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Tire Chains

Discussion in 'Wheels & Tires' started by TheMaster, Dec 9, 2006.

  1. Dec 9, 2006 at 5:05 PM
    #1
    TheMaster

    TheMaster [OP] Born to Ride Thor

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    Anybody here have experience with tire chains? 07 Tacoma owners manual (page 379) says “do not use tire chains on front tires”. Why not? Aren’t chains on all 4 wheels better that on just two? What’s the best chain’s to buy. Still need out. :ballchain:
     
  2. Dec 10, 2006 at 7:09 PM
    #2
    99taco3150

    99taco3150 Member

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    I drive a 99 which is entirely different but I have used chains on all four tires many a time. I have never experienced a problem. Hope that helps
     
  3. Dec 10, 2006 at 7:57 PM
    #3
    Mat-taco06

    Mat-taco06 2006 Double cab TRD Sprot

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    When I got my Taco, the dealer told me if I was planning to take it the snow to use Tire cables not chains. Bc they said it could damage the under body of the truck and Bc of the warranty. Just thought I should say this incase anyone did not know.
     
  4. Dec 11, 2006 at 5:01 AM
    #4
    TheMaster

    TheMaster [OP] Born to Ride Thor

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    Yeah, I read something to that tune in the owner’s manual. But how can that happen if it’s secured to the tires :confused: . There’s plenty of room between the tire and underbody. Just trying to brainstorm here guys, so jump in.
     
  5. Dec 11, 2006 at 10:04 AM
    #5
    Bud

    Bud Member

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    I used to work way up in northern alberta deep in the bush for an oil and gas company. We used tire chains many many times and they usually got us to where we needed to go. But usually more trouble than they're worth. Through the mud and the snow where there are really no roads to speak off. More than a few times we have worn large holes right through the wheel wells into the truck box from broken chains or loose links. Sometimes the chains will slip off and get twisted around the axles. The hours that we used to spend laying in the mud or snow installing or removing chains and usually the frustration of trying to make them fit properly so that they wouldn't fall apart in the first place can be mind boggling. Current I live in southern Alberta and use strickly winter tires in snow and mud. I have no problems getting around in any of the crap that's out there and move around pretty good in the deep stuff up in the mountains. The winter tires are quite on the highway and wear well. I would never ever use another set of chains again especially on my Taco Bus.
     
  6. Dec 12, 2006 at 5:46 AM
    #6
    TheMaster

    TheMaster [OP] Born to Ride Thor

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    All I need tire chains are to climb one steep snow packed hill :evil: every Sunday evening. I’ll take them off after the climb otherwise, I have a long trek down hill and back up hill to unload the truck every weekend sometimes with heavy tools and building material. It’s a pain in the donkey. I dread the day I have chain’s wrapped around my axles. Since my climb is only about 150 feet, I’m willing to take a chance with the chains since snow tires will not make this hill. Appreciate your valuable input though.
     
  7. Dec 12, 2006 at 11:57 AM
    #7
    gdawg25

    gdawg25 Zoom-Zoom

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    Chains should only be used on the drive wheels. If your Taco is 2WD then you only need chains on the rear, and if it is 4WD then I dont see the point. I thought tire chains were only for Americans anyways? LOL, jk.
     
  8. Dec 12, 2006 at 2:28 PM
    #8
    TheMaster

    TheMaster [OP] Born to Ride Thor

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    I’ve recently done some research on tire chains (snow chains). The experts recommend chains on all four wheels contrary to what Toyota recommends. The four wheel theory makes sense from all the tests reports I’ve reviewed. It’s similar to installing four winter tires on all four wheels vs. on just two wheels. Snow chains on only the back of RWD vehicles will not have steering traction. Similarly, chains only on the front on FWD will spin the car around on aggressive braking hence all four or none is recommended. Most American's wouldn't know what a tire chain is so stop poking fun at your people. ;)
     
  9. Dec 12, 2006 at 4:33 PM
    #9
    gdawg25

    gdawg25 Zoom-Zoom

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    I aint no American! haha.
     
  10. Dec 13, 2006 at 6:00 AM
    #10
    TheMaster

    TheMaster [OP] Born to Ride Thor

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    D'OH...Stupid ice. I always knew I'll get stuck in something. "Homer Simpson"
     
  11. Dec 14, 2006 at 3:05 PM
    #11
    Ldytaco05

    Ldytaco05 it's all about me

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    what a predicament you're in how does this affect your truck in the long run? do you have to align them every time you switch to those kinds of tires? just wanting to educate myself in case i per say drive up to snowy conditions :0)
     
  12. Dec 16, 2006 at 3:55 PM
    #12
    TheMaster

    TheMaster [OP] Born to Ride Thor

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    Tire chains best used on all four wheels. Check this out; http://www.4x4abc.com/jeep101/chains.html
     
  13. Nov 21, 2010 at 3:22 PM
    #13
    SlimDigg

    SlimDigg Resident MMA Fanatic

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    Since this thread had the best info regarding whether to chain front or back axle, i'm bringing it back from the dead!

    Can I get some tire chain recommedations?
     
