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Thoughts on this bow, for a first

Discussion in 'Guns & Hunting' started by Rujack, May 3, 2019.

  1. May 3, 2019 at 9:41 PM
    #1
    Rujack

    Rujack [OP] Stop Global Whining

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    I know nothing about archery but I’ve been wanting to try it out and wonder what you all might have to say about this bow:

    Samick Sage Takedown Recurve Bow 35lb https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006R8SWUO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_owrZCbGGR0165

    Just looking to shoot still targets for now at a nearby range and on camping trips. My neighbor has a similar 30lb bow (same brand but 54”) and it felt alright, but I think I’ll bump up to 35. Is that uncommonly light for a beginner? Wondering if I should go up to 40 or even more.

    Also looking for something to get my almost 5 yo boy going. He does a little at his preschool and his instructor says he doing really well with it.

    I know I could go to a brick and mortar store to get sized etc, but I just won’t have time to do that in the next couple weeks at best.
     
  2. May 4, 2019 at 2:51 AM
    #2
    PacoDevo

    PacoDevo Well-Known Member

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    Bought my son a Parker sidekick a while back.....interchangeable limbs adjust from 20-29, 30-39, 40-49 pounds, I think. So it can be used for legal hunting in some/most states?? Forget the draw lengths...starts around 18" maybe and goes up to around 30??

    Anyway, he was able to 'grow with it' instead of buying a new bow each time he outgrew the current set up. $50 for each extra set of limbs and the cost at an archery shop to install/readjust (under $50 each time) was well under the cost of a new bow - twice!!

    He hasn't shot it in a few years now as he is just finishing his junior year of college and his priorities have changed.

    If he were to never shoot it again, it can be put back to the 'first stage' lightest limbs and shortest draw length for another new, young shooter to use. Or he can hunt with it in its current set up.
     
    wilcam47 and Brake Weight like this.
  3. May 4, 2019 at 5:11 AM
    #3
    Georgia Native

    Georgia Native Well-Known Member

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    Shoot what feels good. 35 is a good starting point. A lot of beginners go too heavy at the expense of good form and technique. 35 is good for small game. I consider 45 a minimum for big game. Check your hunting regs. No reason spend a lot of money. My best recurve is my cheapest (130).
    As far as your kid, my kids (4 and 9) shoot simple fiberglass youth bows. They're great. Cheap, fun to shoot, and indestructible. I have no problem turning them loose with them. I keep a bunch of cheap arrows around and they shoot whenever they want. Good luck.

    https://www.amazon.com/Bear-Archery...bear+kids+bow&qid=1556970567&s=gateway&sr=8-3
     
  4. May 4, 2019 at 9:33 AM
    #4
    Rujack

    Rujack [OP] Stop Global Whining

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    Good tips, I’ll keep this one at 35lbs.

    I just ordered (from Germany) this one for my son

    https://shop.robinhoodarchery.eu/product/kids-recurve-set/

    I researched for an hour or so and liked it best out of what I saw.

    What kind of quiver should I get? Hip or shoulder? I think I’d prefer the shoulder type bc I don’t like things bouncing around my legs. So if I get a shoulder one, leather or synthetic? The synthetic type seems less bulky and easier to pack. And more comfortable.
     
  5. May 4, 2019 at 11:58 AM
    #5
    PacoDevo

    PacoDevo Well-Known Member

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    For target shooting, I have a tripod quiver - two legs and the quiver, stands up like a tripod - free standing. Used to use a hip quiver for targets and still have it. Never used an over the shoulder one. As was said earlier......whatever you are comfortable with. It just holds the arrows, doesn't need to be leather.

    Archery can get VERY expensive VERY quickly!!!!! Bow, rest, sight, stabilizer, silencers, arrows, quiver, release can easily add up to $1,000-2,000 or more very quickly. Forgot the target(s)!!!! Practice points, broadheads, scale, bow press, club membership(s).........
     
  6. May 4, 2019 at 12:17 PM
    #6
    Georgia Native

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    That is a cool kid's bow. If I am target shooting, I don't use a quiver. I just stick them in the ground. If I am hunting, I use a quiver that attaches to my bow.
     
  7. May 6, 2019 at 2:17 PM
    #7
    Rujack

    Rujack [OP] Stop Global Whining

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  8. May 6, 2019 at 4:54 PM
    #8
    Georgia Native

    Georgia Native Well-Known Member

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