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Tread Life Factory Goodyear Wranglers?

Discussion in '3rd Gen. Tacomas (2016+)' started by TheCracker, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. Jan 19, 2018 at 10:05 PM
    #21
    mauidogg

    mauidogg Well-Known Member

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    Interesting how much variation in tread wear. Maybe good if everyone could put all info in one place to do comparison. Like vehicle weight, driving style, surfaces ( highway/off-road) etc. like around here if you drive on lava rock brand new don’t last a day if you spin the tires at all, but that’s to be expected. My personal experience is 90% hwy driving, off-road is mostly dirt. I am 30k and they don’t look like they will make it much past 45k. I drive like a old person so very disappointed in wear. Although like someone else said OEM tires don’t seem to last long nowadays. My wife’s Honda Pilot need new tires sooner than expected but we often have that vehicle loaded with kids and gear.
     
  2. Jan 20, 2018 at 7:07 AM
    #22
    cotaco05

    cotaco05 Well-Known Member

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    The stock Wranglers do terrible in the snow I've experienced so far, so I'm changing them out for Michelins. Other than that, I have nothing bad to say about them, but I've only got 8k miles on them. They did better than expected on the trails I've taken and are a decent highway tire. Wish they were better at snow!

    I do think OEM tires should be considered "replicas" of actual tires. When doing my research, I found the weight at 25 lbs per tire for our stock Wranglers, while any other P rated tire of similar size weighed between 38-42 lbs
     
  3. Jan 20, 2018 at 9:51 AM
    #23
    mauidogg

    mauidogg Well-Known Member

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    25 lbs per tire? Sounds very light. Where is that info from?
     
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  4. Jan 20, 2018 at 2:07 PM
    #24
    cotaco05

    cotaco05 Well-Known Member

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    I thought the same thing, found that info on Discount Tire's website.
     
  5. Jan 21, 2018 at 6:10 AM
    #25
    Dorag

    Dorag Do Rag

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    At 29k had to replace, they hydroplaned with just a light rain.
     
  6. Jan 21, 2018 at 6:15 AM
    #26
    Dirtridercrf250

    Dirtridercrf250 3rd Genner

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    Got a flat at like 3k miles plugged that then blew a side wall around 12k off road. The passenger loaf rating suck these trucks need at least a load c. Anyways 265/75/16 ko2 no complaints
     
  7. Jan 21, 2018 at 7:13 AM
    #27
    islandstyle

    islandstyle Active Member

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    far left coast
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    legal front window tint, not so on the rears..
    I only got 21k out of them.Replaced them with e rated Nitto's TG MT.
     
  8. Jan 21, 2018 at 8:39 AM
    #28
    trussdude

    trussdude Well-Known Member

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    I’m at 55,000 miles now and they should be good for another 10,000 miles.
     
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  9. Jul 11, 2019 at 4:21 PM
    #29
    mccgsm

    mccgsm New Member

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    Me. Put me in the driver's seat.
    I'm sitting in Discount now, rotating at 19K and they are not going to make it another 6K miles to the next rotation. Wear is perfectly even; mostly highway miles as I commute weekly Flagstaff-Phoenix; maybe 5-10% gravel USFS roads.

    I've never seen a modern, name-brand radial wear this fast; I've run Kevlar MT/Rs on my Wrangler for many years with some serious off-roading and get better mileage with that far more aggressive tire. No real load on the Tacoma; perhaps 1,000 miles towing a lightly loaded utility trailer on the interstate. In a word, mileage sucks. Shame, as I like Kevlar in my tires.
     
  10. Jul 11, 2019 at 4:27 PM
    #30
    Jleeb

    Jleeb Well-Known Member

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    I have a bone stock OR and need replacing at around 30k. They won’t last another winter. I just ordered new tires to be mounted this fall. Probably 25% dirt roads, 65% paved at slow speeds, 10% highway.
     
  11. Jul 11, 2019 at 4:54 PM
    #31
    Winch

    Winch Well-Known Member

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    So far I really like these tires. They ride well pavement and are grippy. Plus they are quiet. Too early to comment on wear, although I have already had a flat at 1000mi.
     