  14. Nov 21, 2010 at 4:03 PM
    #14
    BakoTruck

    BakoTruck Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'm not sure how it's going to help anyone out with only chains on the front w/ a 2x4. I can understand how it's going to help with braking and steering, but you're only going to spin the rear tires and go nowhere. But you're talking about chains on all 4 tires with a 2x4.

    I have used them on the rear only with my 2x4, and didn't need them for the front at all. If you have 2 sets of chains.....yes you could put them on all 4, It will be better, but probably isn't needed.
    But just make sure it will clear your brake line or anything else.

    I used mine only on the rear going up and down a mountain to my Parents cabin 9,500 ft. Worked great, no issues with braking or steering control.

    You could get 2 sets, and if you need to put them on the front, do it. Other than that, always start off with chains on the rear.
    Watch out for that 'black ice' too, chains in the front will help a lot with that.
    Have a good one.
     
  15. Nov 30, 2010 at 6:30 PM
    #15
    Leech

    Leech New Member

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    Ok...Current body style Tacoma

    I have both a 2009 sport 4dr that I have EXTENSIVE snow driving experience in and a 2011 2dr reg cab for my service guys.

    DO NOT chain the front tires as the manual says...this is why... Take your hand over the top of your stock tires and reach around palm to tread and fingers at the back inner wall of the tire where it bubbles out some....now travel the diameter of the tire like this...at about 12:00 you will feel something hit the TOP of your fingers. about enough clearance for my little finger but that's it. Mind you I just put new Michellen tires on and the clearance is the same as the stock tire of the same size (I know, go figure right?)

    IF you put chains on the front, CABLE or CHAIN styles, you will have them hitting that nub off the suspension arm that comes down and it will snap them. this sends them wrapping into your suspension or against the body and out into the road. I have gone through two sets of cables and the chains just cant function at all. I can get about 1-6 miles before they come off. Even if you use a bungy/clip style set on the front of the cables it will still be in the range where that arm nub hits and you will have problems. They just cant be tightened to the front enough to pull them far enough off that bubble. maybe if you jack it and spend an hour idk. lol. yeah right

    Chain or cable the back and be happy. If you are having problems with the front I would personally start by taking a little air out of the front tires. If that doesn't work then fill them back up, put those cables on, and plan on only getting a few miles before those cables come off and possibly damage your paint, suspension, and void that warranty.

    I have spoke about this with several Toyota reps and they confirm.

    if you REALLY want chains on the front then you need to go get a set of those new clamp style chains that only clamp over the front face of the tire and the tread but not around the back. They run around $500 here in WA.

    Just stick with cables or chains in the back though... You should be fine unless you are in insane conditions as I like to play in.

    on a side note 2 yrs ago hard snow fall...24 autos, 1 unloaded semi, and 6 fork lifts helped out with my Toyota in 1 week. I need to start charging for this crap :p Looking forward to this winter as its supposed to be bad!
     
  16. Nov 30, 2010 at 6:34 PM
    #16
    Leech

    Leech New Member

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    oh..and put some sand in the back after you chain the back of that 2wd reg cap for heavens sake. I laugh every time I see a guy with chains in the hills of Seattle still having problems.

    I also use 200+ pounds of sand or hardened concrete in my 2wd reg cap or the front of my 69 VW baja for similar problems but with steering.

    Best wishes...don't be the guy in the ditch!
     
  17. Nov 30, 2010 at 6:47 PM
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    Snoyota

    Snoyota Well-Known Member

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    I have a 07 dbl cab 4x4, I use chains on my rear tires only when in dire situations when I am really stuck in deep snow or on ice. I know the stealership says to use cables, but IMHO cables are terrible and break way to easily. They cant tell if you use cables or chains anyways. Chains should only be used on front wheel drive or all wheel drive vehicles. Not on 4x4s or rear wheel drive trucks
     
  18. Dec 23, 2010 at 11:47 PM
    #18
    TimsToy2011

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    New to site/Taco... In prep for a trip to Mammoth in a few weeks, I DID buy chains for the rear of my double-cab, long bed 4x4 (Wal-Mart didn't have cables to fit my Taco). Am I safe using them, despite the manuals admonition against chains, saying to use cables instead? The chains seem very low profile...thin, flat links, diamond-style, integrated automatic tensioner.
     
  19. Dec 31, 2010 at 6:16 PM
    #19
    JustMe

    JustMe Active Member

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    Yes , You can use chains on the rear, page 202 in my 2009 tacoma manual has all the info about using chains. Read your manual, chain info might not be on page 202 but it's in there.
     
  20. Nov 30, 2011 at 11:56 PM
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    BURL

    BURL New Member

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    I made the mistake of thinking I was smarter than the owners manual...twice! After putting cable type chains on the front wheels on during a Lassen National Park snow storm the cables promptly broke and I have scarred wheel wells to prove it. Two years later (assuming it was the cable-type chains) I put heavy duty chains on the front and while they didn't break, they made ridiculous noise and vibrations and I had to take them off and put them on the rear where, surprise surprise, they didn't make any noise. The "nub" in the front wheel well is for real!
    On a side note, with decent tires and 4wd you drive just fine in most conditions but most states will make you chain up under certain conditions unless you have beefy snow tires so throw them on the rear wheels, drive safe and be happy.
     
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