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Tire Pressure Sensors

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Will Ennis, Mar 14, 2021.

  1. Mar 14, 2021 at 10:21 AM
    #1
    Will Ennis

    Will Ennis [OP] New Member

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    I have a 2013 TRD Sport but swapped wheels and tires with someone who had a Texas edition. Now my tire sensor light is on and the pressure is fine. Is this a CPU thing or can I just find the sensors online and have them swapped out?
     
  2. Mar 14, 2021 at 10:39 AM
    #2
    rphillips

    rphillips Well-Known Member

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    I'd guess they just will need reprogramming. Owners manual shows how you can reprogram for different tire pressure. Or a (Honest) tire shop can reprogram if your Taco needs to be programmed for these sensors. Been there, done that.
     
  3. Mar 14, 2021 at 10:57 AM
    #3
    Muddinfun

    Muddinfun Well-Known Member

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    Here's how it works. The sensors are 1 way communication. The truck listens to the information being sent to it by the sensors. The truck only listens to sensors it's been programmed to listen to. Let's call them Bob, Jake, Johnny, and Rafael. So, each sensor tells the truck what pressure is in the tire. Let's say they're all at 32. When you push the button, the truck learns that 32 is normal pressure and keeps the light off. Now, 1 morning Johnny is on a bad hangover and tells the truck he's only at 25PSI. The truck turns on the light to let you know. You give Johnny some pepto bismal(air), the truck is happy and turns out the light. On your way to work, there's a Tacoma beside you at the light with a low tire. That sensor is named Brittany. Your trucks light doesn't come on because your truck doesn't listen to Brittany.

    So, when you get new sensors, there's 2 ways to make the truck happy.
    1. Pull new OEM or aftermarket OEM type sensors off the shelf and program the truck to listen to them. Now thetruck only listens to George, Paul, John, and Ringo. This programming can only be done by plugging into the truck OBD2 connector.

    2. There are aftermarket sensors thathave no name. It's like adopting a puppy at the shelter. Your dog Bob crosses over the rainbow bridge. You go to the shelter and adopt a new puppy and name himBob. (The tire shop programs the nameless sensor to say, "Hi, my name is Bob") Now your truck still listens to Bob. Your truck isn't smart enough to realize it's a different Bob. He thinks it's the same old Bob, and is content andpatiently waiting for Bob to go on adrinking binge.
     
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  4. Mar 14, 2021 at 1:09 PM
    #4
    Knute

    Knute Well-Known Member

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    Well.....that sure muddled things up.

    Your truck needs to be programed to recognize the Texas sensors. Do you have the codes from the sensors in the Texas tires?

    A local tire store could set you up for a fee to program the truck.
     
  5. Mar 14, 2021 at 1:15 PM
    #5
    vssman

    vssman Rocket Engineer

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    ^^^ this.

    To complicate it further, if you take 3rd gen sensors and try them on 2nd gen it won’t work because they are on different frequencies. Akin to trying to have the truck understand what Roberto, Joao, Raul, Miguel are saying when it doesn’t speak that language.
     
    Muddinfun likes this.
  6. Mar 14, 2021 at 2:45 PM
    #6
    Marshall R

    Marshall R Well-Known Member

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    Your truck is 8 years old. Sensors typically last 7-10 years although they sometimes last longer. If the new wheels and tires are newer than 8 years old you may be fine for a while longer. But if the wheels are 2013 or older chances are good you'll need new sensors before you wear out the next set of tires. You can buy new sensors off Amazon for about $20 each. If you have them installed with new tires there is no additional cost. If you have them installed with existing tires most tire shops will charge about $10 each.

    It wouldn't hurt to go ahead and buy new sensors if they're over about 7-8 years old. Especially if the tire store is going to charge you to relearn them anyway.

    Amazon.com: MORESENSOR Signature Series 315MHz TPMS Tire Pressure Sensor 4-Pack | Preprogrammed for Select 270+ Japanese Brand Models | Replacement for 42607-33011 | Clamp-in | NX-S008-4-TOY: Automotive
     
  7. Mar 14, 2021 at 6:06 PM
    #7
    Steve721

    Steve721 Well-Known Member

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    That was the first I had heard of sensors coming from a 3rd gen truck and putting them into a 2nd gen truck being a problem.
     

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