPSI Laminar Flow

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    Welcome to TW.
    No matter what you do, do not mod any electrical. That is the biggest mod problem. Leave it OEM. Your vehicle in it's stock configuration is at it's most reliable and durable. Put some E tires on it and drive around the world.
    Good luck and have fun

    BTW, how many miles do you have on it off road?
    You would be surprised how good it is in stock form.
    Lastly, get off this forum and go to expedition portal. Those guys are much more knowledgable about your needs than we are. Those guys do this stuff.
     
  6. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:47 PM
    #6
    Round the world

    Round the world [OP] Well-Known Member

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    Good thoughts about more lights. Driving at night sucks in the 3rd world, damn near hit a cow on my one night of night driving in Botswana this fall.

    Batteries - the camper will have 2 deep cycle batteries, not counting the trucks OEM.

    Does your warning about not modifying the electrical include not installing two batteries?

    I have not taken my new truck out off road. I did have a slightly modified Hilux in Botswana that got stuck three times in deep sand. Ive been a professional forester for 35 years I’ve driven in lots of condtions. Being in a national park there, I realized I was not top of the food chain anymore, getting out of your rig can be scary. I realize that having two locker differentials is important.

    Yes, I have checked out expedition portal. Was hoping though TW is the place to get advice for modifying the truck itself.

    If I can figure out how I will set up a build site. We will also have a blog site at some point
     
  7. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:49 PM
    #7
    Bertw192

    Bertw192 Well-Known Member

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    Katzkins, sport hood, T4R TRD Pro Graphite wheels with BFG KO2 265/70/17 tires, Voodoo Hi-Rise cross bars, tinted windows, Mesojdm OR taillights, TRD Pro skid plate, TRD Pro Fox Suspension, TRD Pro shift knob, TRD Pro Rigid fog lights, TRD Pro grille, passenger smart handle, SSO Slimline bumper with Warn M8000 synthetic winch, TC bed stiffeners
    Check out @Hodakaguy and his father's build page. His rig sounds about right for the conditions you have planned.
     
  8. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:53 PM
    #8
    Bertw192

    Bertw192 Well-Known Member

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    Katzkins, sport hood, T4R TRD Pro Graphite wheels with BFG KO2 265/70/17 tires, Voodoo Hi-Rise cross bars, tinted windows, Mesojdm OR taillights, TRD Pro skid plate, TRD Pro Fox Suspension, TRD Pro shift knob, TRD Pro Rigid fog lights, TRD Pro grille, passenger smart handle, SSO Slimline bumper with Warn M8000 synthetic winch, TC bed stiffeners
    Also, based on the added weight, an 8000 lb winch may be too small.
     
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  9. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:55 PM
    #9
    Shellshock

    Shellshock Guy who drives a lot

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    Adding electrical is fine but you want to make sure you can easily isolate it. For example I have everything into a switch pro and I can disconnect that and all my accessories are disconnected in the event gremlins pop up. When you goto multi batteries you want to have some way to easily isolate the systems.
     
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  10. Jan 4, 2019 at 10:55 PM
    #10
    Shellshock

    Shellshock Guy who drives a lot

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    Agreed. You probably want at least a 10s
     
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  11. Jan 4, 2019 at 11:01 PM
    #11
    Itchyfeet

    Itchyfeet No Durians

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    I'd sell it and find a Nissan Frontier. I'd be worried about parts support if you're going to travel the world
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2019
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  12. Jan 4, 2019 at 11:20 PM
    #12
    Stocklocker

    Stocklocker Well-Known Member

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    Two tanks is a good idea in a remote area in case you puncture one tank, or get a slug of water or contaminated fuel in one tank.
     
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  13. Jan 4, 2019 at 11:22 PM
    #13
    Hijynx

    Hijynx Well-Known Member

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    that sounds like a lifetime adventure! I wouldn't do it in a tacoma. I would do it in a diesel fueled rig. diesel is easier to find than gasoline in remote areas.
     
