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Towing over 6k lbs with a 2017

Discussion in 'Towing' started by DenvCamp, Dec 6, 2017 at 6:03 PM.

  1. Dec 6, 2017 at 6:03 PM
    #1
    DenvCamp

    DenvCamp [OP] New Member

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    Relatively new Tacoma owner here. I have been diving deep into the forum here about towing in a 3rd gen Tacoma. I have a questions due to my overall newness to owning a truck in general (previously owned a 2014 4Runner).

    I own a 2017 TRD Sport with tow package. The max amount states 6,700 on brochure. I was wondering what experience have you all had around pushing it over 6k lbs. I am currently in a lease with it, because I am eyeing a 2020 Tundra (with the hopes of a redesign). That said, the reason I am asking about towing something over 6k lbs is because I don’t want to have to repurchase another trailer for camping when I get out of my lease. I reside in Colorado and intend on camping in the mountains several times during summer.

    Thanks in advance and sorry if I couldn’t find an older thread with the answer to this.
     
  2. Dec 6, 2017 at 6:09 PM
    #2
    Garyji

    Garyji Well-Known Member

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    6K plus in Colorado. I'd say get the Tundra. The Taco may do it, but you won't be happy.

    G.
     
  3. Dec 6, 2017 at 6:20 PM
    #3
    crisanalex

    crisanalex Well-Known Member

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    As long as you don't mind the sound of that 3.5 screaming at you should be fine.
     
  4. Dec 6, 2017 at 6:48 PM
    #4
    daddy_o

    daddy_o Well-Known Member

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    Of course there is a fudge factor built into the tow rating, and that is to protect Toyota. They are not going to rate it at the max. On that note, that rating is within reason for safety factors, so will the Taco tow 6700 lbs safely, sure it will, but here is where things come into play on your end.

    1. How much towing experience do you have?
    2. Will said camper have trailer brakes, and if so will you have a brake controller installed on the truck?
    3. Not only do you calculate the trailer weight, but you must consider gear in the trailer, as well as in the truck plus passengers.
    4. Consider distance and terrain you will be towing. Colorado you will be putting a lot of strain on the Taco, and definitely coming down steep slopes can be sketchy at best.
    5. The design of the camper will have a lot do with how it will catch cross winds, be aware that a wind gust against the camper can throw your whole set up on its side.
    6. Since it is a lease, better check your policies (both lease agreement and insurance) to see if there are any clauses on using the vehicle for towing.
    (I´m not saying there will be, I am just throwing it out there for something to look for, you never know).
    7. If you know you will be getting a bigger truck in a couple years, can you go camping with friends or borrow someones camper or even full size truck and get the set up you really want in 2020 when you have the right truck?

    Just a few things to think about, because getting close to the max suggested capacity can cause a lot of headache on you and your truck. I know you said the truck is a lease so long term reliability may not be your top priority, however, you still want to operate the truck in a safe and responsible manner while in your possession.
     
    Garyji and Bowers86 like this.
  5. Dec 7, 2017 at 3:54 AM
    #5
    airsavage

    airsavage Well-Known Member

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    You will be working that taco like a mule. You need less camper or more truck
     
  6. Dec 7, 2017 at 3:57 AM
    #6
    Iamraiderpower

    Iamraiderpower I see snowflakes...

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    This.
    /end thread
     
  7. Dec 8, 2017 at 9:33 AM
    #7
    fattony16

    fattony16 Member

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    Get a brake controller if your going to tow heavy. Brakes are good but they wont last long if they dont have help.
     
  8. Dec 9, 2017 at 5:18 PM
    #8
    Sprig

    Sprig Active Member

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    What exactly are you towing and what is its dry weight?
     
  9. Dec 9, 2017 at 5:32 PM
    #9
    Marshall R

    Marshall R Well-Known Member

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    It'll pull it, but most likely your suspension will be over loaded. The tongue weight of a 6000 lb trailer is almost 800 lbs. You'll need a weight distribution hitch with loads that heavy and that adds another 100 lbs on the tongue. My truck has a payload of 1200 lbs. I weigh 220. That leaves me less than 100 lbs in the truck for other passengers and gear. You may weigh less and your truck may have more payload. But a 6000 lb trailer is cutting it close regardless.

    You CAN modify the suspension to get the truck to ride level and take some of the bounce out of it. But that doesn't solve the real problem. When too much weight is on the rear of the truck, especially the hitch, weight is taken off the front axle. Think of is as a see/saw. You never get enough weight to actually lift the front wheels off the ground, but there is enough weight taken off them to negatively effect braking and steering. Modifying the suspension does nothing to add weight to the front axle.

    Realistically these trucks are best towing something 4000-4500 lbs, maybe 5000, regardless of the listed tow ratings. This is the case with all trucks. Even 1/2 and 3/4 ton trucks will rarely actually tow the amount listed, and for the same reason.
     
  10. Dec 10, 2017 at 7:49 AM
    #10
    Sprig

    Sprig Active Member

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    Off road lights, aux backup lights, bull bar, Lear camper shell, camo seat covers, nerf bars
    The OP states over 6000 lbs. That’s why I asked exactly how much it weighs dry and what exactly it is. If it’s over 6000 lbs dry then when he loads it with equipment, water, full propane tanks , clothes, food etc. etc. he will exceed the max tow weight. If that is the case then he should not tow it at all!! End of discussion. Also With tongue weight of the trailer, passengers and stuff in the bed of the truck he may also exceed gross vehicle weight, gross axle weight and gross payload weight. This is all bad, bad, bad.

    If the weight comes close to the maximums but doesn’t exceed it then I say tow it but just pray he makes it to the end of his lease without some major failure. Doesn’t make sense to me why someone would buy/lease a truck knowing it may not be or isn’t adequate to tow a trailer he already has. Towing in the mountains of Colorado and in the summer heat with that truck and trailer combo will more than likely cause failure to some components of the drive train or suspension. If he is exceeding the manufactures max weight ratings then if he has an accident his liability will be greater, he’ll be screwed.
     
    Garyji likes this.

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