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What Can You Pull?

Discussion in '2nd Gen. Tacomas (2005-2015)' started by TuckHolladay, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. Jul 21, 2018 at 8:41 AM
    #1
    TuckHolladay

    TuckHolladay [OP] Well-Known Member

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    so I am going to look at a cool old late 70s 22’ camper today. Looking up the specs on the internet it says it weighs 3300lbs. I have an Off Road with the tow package, but it is automatic, says it should pull around 6500.

    Any advice? Too long? Too heavy? I’m in New York State so no crazy inclines. I am a total trailer noob.
     
  2. Jul 21, 2018 at 8:42 AM
    #2
    Speedytech7

    Speedytech7 Toyota Cult Ombudsman

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    Should be just fine if you make sure it sits level while you're pulling and the tongue weight isn't too high. If you're a trailer noob think about where you're driving because backing up isn't a treat when you're new with a 22' trailer haha
     
  3. Jul 21, 2018 at 8:49 AM
    #3
    TuckHolladay

    TuckHolladay [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I’ll practice. I back up trailers at work sometimes.
     
  4. Jul 21, 2018 at 8:49 AM
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    Muddinfun

    Muddinfun Well-Known Member

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    The truck will handle it just fine but an 8' x 22' trailer is not the trailer to be learning with. Go rent about a 5' x 8' open trailer and drag it around town.
     
    SpeedShift01 likes this.
  5. Jul 21, 2018 at 8:50 AM
    #5
    diabetiktaco

    diabetiktaco Instalander

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    No crazy inclines? When I drove upstate I get like 8mpg.
     
  6. Jul 21, 2018 at 8:54 AM
    #6
    TuckHolladay

    TuckHolladay [OP] Well-Known Member

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    I just mean like not Colorado or anything. I was just out there last month and those are a whole different kinda mountain roads.
     
  7. Jul 21, 2018 at 9:38 AM
    #7
    SpeedShift01

    SpeedShift01 Active Member

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    3000lbs no problem the only thing you need to worry about are two things. 1 your ability to drive with the trailer in different ways like backing it up and parking with it. 2 do u have a trailer brake controller or for the matter does the camper have breaks. not that you 100% need it but it just helps to put less strain on your truck breaks.
     
  8. Jul 21, 2018 at 9:59 AM
    #8
    Grey 2015

    Grey 2015 Well-Known Member

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    If you're a trailer noob and towing that much weight leave plenty of following distance especially in wet conditions.
     
  9. Jul 21, 2018 at 10:10 AM
    #9
    MolonLabeTaco

    MolonLabeTaco Well-Known Member

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    A shit ton of tail.
     
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  10. Jul 21, 2018 at 10:49 AM
    #10
    Douglas1953

    Douglas1953 Active Member

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    I find backing a longer trailer is a lot easier than a short trailer you can see it better in the mirrors and it will not jack knife as fast on you and you can correct it easier if it does.

    Doug is
     
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  11. Jul 21, 2018 at 6:13 PM
    #11
    Marshall R

    Marshall R Well-Known Member

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    Campers 40 years ago were heavier than today and 3000-3300 is pretty typical for a modern 22' travel trailer. If it really is 3300 lbs then it won't be a problem unless you add 2000 lbs of stuff inside. I'd make sure of the actual weight 1st, even if you have to take it to some scales and have it weighed.

    Your truck will pull 6500 lbs. The bigger problem is payload. There will be a payload sticker on the drivers door or door jamb. Once you determine the trailers actual weight including full propane tanks and anything else you put in it figure 13% for tongue weight. If the camper is 3300 dry and you put 700 lbs in it you're up to 4000 lbs and 520 lbs on the tongue. If your payload is 1200 lbs then you have almost 700 lbs of payload in the truck for passengers and cargo. Which is reasonable.

    While your truck would pull 6500 lbs, the tongue weight along with required weight distribution hitch for anything over 5000 lbs will not leave much or any payload in the truck for anything but a skinny driver. No other passengers or cargo. Around 4000-4500 lbs is realistically a better max for towing with most of these trucks.
     

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