  14. Jan 4, 2019 at 11:28 PM
    #14
    KillerSeabass

    KillerSeabass Well-Known Member

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    In theory I’m a huge fan of the dual battery set up (with an isolator) ... @hiPSI why do you suggest not messing with the electrically on a 3rd gen?

     
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  15. Jan 4, 2019 at 11:29 PM
    #15
    Stocklocker

    Stocklocker Well-Known Member

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    I think the idea is a good one. I would keep the truck as simple and lightweight as possible, and keep it somewhat low key with some generic parts that could be substituted for locally available equivalents if they break. For example, don’t change your rear shock mounts so they only work with a proprietary shock.

    Myself, for this kind of trip, I would not go with 33”s (285s). I think the smoother ride, greater torque, and higher efficiency of a 31” Tire would pay dividends beyond the additional 1” ground clearance offered by a 33”.

    I would see if a local Toyota Dealer would sponsor your travels and offer parts support.
     
  16. Jan 4, 2019 at 11:35 PM
    #16
    Stocklocker

    Stocklocker Well-Known Member

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    Basically 90% of all untrained people and 75% of “trained” people do crappy electrical mods and have no idea what they are doing. They construct systems that work in the short-term, but are not properly installed to prevent chafing, overloads, ensure waterproofness, and achieve other reliability factors like the OEM Toyota electrical systems are.

    As an electrician, I can tell you that your neighbor talks a good talk, but has no idea what he’s doing.

    Funny story:
    I took my Work truck in to have an aluminum canopy fitted that had interior lighting. I took it to a national chain, that guaranteed a top-quality install. Two days later the lights went out because their “professional automotive technician” had strapped the canopy lighting circuit wiring to the exhaust manifold heat shield and it finally burned through. I digress......
     
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  17. Jan 4, 2019 at 11:42 PM
    #17
    hiPSI

    hiPSI Laminar Flow

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    Simply, people suck at them. Dual battery mod is a great mod... if done correctly. Correctly does not mean a Saturday and a six pack in the driveway. It means an EE and tech drawing up a competent design and bill of material, with a tech (EE tech, not automotive) supervising the install.
    Now, can the accountant in the driveway drinking beer on a Saturday install a dual battery setup? Sure. Would I trust my life with it? Nope.
    Electrical mods are the mods that statistically fail the most and most likely to leave you stranded.
     
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  18. Jan 5, 2019 at 1:32 AM
    #18
    stun gun

    stun gun Squad designated shitposter

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    Pen pal us. You’re a hero.
     
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  19. Jan 5, 2019 at 5:30 AM
    #19
    Burro09

    Burro09 Well-Known Member

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    I hope I can do this type of trip one day.
    But I wouldnt do it in my tacoma. Parts being the main reason, Then hi high techness of the truck being a second. Bad gas with a DI system, Electronic 4x4 actuators etc etc.... Also it might stick out like sore thumb someplace else.

    I would probably do this in something like a weathered looking but mechanicallyq sound landcruiser 80. Pretty sure those can be fixed with a hammer and a screedriver and parts for those sold all over the world. Just me opinion.

    Good luck regardless! Really eager to see how a taco would fare this type of expedition! They are probabaly tougher than many people think.
     
  20. Jan 5, 2019 at 5:39 AM
    #20
    boynoyce

    boynoyce .

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    Interesting thread.

    I won't comment about modding a Tacoma, but some off the cuff comments.

    Sounds like you have international experience, so wondering why not get a vehicle with a more "international pedigree"?

    An all enclosed vehicle will be more secure- a pickup truck leaves your possessions more exposed.

    Diesel fuel is probably easier to get everywhere except North America.

    Having to drive from point A to point B might take you through places you would rather not be- there are places in the world where it is better to blend in, driving a vehicle only sold in North America will make that difficult.

    Good luck though, sounds like a real adventure!

    Edit: looks like @Burro09 beat me to it
     

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