  12. Jul 11, 2019 at 5:28 PM
    #32
    Pickupman2007

    Pickupman2007 Well-Known Member

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    Just replaced mine at 32k, probably could have gotten 40k but I punctured one and decided to go ahead and get a new set. Personally I’ve not had good luck with tread life on Goodyear tires. Only time will tell if the Coopers i got will hold up longer. The spare was only used that one time to get to the tire store so it’s basically still new and the coopers definitely have deeper tread.
     
  13. Jul 11, 2019 at 5:53 PM
    #33
    24-7

    24-7 Well-Known Member

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    I went 44k on mine. They still had lots of life left. Just make sure you keep rotating them and your alignment is on point for max tyre life.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2019
  14. Jul 12, 2019 at 7:03 AM
    #34
    jholc21

    jholc21 Well-Known Member

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    I switched mine out around 25K. They were down to around 4/32. I could have driven them another 6 months. I was actually pretty impressed with them. The Cooper ST Maxx started with 18/32. With 25K on them, tread depth is showing 11/32.
     
  15. Jul 12, 2019 at 8:12 AM
    #35
    Taco_Trev

    Taco_Trev Member

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    I swear tires that they install at the dealership are different than what you get from the tire store
    The Michelins that came on a Honda Pilot we had lasted 20k Mike's and they were bald. Couldn't believe it, highly rated and had long tread life. I've noticed similar results from other vehicles bought new, I swear they all are done at 20k, then whatever I replace with last 50-60k.
     
  16. Jul 12, 2019 at 8:27 AM
    #36
    jholc21

    jholc21 Well-Known Member

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    I am pretty sure the OEM tires have less tread and are mass produced to be cheaper for the various brands. Wife's Highlander tires also only lasted around 25K. It makes sense for the manufactures to cut corners, the lighter tire will perform better, mpg, etc. for the press events.
     
  17. Jul 12, 2019 at 8:29 AM
    #37
    crazychris4124

    crazychris4124 Earn those pinstripes

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    I'm replacing mine at 30k
     
  18. Jul 12, 2019 at 8:56 AM
    #38
    krupnation

    krupnation Member

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    I just sold my OR wheels and tires that had about 15k miles on them and they had plenty of tred left. I'm running some TRD Pro wheels w/ the same Kevlar GY Wrangler tire and will probably replace them next winter as they are brand new. My buddy sold them to me when he bought his Pro, only have about 500 miles on the tires. 85% highway/street driving and 15% gravel/dirt/mountain logging roads driving
     
  19. Jul 12, 2019 at 7:26 PM
    #39
    MVMike

    MVMike Well-Known Member

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    I’m at 58K now and guessing I’ll get another 10K before hitting the wear bars. Will prob replace before this winter. Surely the longest lasting factory tires on any vehicle I’ve ever owned
     
  20. Jul 12, 2019 at 9:11 PM
    #40
    jquest71

    jquest71 Active Member

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    TRD Pro Grill, Yota LEDS raptor lights, TRD Pro Skid Plate, Method wheels, Cooper AT3 4S tires, Gator tonneau cover, Ecoological Armor coat bumper covers
    Wow that's a lot of variation...some people reporting 50K plus and others only half that? Some things to consider, different states use different materials for paving their roads, some road surfaces are much more abrasive than others (I've learned this from riding street bikes and always being obsessed with maintaining traction and grip). Another thing to consider that I noticed after buying my TRD Off Road is that my local dealer, when doing a service, almost always puts too much pressure in my tires. The Ford dealer did the same thing with my 2014 Fiesta ST and my 2016 F 150, it's like all dealer mechanics think that every tire on every vehicle needs 35 PSI. IIRC (I'm downrange, can't go look at my truck), the sticker in the door jamb on the TRD Off Road calls for 30 PSI...if I'm wrong I apologize in advance but I distinctly remember feeling like my truck rode much rougher after it's first service and when I checked all my tires were over-inflated by the dealer. If you over-inflate these tires when they're cold by 5 to 7 PSI, that pressure will only increase as the tires heat up. Could be a cause, I'm just guessing based on my experiences. Could be that the over-inflated tires are the ones lasting longer, something else to consider. Another thing to remember for anyone considering a move to a colder climate, if you set your tire pressure correctly in the fall, it will not be correct in a couple of months when the temperatures are below freezing. Many people up here around Fort Drum come in from warmer climates where they've never had to think about this, but your pressures can drop significantly with temperature which could affect how the vehicle handles and the tires wear.

    --JQ
     

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