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Wanting to Change brakes

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by Rusty 06 4x4, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. Sep 26, 2011 at 10:10 AM
    #1
    Rusty 06 4x4

    Rusty 06 4x4 [OP] NBHNC

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    I have an 06 Tacoma 4x4 crew cab and want to change the brakes if anyone can help I would appreciate some info I am pretty handy but never changed brakes. I recently changed the HVAC blower motor resister and the compass/temp I soldered all from the help of you fine people on this website. any pics would also be greatly appreciated and links to other threads about this. Thanks:help:
     
  2. Sep 27, 2011 at 12:31 PM
    #2
    BendixAnswerMan

    BendixAnswerMan New Member

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    There are a number of tips that you can follow to get a great brake job.
    As a start, you can use a squeeze bulb and remove the original brake fluid from the master cylinder. Top it off with fresh fluid. This will let new fluid flow through the components when bleeding at the end of the job and pumping the pedal to seat the pads against the rotors.
    Here are some steps used by shops to give great results.

    1. Use the right friction. If it was equipped with Ceramic pads from the manufacturer, use high quality Ceramic pads. For the budget conscious, use mid grade Ceramics.
    If you drive in extreme conditions or heavy urban traffic then high quality semi-met pads are a good alternative choice. If you were happy with the previous pad's performance, sticking with that grade and type is a good choice.

    2. Replace the brake hardware. Many modern calipers use abutment anchor clips. These clips load the pad in a certain direction that minimizes vibration to prevent brake noise. They do not last forever so replacing them when doing a brake job is a good way to help keep the noise from coming back.

    3. If Machining rotors, take the time to machine them properly. You cannot get a rotor too smooth. You should thoroughly clean the inside of the rotor hat of all rust and mount it on the lathe with zero runout. Make a very slow smooth finish cut as your final pass. Thoroughly clean the rotors with soap and water and dry with a paper towel. This cleaning process should also be performed on NEW rotors as well to remove all the machining particles from the pores of the friction surface.

    4. Open the bleeder screws when pushing caliper pistons in. Moisture in brake fluid will cause corrosion in the brake system. This corrosion settles in the calipers. Do not push it back into expensive brake hydraulic components like ABS modulators. Opening the bleeder screws lets the garbage get pushed out of the bleeder. It also stops the master cylinder from becoming over filled.

    5. Inspect and clean wheel speed sensors as part of a routine brake job. This helps prevent false or premature ABS applications from occurring.

    6. Disassemble the caliper far enough to thoroughly clean all sides and pad contact surfaces. Clean the caliper pins and make sure to clean the holes they go into. Use a synthetic (non petroleum based) high temperature brake lube to lubricate all metal to metal contact points. Synthetics can also be used on rubber to metal points.

    7. Service the rear brakes on front wheel drive vehicles. Most FWD vehicles can get over 75K miles of life out of rear brakes because they are usually out of adjustment after 35K miles. Make part of your brake job removing the drums, dump out the dust, clean, adjust, and lubricate the rear brakes. Adding hardware and springs to the job can also assist in controlling rear wheel lockup especially on smaller vehicles.


    8. Thoroughly clean hubs, the inside of the rotor hat, and don’t forget the mounting pad on the wheel! Use a TORQUE WRENCH when installing the wheels. These procedures prevent pedal pulsation from developing.

    9. A brake fluid change if the car is more than three years old. There are many great ways to test brake fluid on the market. Many newer vehicles have complex hydraulic systems in the ABS and Traction Control systems. Putting fresh fluid in and removing the old dirty fluid insures long life for these expensive components.

    10. Road test the vehicle!! Burnish the brakes properly. You will have zero comebacks when you spend 10 minutes breaking in the new brakes and checking your work BEFORE returning the vehicle to your customer.
    A good procedure is: 30 stops from 30mph to 0, with 30 seconds between stops for cooling. This allows the surfaces to mate increasing the ability to dissipate heat. It also allows a film of friction to form on the rotor which will help control noise, wear, and give better life to the system.

    This should help get you started.

     
  3. Sep 27, 2011 at 5:29 PM
    #3
    saugus

    saugus Well-Known Member

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    I suggest the following:

    -buy one big fat can of brake cleaner, hawk lts brakes or oem brakes, new rotors if the ones you have have grooves or are worn (almost guaranteed), a c-clamp, brake fluid to top off afterward, turkey baster to get the fluid down to the minimum mark so you don't overfill afterwards, drain pan, socket wrench and sockets.

    - use half of the can of brake cleaner on each wheel all over the brake pads, rotor and everything in between. Don't be shy, spray it like water. Have a drain pan underneath.

    - Sockets remove the bolts holding the caliper together.

    - c-clamp compresses the caliper after it is removed from the rotor to allow for the new brakes. Use the old brake pad as a platform for the c-clamp to press against so you don't f up your calipers. While doing this the brake fluid will rise in the reservoir (engine bay). So keep the level at minimum to start.

    -You can play around with the rest to get your feet wet.
     
  4. Sep 27, 2011 at 5:43 PM
    #4
    wlmuncy

    wlmuncy Well-Known Member

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    This is the way I do it. Also when you put on the new pads, use the creamy brake stuff they sale at auto parts place to keep them quite. <<<this stuff goes on opposite side of the brake pad - not on the brake pad. :)
     
  5. Sep 27, 2011 at 6:20 PM
    #5
    tombiosis

    tombiosis Well-Known Member

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    search you tube...lots of videos on doing brakes there...
     
  6. Sep 28, 2011 at 1:44 PM
    #6
    Rusty 06 4x4

    Rusty 06 4x4 [OP] NBHNC

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    thanks for the help and advice you people rock
     
  7. Sep 28, 2011 at 3:26 PM
    #7
    thinkingman

    thinkingman Well-Known Member

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    Foglights are for fog, not oncoming traffic!
    Buy new rotors....don't waste your $ on OE from the dealer or slotted/drilled.
    I got cadmium-plated German rotors for $29 each.
    I have had great success with Axxis pads...Deluxe on the Taco.
    Buy a new set of pins...$4 at Napa.
     
  8. Jan 25, 2012 at 10:04 AM
    #8
    Rusty 06 4x4

    Rusty 06 4x4 [OP] NBHNC

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    where can you get the axxis at beside the web
     
  9. Jan 25, 2012 at 10:27 AM
    #9
    dYL0n

    dYL0n ระดับอาวุโส สมาชิกอาวุโส

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    You don't need to bleed the brakes yo
     
  10. Jan 25, 2012 at 10:30 AM
    #10
    Rusty 06 4x4

    Rusty 06 4x4 [OP] NBHNC

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    i didnt think so either
     
  11. Jan 25, 2012 at 12:40 PM
    #11
    dYL0n

    dYL0n ระดับอาวุโส สมาชิกอาวุโส

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    Yeah you never open any of the brake lines to change pads. Only time you bleed is if you open a brake line, new calipers, new booster, etc.,
     
  12. Jan 25, 2012 at 2:23 PM
    #12
    thinkingman

    thinkingman Well-Known Member

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    Foglights are for fog, not oncoming traffic!
    I got mine online...Import Replacement PArts.
    Maybe NAPA locally?
     
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