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Tree Climbing or rock climbing suggestions?

Discussion in 'Sports, Hobbies & Interests' started by Janster, Sep 5, 2012.

  1. Sep 5, 2012 at 8:18 AM
    #1
    Janster

    Janster [OP] Old & Forgetful

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    Jandy
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    This might be weird.... but ...thought I'd ask....this is about geocaching (treasure hunt)

    There's a multiple stage geocache and the first stage is 45' up a tree that requires climbing gear. I wouldn't mind climbing up if I had the proper gear & knowledge. However - I'm not going to go out and buy gear and/or take a class just for this one geocache. That's expensive shit....and I really don't see myself doing this again anytime soon.

    So - my question to you guys would be...... and because I'm clueless about the whole tree/rock climbing deal anyway - Are there 'outfitters' and/or guides you can pay for a day to take you places and climb things? Or do they only go to certain locations?

    I don't really know anyone who climbs....or if there are other ways of tackling this sucker. It's out in the middle of State Game lands somewhere, you can't get a crane back there (laugh).

    Any other thoughts? Wonder if I could find a lumber jack who could shimmy himself up there....(laugh)
    Thanks!
     
  2. Sep 5, 2012 at 10:36 AM
    #2
    Streetsurfz727

    Streetsurfz727 Well-Known Member

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    Not only is climbing gear expensive, climbing is very dangerous especially if you don't know what your doing and double if its unsupervised. You need to have a good solid base knowledge for tying knots and how to use your body for leverage. I have heard of people offering seminars on how to learn to climb but I Imagine they are very expensive and time consuming. Tree climbers are work-a-hollics because they make a lot of money and you could probably find one to come climb this tree for a nominal fee on his off day. But at the same time they can also be really flaky. If it were me I would just buy a sling shot/wrist rocket and try and shoot what ever it is your trying to get out of the tree down from the ground.:D
     
  3. Sep 5, 2012 at 10:49 AM
    #3
    Janster

    Janster [OP] Old & Forgetful

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    I wish it were that simple....but the item is probably 'tethered' to the tree and can't be removed. Plus - you have to put it back exactly where you got.
     
  4. Sep 5, 2012 at 12:21 PM
    #4
    mntbiker2008

    mntbiker2008 First I derp.. then I herp

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    I am a climber and highly suggest taking classes. It is extremely dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. oh... and I have about 2k invested in to climbing gear. I know a few guys that are arborists and climb trees every day. If it is a live tree, you don't want to use spikes because of how much it damages the tree. This means there are a bunch of knots and roping techniques you would use to get up to where you need.
     
  5. Sep 6, 2012 at 10:47 AM
    #5
    Janster

    Janster [OP] Old & Forgetful

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    I would never go out there and do it without an experienced person and/or lessons. I don't plan on making this a hobby in itself....

    I just need a 'GUIDE' whom would have the equipment, the knowledge, would be there the entire time, get me setup, navigate me to do it properly...

    I only ever plan on doing this ONE TIME..... Unless of course, the GUIDE does an excellent job and gets us interested in becoming climbers. I wouldn't know if we like it without trying it first.....
     
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